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FIRST person to be detained indefinitely under the Patriot Act is free and has left the US for an unknown country

58-year-old Adham Amin Hassoun left the country after a judge ordered his release last month

58-year-old Adham Amin Hassoun left the country after a judge ordered his release last month

The first person to be detained indefinitely under the Patriot Act for terrorism allegations has been released and left the US for an unknown country.

58-year-old Adham Amin Hassoun left the country after a judge ordered his release last month, because the government has not proved that he is a threat to national security, his lawyers confirmed.

Donald Trump made history last year when he became the first U.S. president to invoke the Patriot Act to keep someone behind bars indefinitely.

Hassoun was detained in a federal immigration detention center in Batavia, despite the fact that he had already completed his sentence in 2017 after spending 15 years cutting controls on extremist-linked Islamic charities used by Congress following the 9/11 attacks. were prohibited.

Authorities have disagreed about the danger the Palestinian national poses to America, with the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security claiming that he is likely to engage in terrorist activity, while a federal judge ruled that their claims are based on prison informers and a lack of evidence.

Nicole Hallett, one of Hassoun’s lawyers, confirmed that after the conviction, the first terrorist detainee walked free and went to another country, the report said. Daily beast.

The Trump administration eventually deported the stateless man after they returned a request to release him in his sister’s detention in Florida.

Hassoun’s whereabouts are now unknown.

Hallett said the government had abused its power to keep Hassoun behind bars indefinitely.

“If the government has this authority, it will abuse it, and this has been proven in this case,” Hallett told the Beast.

“This will not determine the constitutionality of PATRIOT Section 412, but what it does is show precisely why the government does not have the authority to detain anyone indefinitely without bringing criminal charges.”

A courtroom sketch of Adham Amin Hassoun (second from left) with Jose Padilla (second from right) at the Miami trial in 2007. Hassoun was the first person to be detained indefinitely under the Patriot Act for terrorism allegations and he has now been released and has gone to an unknown country

A courtroom sketch of Adham Amin Hassoun (second from left) with Jose Padilla (second from right) at the Miami trial in 2007. Hassoun was the first person to be detained indefinitely under the Patriot Act for terrorism allegations and he has now been released and has gone to an unknown country

A courtroom sketch of Adham Amin Hassoun (second from left) with Jose Padilla (second from right) at the Miami trial in 2007. Hassoun was the first person to be detained indefinitely under the Patriot Act for terrorism allegations and he has now been released and has gone to an unknown country

The government’s case to keep Hassoun behind bars collapsed indefinitely last month after U.S. district judge Elizabeth Wolford ruled it was based on weak evidence and lies from informers.

In a 43-page ruling, Woolford wrote that Hassoun’s imprisonment was not “legally permitted by law or regulation” and ordered that he be released days later.

She ruled that the FBI and DHS had made no claims that the 58-year-old is dangerous and likely to engage in terrorist activity if released.

The evidence was found to be thin at best and was based on reports from a prison snitch that had been exposed as untrustworthy.

Wolford said the government’s incarceration of Hassoun “was based on executive rulings” and “had no legal oversight over factual findings” that he poses a threat.

Hassoun, who moved to the US in 1989 and was living in Florida at the time, was first arrested in June 2002 for an immigration defect.

He was on trial at the time and found guilty of cutting controls on extremist-linked Muslim charities and was sentenced to 15 years in prison.

All but one of the controls were carried out before the September 11 attacks devastated America and killed 2,977 people.

Donald Trump became the first U.S. President to enlist the Patriot Act last year to put a person behind bars indefinitely

Donald Trump became the first U.S. President to enlist the Patriot Act last year to put a person behind bars indefinitely

Donald Trump became the first U.S. President to enlist the Patriot Act last year to put a person behind bars indefinitely

Although he was tried alongside the once-suspected “dirty bomber” Jose Padilla, Hassoun’s crimes were not for acts or plots of violence.

Hassoun was to be released in 2017 and ICE officials warned that he would be deported.

But his statelessness as a Palestinian prevented this, as neither his native Lebanon nor Israel were willing to take him for refuge.

He won a legal battle in favor of his release because the chances of his deportation were limited.

However, the Trump administration declared him a threat to national security and used an obscure immigration scheme to circumvent a Supreme Court ruling that allowed no longer than six months in prison.

The move would be aided by sealed testimonials outlining Hassoun’s alleged crimes behind bars by other prisoners.

Trump then invoked Section 412 of the Patriot Act for the first time in U.S. history.

The clause allows the government to imprison non-citizens who are incarcerated on U.S. soil and who cannot be deported and who are “involved on reasonable grounds” in “activities that endanger the national security of the United States” .

The government claimed that he took on a “leading role” in a criminal conspiracy to recruit fighters and provide equipment to support terrorist organizations.

His case has long been divided, with Judge Marcia G. Cooke saying in 2008 that the government was unable to find “identifiable victims” as a result of his actions and rejecting the Department of Justice’s life sentence.

Hassoun claimed that he was prosecuted for refusing to become a federal informant in 2002 while on immigration detention.

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