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Filipino officials are turning ashes thrown from the Taal volcano in BRICKS

Filipino officials are turning the ashes thrown from the Taal volcano into BRICKS in an attempt to rebuild homes damaged by the eruption and combat the country’s pollution problems.

  • The Taal volcano in the Philippines erupted after being inactive for 43 years.
  • He sprayed a nine-mile stream of ash, which covered the surrounding areas
  • The authorities are mixing the ashes with cement, sand and plastic to make bricks.
  • They will send the bricks to the cities to rebuild the damaged structures.

The Taal volcano in the Philippines woke up from a 43-year-old dream earlier this month, which threw a nine-mile stream of ash into the air and covered nearby cities with black soot.

Now, environmentalists are mixing waste with plastic waste to make bricks in response to persistent pollution problems and frequent natural disasters in the country.

The ashes are combined with sand, cement and discarded plastic, which, according to the authorities, allows them to manufacture 5,000 bricks a day to rebuild parts of the city that were destroyed by the devastating eruption.

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The mayor of Biñan, Arman Dimaguila, said they will send ash bricks to the towns of Calata, Lemery and Agoncillo, in Batangas, when it is safe and the situation stabilizes.

The mayor of Biñan, Arman Dimaguila, said they will send ash bricks to the towns of Calata, Lemery and Agoncillo, in Batangas, when it is safe and the situation stabilizes.

The city’s environmental officer, Rodelio Lee, said: ‘Instead of accumulating the ash fall somewhere, we can turn it into something useful. And also includes plastics.

The eruption, which occurred on January 12, forced the evacuation of some 120,000 people in the area.

Lava fountains poured today into the lake surrounding the Taal volcano after it threw ash columns up to nine miles into the sky on Sunday.

Ash clouds flew more than 60 miles north of the volcano, reaching Manila and closing the country’s main airport with hundreds of canceled flights.

Environmentalists are mixing waste with plastic waste to make bricks in response to persistent pollution problems and frequent natural disasters in the country.

Environmentalists are mixing waste with plastic waste to make bricks in response to persistent pollution problems and frequent natural disasters in the country.

Environmentalists are mixing waste with plastic waste to make bricks in response to persistent pollution problems and frequent natural disasters in the country.

The ashes are combined with sand, cement and discarded plastic, which, according to the authorities, allows them to manufacture 5,000 bricks a day to rebuild parts of the city that were destroyed by the devastating eruption.

The ashes are combined with sand, cement and discarded plastic, which, according to the authorities, allows them to manufacture 5,000 bricks a day to rebuild parts of the city that were destroyed by the devastating eruption.

The ashes are combined with sand, cement and discarded plastic, which, according to the authorities, allows them to manufacture 5,000 bricks a day to rebuild parts of the city that were destroyed by the devastating eruption.

Not only was the area covered with thick ashes, the Philippines is also fighting a waste crisis, which authorities say has nearly 60 million disposable envelopes every year.

It is also plagued by about 20 major storms annually and regular and powerful earthquakes that together kill hundreds of people every year.

Due to its position in the seismic activity zone of the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’, it also has periodic volcanic eruptions.

Not only was the area covered with thick ashes, the Philippines is also fighting a waste crisis, which authorities say has nearly 60 million disposable envelopes every year. The bricks will be used to repair damaged houses.

Not only was the area covered with thick ashes, the Philippines is also fighting a waste crisis, which authorities say has nearly 60 million disposable envelopes every year. The bricks will be used to repair damaged houses.

Not only was the area covered with thick ashes, the Philippines is also fighting a waste crisis, which authorities say has nearly 60 million disposable envelopes every year. The bricks will be used to repair damaged houses.

With volcanic ashes and plastic in abundance, officials in Binan see their project as a glimmer of hope.

“During these times, our creativity becomes evident,” said the mayor of Binan, Arman Dimaguila.

During the eruption earlier this month, lightning crackled in the smoke that many officials feared could trigger a tsunami in the lake.

CNN reported that many of the bricks are coming to the cities of Batangas that were devastated by the eruption.

Many houses (pictured) were completely covered with ashes from the eruption, forcing 120,000 people to evacuate the area

Many houses (pictured) were completely covered with ashes from the eruption, forcing 120,000 people to evacuate the area

Many houses (pictured) were completely covered with ashes from the eruption, forcing 120,000 people to evacuate the area

The eruption began with an explosion of steam and overheated rock, but at the beginning of January 12 'lava sources' had been seen in Taal, the volcano monitoring agency said.

The eruption began with an explosion of steam and overheated rock, but at the beginning of January 12 'lava sources' had been seen in Taal, the volcano monitoring agency said.

The eruption began with an explosion of steam and overheated rock, but at the beginning of January 12 ‘lava sources’ had been seen in Taal, the volcano monitoring agency said.

The mayor of Biñan, Arman Dimaguila, said they will send ash bricks to the cities of Calata, Lemery and Agoncillo, in Batangas, when it is safe and the situation stabilizes.

During the eruption earlier this month, lightning crackled in the smoke that many officials feared could trigger a tsunami in the lake.

The eruption began with an explosion of steam and overheated rock, but at the beginning of January 12 ‘lava sources’ had been seen in Taal, the volcano monitoring agency said.

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