Fish in Indonesia are eating plastic fibers from used diapers

The fish in Indonesia are eating plastic from used diapers. It was found that an astonishing 80 percent of the fish examined had ingested plastic from disposable diapers. The image is a microscopic image of a fish's stomach, with diaper fibers highlighted

Fish in Indonesia are eating plastic from used diapers, passing toxic fibers from the food chain to humans, warns a new study on the country's unbridled problem.

It was discovered that a surprising 80 percent of the fish examined by scientists ingested small plastic fibers from disposable diapers, including two species consumed by the locals.

A metric ton of diapers are thrown into the Branta River, the longest river in the eastern Java province, every year, the researchers found.

They said that the diapers used quickly decompose in the sun in microscopic pieces that are easily swallowed by the fish and then transferred to humans.

Even those who do not eat fish are at risk of contamination, and experts warn that the diapers discharged into the Brantas "contaminate" the drinking water with plastic, endangering the health of another 3 million people in Surabaya.

Four of Indonesia's rivers, including the Brantas, are among the 20 most polluted in the world, and each year the country sheds 200,000 tons of plastic to the world's oceans.

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The fish in Indonesia are eating plastic from used diapers. It was found that an astonishing 80 percent of the fish examined had ingested plastic from disposable diapers. The image is a microscopic image of a fish's stomach, with diaper fibers highlighted

The fish in Indonesia are eating plastic from used diapers. It was found that an astonishing 80 percent of the fish examined had ingested plastic from disposable diapers. The image is a microscopic image of a fish's stomach, with diaper fibers highlighted

Experts from the environmental group Ecological Observation and Wetland Conservation (Ecoton) examined the waste collected in a single gate of Brantas locks.

Sliding doors are used to control the flow of water and are often obstructed by large pieces of floating debris.

After 30 cleanings in the gate over the course of 12 months, the researchers calculated the amount of waste thrown into the Brantas River each year.

The researchers also trapped members of 21 fish species in the sluice gate and examined the contents of their stomach.

Plastic fibers from disposable diapers were found in the stomachs of various types of fish, including locally known as rengkik, nila, ketking, bader putih and jendil.

Andreas Agus, a researcher with the group, said residents in the nearby city of Surabaya ate ketchup and sauté fish.

Four of Indonesia's rivers are ranked among the 20 most polluted in the world, and some 200,000 tons of plastic are dumped each year in the world's oceans. In the photo, a scavenger paddling down the Sentiong River in the country's capital, Jakarta.

Four of Indonesia's rivers are ranked among the 20 most polluted in the world, and some 200,000 tons of plastic are dumped each year in the world's oceans. In the photo, a scavenger paddling down the Sentiong River in the country's capital, Jakarta.

Four of Indonesia's rivers are ranked among the 20 most polluted in the world, and some 200,000 tons of plastic are dumped each year in the world's oceans. In the photo, a scavenger paddling down the Sentiong River in the country's capital, Jakarta.

His team found plastic fibers in 80 percent of the fish they examined.

Ecoton executive Prigi Arisandi said: "When disposable diapers are submerged in water and exposed to the sun, they eventually break down into smaller pieces.

"The fish swallow the pieces, which can be transferred from the stomach to the meat." When people eat the fish, the plastic is transferred to their bodies. "

Other solid waste had & # 39; contaminated & # 39; water with plastic, said Ecoton, putting at risk the health of 3 million drinking water customers in Surabaya.

The group urged officials to protect Indonesia's rivers from solid waste, particularly disposable diapers.

HOW SERIOUS IS INDONESIA'S PLASTIC DISPOSAL PROBLEM?

Four of Indonesia's rivers are among the 20 most polluted in the world.

Plastic waste in the Ciliwung River of Indonesia

Plastic waste in the Ciliwung River of Indonesia

Plastic waste in the Ciliwung River of Indonesia

This means that the country is the second largest contributor to marine plastic contamination after China.

It is estimated that each year 200,000 tons of plastic flow to the world's oceans from the rivers of Indonesia, mainly from Java and Sumatra.

In addition to the levels of ocean pollution, the country's plastic problem also affects its residents.

The microplastic microorganisms produced by the decomposition of large pieces of waste are ingested by the fish and then pass to the food chain for humans.

Trash Free Seas Alliance (TFSA), a non-governmental organization in the United States, revealed in December 2017 that microplastics had been found in 28 percent of fish in Indonesian markets.

Ecoton also asked the public to switch to reusable cloth diapers to reduce waste.

"Consumers must change their behavior, the more comfortable a product makes us, the more threatening it is to our lives," Agus said.

A spokesman for the East Java authority said local mayors had been asked to establish more waste storage facilities and to instruct residents not to dump waste into rivers.

Trash Free Seas Alliance (TFSA), a non-governmental organization in the United States, revealed in December that microplastics had been found in 28 percent of fish in Indonesian markets.

The microplastics come from plastic waste that enters the rivers and ends in the sea.

Half a metric ton of diapers are poured into the Branta River, the longest river in the Indonesian province of East Java, every year.

Half a metric ton of diapers are poured into the Branta River, the longest river in the Indonesian province of East Java, every year.

Half a metric ton of diapers are poured into the Branta River, the longest river in the Indonesian province of East Java, every year.

HOW CAN MICROPLASTICS COME TO THE OCEANS OF THE RIVERS?

Urban floods are causing microplastics to be washed into our oceans even faster than previously thought, according to scientists who observe pollution in rivers.

The water courses in Greater Manchester are now so heavily contaminated by microplastics that the particles are found in each sample, including the smallest streams.

This pollution is a major contributor to pollution in the oceans, the researchers found as part of the first detailed study of the entire basin anywhere in the world.

These wastes, which include microbeads and microfibers, are toxic to ecosystems.

The scientists tested 40 sites around Manchester and found that each waterway contained these small toxic particles.

Microplastics are very small pieces of plastic waste that include microbeads, microfibers and plastic fragments.

It has been known for a long time that they enter river systems from multiple sources, including industrial effluents, storm drains and domestic sewage.

However, although it is believed that about 90 percent of the microplastic pollution in the oceans originates in the earth, not much is known about their movements.

Most of the rivers examined had around 517,000 plastic particles per square meter, according to researchers at the University of Manchester who carried out the detailed study.

After a period of great flooding, the researchers returned to take samples at all sites.

They discovered that pollution levels had decreased in most of them, and the flooding had eliminated approximately 70 percent of the microplastics stored in riverbeds.

This shows that flood events can transfer large amounts of microplastics from the urban river to the oceans.

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