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An upstate New York school district will enable its controversial automated surveillance software that detects guns and identifies faces on June 3, 2019 (stock image)
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An upstate New York school district will enable its controversial automated surveillance software that can detect guns and identify faces on June 3, 2019.

Lockport City School District was the first in the nation to install the improved Aegis camera system at its schools in October 2018 and is now starting testing.

The security system must be broadly operational by September 1, 2019 in the high school, high school and six primary schools of the district.

The Aegis surveillance system can identify guns in the recorded video images and compare people's faces with the security databases.

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The controversial development has attracted pushback from local parents, advocates of privacy and some legislators, who claim it can invade student privacy.

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An upstate New York school district will enable its controversial automated surveillance software that detects guns and identifies faces on June 3, 2019 (stock image)

An upstate New York school district will enable its controversial automated surveillance software that detects guns and identifies faces on June 3, 2019 (stock image)

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Every client who installs the system can choose which information is loaded into the database.

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They can get the material from local mugshot databases or images of students who have been deported.

From there it scans every face and compares it to the database.

If there is no match, the system removes the face that has just been recorded.

But if it finds an agreement, it sends a warning to the control center.

The upcoming tests will & # 39; a first implementation phase & # 39; to train school staff in the use of the system and to enable officials to make the necessary changes to the security design before the full-scale Lockport City School District is rolled out. Chief Inspector Michelle Bradley told The hill.

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District officials will also work with local law enforcement officials to determine what procedures should be followed in the event that the Aegis system detects a person or object of concern at school grounds.

However, concerns remain about the implementation of the system.

Monica Wallace, a New York state democrat, is considering a bill that would prevent the Lockport City School District from using the automated surveillance system.

De Bradley acknowledged the controversy and noted that the system & # 39; is not something that is currently forbidden to us & # 39 ;.

& # 39; We have a policy to protect privacy & # 39 ;, she added.

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& # 39; We have identified a small group of individuals that will be placed in a database. & # 39;

The district uses a system developed by SN Technologies Corp., the parent company of Aegis motherboard.

Aegis has developed its own software that can be used to detect weapons that can occur in video images.

On its website, the company describes that the technology can be used to alert school officials when someone from the local register of sex offenders enters a school or when suspended students, dismissed employees, known gang members or an affiliate enter a school. & # 39;

Any client who chooses to install the system, in this case Lockport, can choose which information is loaded into his database.

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They can retrieve material from local mugshot databases or use images from former students who have been excluded from the campus.

To get the system up and running, Lockport installs or updates about 417 cameras at six elementary schools, one high school, one high school and one administration building, Motherboard said.

Lockport City School District uses a system from SN Technologies Corp., the parent company of Aegis. Pictured is Lockport High School, which installs multiple cameras

Lockport City School District uses a system from SN Technologies Corp., the parent company of Aegis. Pictured is Lockport High School, which installs multiple cameras

Lockport City School District uses a system from SN Technologies Corp., the parent company of Aegis. Pictured is Lockport High School, which installs multiple cameras

The school district used $ 1.4 million (£ 1.77 million) assigned to New York & # 39; s Smart Schools Bond Act to install the Aegis system, the Lockport Union-Sun & Journal reported.

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The grant application explains why he decided to continue with facial recognition technology at various schools in the district.

According to Motherboard, the application said it wanted the money for & # 39; new cameras & wiring … to watch and automated face recognition and object recognition of live and recorded surveillance video, & # 39; plus & # 39; extra surveillance servers … to provide improved storage of recorded video and processing. & # 39;

KC Flynn, head of SN Technologies, told Motherboard that 20 other American school districts are considering moving forward with Aegis face recognition technology.

Once users have built a database of potential security risks, the system is set up.

It scans every face and compares it with the database. If there is no match, the system removes the face it has just captured, but if it finds a match, it sends a warning to the center.

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Many say that schooling can give a few extra minutes of much needed lead time if an unwanted person is on campus – especially if they are armed.

The system works by scanning each face and comparing it to the database. If there is no match, the face is deleted, but if a match is found, the system alerts the panel

The system works by scanning each face and comparing it to the database. If there is no match, the face is deleted, but if a match is found, the system alerts the panel

The system works by scanning each face and comparing it to the database. If there is no match, the face is deleted, but if a match is found, the system alerts the panel

HOW DOES FACIAL RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY WORK?

Face recognition is increasingly being used as a way to access your money and your devices.

When it comes to police work, this can quickly mean the difference between freedom and imprisonment.

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Faces can be scanned remotely and generate a code that is as unique as your fingerprints.

This is made by measuring the distance between different points, such as the width of a person's nose, the distance between the eyes, and the length of the jaw line.

Face recognition systems monitor more than 80 comparison points, also called & # 39; nodes & # 39; called, which they combine to make a person's face print.

These facial images can then be used to search through a database, comparing a suspect with known perpetrators.

Face recognition is increasingly being used as a way to access your money and your devices. When it comes to police work, this can quickly mean the difference between freedom and imprisonment (stock)

Face recognition is increasingly being used as a way to access your money and your devices. When it comes to police work, this can quickly mean the difference between freedom and imprisonment (stock)

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Face recognition is increasingly being used as a way to access your money and your devices. When it comes to police work, this can quickly mean the difference between freedom and imprisonment (stock)

Face scanning systems used on personal electronic devices work slightly differently and vary from gadget to gadget.

The iPhone X, for example, uses Face ID via a 7MP camera on the front of the handset that consists of several components.

One is a Dot projector that projects more than 30,000 invisible dots on your face to map its structure.

The point card is then read by an infrared camera and the structure of your face is transferred to the A11 Bionic chip in the iPhone X, where it is converted into a mathematical model.

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The A11 chip then compares your face structure with the face scan stored in the iPhone X during the setup process.

Security cameras use artificial intelligence-driven systems that scan for faces, refocus, skew, and stretch before converting to black and white to make facial features easier for computer algorithms.

Error rates with face recognition can be as low as 0.8 percent. Although this sounds low, in the real world, eight out of every 1000 scans can unjustly identify an innocent party.

One case reported in The interception, details of how Steven Talley was falsely compared to security images of a bank robber.

Critics, however, say that the large number of school photographers are students who are registered or people who are not in the database.

There is also no evidence of the system that leads to safer schools.

The New York Civil Liberties Union (NCLU) has also expressed concern about how the system might be biased against people of color and women on campus.

In addition, documents have shown that the district was not involved with the local community before they decided to install the system.

The NCLU also pointed out that there is currently no possibility for the public to access the data collected from the cameras, or to find out which faces have been entered into the system.

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