Filipino family living in Bell claim that they have deportation because the autistic son taxes the taxpayer

& # 39; We just keep hoping & # 39 ;: Filipino couple faces deportation from Australia because their 11-year-old son suffers from autism and a & # 39; burden & # 39; is for taxpayers

  • Filipino family said they are facing deportation from Bell a city in southern Queensland
  • They claimed it was because son with autism would be tax for taxpayers
  • Geraldine Custodio said the application for a permanent residence permit had been rejected
  • Interior Ministry said it does not comment on individual cases

A Filipino family claims to be deported because their son, who lives with autism, would be a financial burden for Australian taxpayers.

Geraldine and Geofrey Custodio have been living with their four children since 2014 in Bell, a remote town 250 km northwest of Brisbane.

The couple applied for a permanent residence permit hoping to stay in the country and raise their families, ABC reported.

They said the application was rejected because the health care system would not accommodate their 11-year-old son Gain.

According to Australian immigration policy, visas are not issued to anyone if the cost of care exceeds $ 40,000.

Geraldine and Geofrey Custodio lived with their four children in Bell - a remote town 250 km northwest of Brisbane - since 2014 (photo, Geraldine Custodio and partner Geofrey)

Geraldine and Geofrey Custodio lived with their four children in Bell – a remote town 250 km northwest of Brisbane – since 2014 (photo, Geraldine Custodio and partner Geofrey)

Mrs Custodio said that the rejection put pressure on the family.

& # 39; We don't want the boys to blame the special needs of their brother for an unfortunate thing that will happen in our lives, & # 39; she said.

Mrs Custodio compared the services for children with special needs in the Philippines and noted that Australia surpassed the country in that regard.

& # 39; The openness and acceptance of children with special needs is much better here in Australia than in the Philippines. & # 39;

Profit is non-verbal and requires permanent access to services such as speech, psychological and diet therapy.

The family says they are determined to cover the costs themselves and will appeal to the administrative court.

"We just keep going and hope … we'll just have to prove that we deserve it," said Custodio about their permanent residence permit.

Joanne Rodney – who works at the same Bell State School as Mrs. Custodio – said that Gain had made great progress in his development.

& # 39; Since he arrived in 2014, you can just see how far he has come with the stability that this community has given him & # 39 ;, she told the ABC.

She said the parents were big role models in the community – Mrs. Custodio works as a teacher's assistant and has a takeaway and her husband works in a pigsty.

The Interior Ministry said it does not comment on individual cases.

& # 39; Most visas for Australia require that applicants meet the requirements for migration health as set out in Australian migration legislation & # 39 ;, a spokesperson told Daily Mail Austaralia.

& # 39; The health requirement is not condition-specific and the assessment is performed individually for each applicant based on their condition and level of severity.

& # 39; It is an objective assessment to determine whether taking care of the individual during his stay in Australia would likely result in significant costs to the Australian community or affect the access of Australian citizens and permanent residents to deficient services. & # 39;

The family says they are determined to pay the costs of the services themselves and will appeal to the administrative court

The family says they are determined to pay the costs of the services themselves and will appeal to the administrative court

The family says they are determined to pay the costs of the services themselves and will appeal to the administrative court

Advertisement