Home Australia First ham and cheese toasties, now FAIRY BREAD: School canteens are barred from selling Aussie classic – sparking fury

First ham and cheese toasties, now FAIRY BREAD: School canteens are barred from selling Aussie classic – sparking fury

by Elijah
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South Australia has demonized a childhood favorite food, placing it on the red list. It is not only prohibited in schools, but also at sports carnivals and after school care (stock image of a girl enjoying fairy bread)

A ban on serving ham and cheese toasties in school canteens sparked outrage over the weekend.

And now state education officials have called for fairy bread to be canned, too.

South Australia’s Department of Education says sparklers should not be provided or provided in the state’s public schools, according to its Right Bite healthy food and drink guidelines.

The South Australian government has said the guidelines are just that: guidelines and not a ban.

The government also said the guidelines do not apply to what parents carry in their children’s school lunchboxes.

The news comes after Western Australia banned toasted ham and cheese sandwiches in all public schools in a bid to reduce consumption of processed meats, which can lead to a higher risk factor for developing bowel cancer.

South Australia has demonized a childhood favorite food, placing it on the red list. It is not only prohibited in schools, but also at sports carnivals and after school care (stock image of a girl enjoying fairy bread)

School children in South Australia (file photo pictured) can no longer have access to their beloved fairy bread in the canteen or at parties or class rewards.

School children in South Australia (file photo pictured) can no longer have access to their beloved fairy bread in the canteen or at parties or class rewards.

Adelaide dietician Mattea Palombo, who encourages a balanced diet, said The advertiser Removing candy gave the kids the wrong impression.

“We are sending a message to children and also to parents that they should restrict themselves, which prioritizes foods and only makes children want them more,” he said.

Palombo said sprinkled bread is a “happy” food and is linked to joyful childhood memories.

The nutritionist agrees that it may not provide the same nutritional value as fruits and vegetables, but it should not be prohibited if it is part of a healthy diet.

South Australian School Parents Community Association president Jenice Zerna said she was devastated by the fairy bread ban and said she would prefer to give her granddaughter a slice rather than a packet of crisps.

“And for some parents, something like fairy bread might be the only cost-effective thing they can afford to supply for that party or fundraiser,” she said.

Zerna agreed that healthy guidelines need to be in place, but sees no harm in bringing them to school on special occasions, such as parties.

Fairy bread is just one of many items that, according to Right Bite guidelines, should not be available in South Australian schools.

Foods are divided into four categories: green for the best options, amber for those that must be chosen carefully, and red 1 for items that can only be eaten twice a quarter in the “smallest portion available.”

Red 2 is for items that can never be sold or supplied on any occasion.

The strict guidelines were updated last June and do not only apply to primary and secondary school cafeterias.

This magical childhood food is nostalgic and many believe there is nothing wrong with enjoying it on special occasions, such as school parties.

This magical childhood food is nostalgic and many believe there is nothing wrong with enjoying it on special occasions, such as school parties.

They are also applicable at fundraising events and sporting carnivals, field trips, camps, out-of-school-hours care (OSHC), and classroom rewards and incentives.

Other 2 red items include hot chips, fried foods, sugary ice blocks and sweets, including chocolate alternative carob.

Cakes, sausage rolls and favorite sandwich fillings such as honey and jam are on red list 1 and must only be sold or offered at special school events twice a term.

The green list includes bread, canned fish, low-fat natural milk and cottage cheese.

The guidelines say green list foods should make up 60 percent of what is sold in school cafeterias.

South Australian Education Minister Blair Boyer said the guidelines were developed to help teach young children about healthy eating.

“Preventive education is always the best way to instill healthy eating habits, and the Right Bite resource is designed as a practical strategy to help schools,” she said.

Health advocate and 2020 Australian of the Year Dr James Muecke said the guidelines were based on outdated information.

Muecke believed it is not enough to stop obesity and type two diabetes, and said it was necessary to include a program warning schoolchildren about the dangers of red foods.

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