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First Holden Monaro to win Bathurst, 1968 HK GTS 327, sells for $200k

The family of a deceased Bundaberg reed farmer who owned a 1968 Holden HK GTS Monaro 327 for over 50 years sold the car at auction for a staggering $200,000.

The car was sold at a live auction last month by Bill Young of the Bundaberg Auction Center for $200,000.

Mr. Young said the 327 Monaro was the first Monaro to ever win Bathurst and only one of two to ever win the historic event.

The bidding started at $50,000 and a bidding war soon ensued, with prices skyrocketing to $200,000 in no time with the sale closing in less than two minutes.

Mr Young said the car once belonged to a local sugarcane farmer named Darryl Scherer, who bought the vehicle as a family car to take the kids to and from school.

The very first Holden Monaro, the very first Monaro to win Bathurst, which belonged to the local Bundaberg reed farmer, has sold for $200k.

The very first Holden Monaro, the very first Monaro to win Bathurst, which belonged to the local Bundaberg reed farmer, has sold for $200k.

Scott Tumbridge of the Sunshine Coast for $200,000 at an auction last month in Queensland, with the car drawing interest from around the world.

Scott Tumbridge of the Sunshine Coast for $200,000 at an auction last month in Queensland, with the car drawing interest from around the world.

He said that when Darryl’s wife died, he moved to a piece of land on the outskirts of Bundaberg, where he put the car in a shed in 2006, with plans to restore it, but unfortunately it never happened.

“As time went on, the project dwindled and when he passed away last December, he left his entire estate to his four daughters scattered across the country,” said Mr. Young.

“His family hired me to sell everything and he had absolutely everything, every type of tool you can think of and three large sheds of stuff. We are talking about 500 square meters of warehouses.’

Mr Young said the craziest part of the ordeal was that although his family knew the car was there, they had no idea of ​​its true value.

“When he came by, we knew where it was, but it was in a corner of one of the barns, covered in old corn bags with a vinyl cooling film over it,” he said.

‘We lifted it out of the shed and put it on a tilting tray. We never touched it and we sold it with the red dirt and dust along with all its stuff.

“We ended up selling about 500 lots of his possessions.”

Mr Young said that as soon as he listed the car, his phone started to light up with inquiries from all over the world.

‘The car attracted 300-400 requests. There was interest from Bangkok to every major capital and probably 500-600 people attended the auction in person.

The car was eventually sold to Scott Tumbridge of the Sunshine Coast for $200,000.

Auctioneer Bill Young said the $200,000 price tag could be a steal as the car is likely to fetch between $600,000 and $1.5 million once repaired.

Auctioneer Bill Young said the $200,000 price tag could be a steal as the car is likely to fetch between $600,000 and $1.5 million once repaired.

Mr Tumbridge had only heard of the sale that week and drove to the car on Friday evening to buy the car at auction the following day at 1pm, which Mr Young said was a bargain.

“I spoke to one of the underbidders who just missed it, and he said the car was worth between $600,000 and $1.5 million once repaired, depending on the market environment,” said Mr. young.

“I think if you had the $200,000 to buy it and $100,000 to $150,000 to fix it, you’d have something really unique to go to a market and make a lot of money.

Noeleen Schulte, daughter of Darryl, who originally bought the vehicle more than 50 years ago, spoke to The Courier Mail about her memories of the vehicle and recalled how she was the talk of the school when she was picked up in the two-door car. .

Noeleen talked about seeing the bright red Monaro with a painted black stripe on the roof and how she felt like the coolest kids in school when she got to drive the car.

She said the car was used not only as a means of transportation, but also as a way to challenge the guys who were looking for a date with her and her three sisters.

Darryl Scherer's daughter Noeleen recalled fond memories of traveling in the car as a child, saying she felt like the coolest kid when she got to drive the car.

Darryl Scherer’s daughter Noeleen recalled fond memories of traveling in the car as a child, saying she felt like the coolest kid when she got to drive the car.

‘He [Darryl] was a former karter in his days and raced with them so he liked speed,” she said.

“He used to check the courage of soon-to-be sons-in-law with a quick ride up the road with the boys as passengers. If they got out of the car after the ride and could stand, they would pass.’

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