Finger-bending gadget can detect Parkinson's in 30 seconds

A gadget that uses a small motor to bend a patient's middle finger can diagnose Parkinson's in 30 seconds by testing how stiff muscles are

  • The Rigidity Device (BiRD) of the Bionics Institute is attached with a Velcro fastener
  • It flexes the finger repeatedly for 30 seconds and tests for muscle stiffness
  • Scientists say that stiffness is one of the first symptoms of Parkinson's
  • There are currently no tests that can definitively prove that a patient has Parkinson's
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Parkinson's can be diagnosed by using a small motor to bend the middle finger of a patient thanks to a new device.

Scientists invented the gadget hoping to tell patients that they need years before it gets hold.

There are currently no tests that can conclusively prove that a patient has Parkinson's, NHS and Parkinson's disease in the UK.

The high-tech gadget is attached with Velcro and bends the patient's finger repeatedly for 30 seconds.

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The Bionics Institute's Rigidity Device is attached with Velcro and bends the patient's finger repeatedly for 30 seconds. In that case it uses a number of & # 39; integrated sensors & # 39; to register the force needed to bend their middle number. This provides an objective measurement of muscle stiffness, which is one of the first Parkinson's symptoms to appear

The Bionics Institute's Rigidity Device is attached with Velcro and bends the patient's finger repeatedly for 30 seconds. In that case it uses a number of & # 39; integrated sensors & # 39; to register the force needed to bend their middle number. This provides an objective measurement of muscle stiffness, which is one of the first Parkinson's symptoms to appear

In that case it uses a number of & # 39; integrated sensors & # 39; to register the force needed to bend their middle number.

This provides an objective measurement of muscle stiffness, which is one of the first Parkinson's symptoms to appear.

Researchers claim that the stiffer the muscles are, the more difficulty the finger moves, indicating how advanced the condition is.

The developers of the claim testing gadget have shown that the device can distinguish between Parkinson's patients and healthy volunteers.

The Rigidity Device (BiRD) of the Bionics Institute, which is what has been mentioned, was made by a team from the Australian Bionics Institute.

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It can be used initially in doctors' doctor's office for a test that only takes a few minutes before it is used by patients.

Inventor Dr. Thushara Perera said: “In the future, patients may be able to use the BiRD at home to monitor their own health.

& # 39; They could then submit a report to their doctor, just like a blood glucose meter for diabetics.

Parkinson's disease affects one in 500 people and around 127,000 people in the UK and one million in the US live with the condition (supply)

Parkinson's disease affects one in 500 people and around 127,000 people in the UK and one million in the US live with the condition (supply)

Parkinson's disease affects one in 500 people and around 127,000 people in the UK and one million in the US live with the condition (supply)

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& # 39; This will help their physician decide how to give the best treatment to their patients, including which medications to administer. & # 39;

It comes after a survey today revealed 87 percent of people with Parkinson's are discriminated against.

Parkinson's disease affects one in 500 people, and around 127,000 people in the UK and one million in the US live with the condition.

Doctors must make a diagnosis based on symptoms, medical history and a physical examination.

This can be tricky because Parkinson's causes many symptoms that can vary between different people, such as tremors and fatigue.

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Parkinson's disease affects one in 500 people and around 127,000 people in the UK live with the condition.

Figures also suggest that one million Americans also suffer.

It causes muscle stiffness, slow motion, tremors, sleep disorders, chronic fatigue, a reduced quality of life and can lead to severe disability.

It is a progressive neurological disorder that destroys cells in the part of the brain that controls movement.

Patients are known to have a reduced supply of dopamine because nerve cells that cause them to die.

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There is currently no cure and no way to stop the progression of the disease, but hundreds of scientific studies are underway to try to change that.

The disease claimed the life of boxing legend Muhammad Ali in 2016.

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