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In the case of a brain-eating zombie apocalypse, any action can determine your destiny. Do you have to hide? Fight? Call the army? A study can have the answer (stock image)

In the case of a brain-eating zombie apocalypse, any action can determine your destiny. Do you have to hide? Fight? Call the army? A study can have the answer.

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Mathematicians from the University of Sheffield found a better use of their brains than as a zombie chow, and modeled the outcomes of various undead survival tactics.

They discovered that fighting or hiding from the shambolic hordes would ultimately be meaningless – leading to the complete extinction of humanity.

Instead, they claim, the only solution would be to tame individual zombies so that they cannot spread the infection.

Scientists use the same models and approach to study infections in the real world, where it is best to fight diseases that are difficult to cure with vaccinations to stop their spread.

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In the case of a brain-eating zombie apocalypse, any action can determine your destiny. Do you have to hide? Fight? Call the army? A study can have the answer (stock image)

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In the case of a brain-eating zombie apocalypse, any action can determine your destiny. Do you have to hide? Fight? Call the army? A study can have the answer (stock image)

Mathematical biologist Alex Best and colleagues from the University of Sheffield used a type of infection model called an SIR abbreviation for & # 39; Susceptible-Infected-Removed & # 39 ;.

These models are normally used to track the number of people who are vulnerable to infections, carry the disease / spread and recover from a population.

The researchers have adapted this model to compare the number of people, corpses and resuscitated zombies instead – and tested different survival tactics.

Fighting the zombies – or even sending them into the army – didn't work in the long run, they thought, because this led to more zombie infections and the extinction of humanity.

Hiding turned out to be a better solution, allowing people to survive longer – thereby delaying the spread of infections – but ended up with (un) death with everyone.

Because every dead, inverted person contributes to the zombie population, just trying to & # 39; survive & # 39; ensures that humanity will eventually be overwhelmed.

Mathematicians from the University of Sheffield found a better use of their brains than as a zombie chow and modeled the outcomes of various undead survival tactics - such as fighting
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Mathematicians from the University of Sheffield found a better use of their brains than as a zombie chow and modeled the outcomes of various undead survival tactics - such as fighting

Mathematicians from the University of Sheffield found a better use of their brains than as a zombie chow and modeled the outcomes of various undead survival tactics – such as fighting

The team tested different survival tactics and followed the number of people, corpses and resuscitated, infected zombies in a model population (stock image)

The team tested different survival tactics and followed the number of people, corpses and resuscitated, infected zombies in a model population (stock image)

The team tested different survival tactics and followed the number of people, corpses and resuscitated, infected zombies in a model population (stock image)

Instead, the researchers claim that the only way to preserve civilization as we know it is to wipe out the infection – taming the walking dead.

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In their video above, the team presents comically non-aggressive, non-infectious zombies, shambolally integrated into an office environment.

As more undead are neutralized as infectious agents, the & # 39; wild & # 39; zombie populations eventually eliminated, the models found.

In a realistic disease model, the researchers claim, this approach is quite analogous to the process of vaccination against diseases.

Instead of taming infected zombies, however, vaccinations are vaccinated by susceptible people – but both increase the number of & # 39; deleted & # 39; individuals in the model that is no longer available to spread diseases.

Using SIR models, scientists can determine how many people should be vaccinated – or, in the thought experiment, domesticated zombies – to ensure that the infection is not spread.

Fighting the zombies - or even sending them into the army - didn't work in the long run, they thought, because this led to more zombie infections and the extinction of humanity. Pictured, zombies in & # 39; Night of the Living Dead & # 39; by George A. Romero, who establish many popular zombie trends
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Fighting the zombies - or even sending them into the army - didn't work in the long run, they thought, because this led to more zombie infections and the extinction of humanity. Pictured, zombies in & # 39; Night of the Living Dead & # 39; by George A. Romero, who establish many popular zombie trends

Fighting the zombies – or even sending them into the army – didn't work in the long run, they thought, because this led to more zombie infections and the extinction of humanity. Pictured, zombies in & # 39; Night of the Living Dead & # 39; by George A. Romero, who establish many popular zombie trends

"With a dip in vaccinations around the millennium, we've seen infectious diseases such as measles recirculating," Dr. said. Best.

"Using mathematics we can calculate how many people we need to vaccinate to stop the spread of a disease."

Dr. Best and his colleagues, he explained, use precisely this kind of mathematical models to understand how infectious diseases originate, spread and evolve, not only in humans, but also in the natural world. & # 39;

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& # 39; With these models we can explain practical data, make predictions about future outbreaks of disease or control measures and gain a better understanding of the natural environment. & # 39;

The researchers claim that the only way to preserve civilization as we know it is to wipe out the infection - taming the walking dead. In a video, the team presents comically non-aggressive, non-infectious zombies, shambolally integrated into an office environment

The researchers claim that the only way to preserve civilization as we know it is to wipe out the infection - taming the walking dead. In a video, the team presents comically non-aggressive, non-infectious zombies, shambolally integrated into an office environment

The researchers claim that the only way to preserve civilization as we know it is to wipe out the infection – taming the walking dead. In a video, the team presents comically non-aggressive, non-infectious zombies, shambolally integrated into an office environment

The researchers conducted a live-action version of their project at the Green Man music festival 2019, which was held in Crickhowell, in southern Wales, from 15 to 18 August.

To simulate a zombie outbreak, the team gave one person – an undead & # 39; patient zero & # 39; – a load of wristbands to hand out participants and mark them as zombies.

The infected person could then visit the researchers during the festival to learn more about the project and buy wristbands so that they could infect others themselves.

By the end of the festival, more than 2,000 people had turned into zombies, the team reported.

& # 39; The project we presented to the public highlights the exciting possibilities of mathematics and hopefully helps to remove the inherent fear associated with the subject & # 39 ;, said team member and mathematician Fay Frost.

& # 39; With this project we have used a nice familiar concept to represent real research into diseases, conducted at the University of Sheffield. & # 39;

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