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Fight breaks out over an impromptu live music session on a plane

Violinist class! Row breaks out at an impromptu live music session on a plane with some saying they would enjoy it, and others calling it “selfish and very rude.”

A dispute has erupted over whether a violin music session aboard a flight to New York was appropriate, with some calling it “selfish” and “so rude”.

The pop-up music session took place on an Aer Lingus flight from Dublin to JFK over the weekend, just days before St. Patrick’s Day on March 17.

A woman had a violin while a man played an accordion to create the traditional Irish jig as passengers waited to disembark in the Big Apple.

But instead of welcoming the impromptu transatlantic music session, many said it was horrible to subdue other humans.

The video was posted by marketing worker Adam Singer on Twitter.

A row has broken out on Twitter over whether or not it was fair for passengers to have live music on a flight.

He posted on March 12: ‘Aer Lingus flight from Dublin to JFK yesterday. I mean, I get that it’s done from a good place, but I also feel like you don’t play music (or much worse, sing) in an enclosed space from which there is no escape.

And his post caused a great deal of consternation.

Michael Girdley responded: ‘So beautiful. If you ask me, that’s what humanity is all about.

But Adam snapped back, “Sure, but not on a plane.”

And a parent replied: ‘Exactly. This is why I didn’t let my son sing in elevators or subway cars.

“Closed spaces where you can’t just walk away from an artist are the worst.

‘You don’t know what people are going through or can tolerate. Just do it somewhere else please. No captive audiences!

And one added: ‘Humanity is understanding that everything around you is going through things you know nothing about.

'No escape': Sharing the video on Twitter, one social media user wrote that it's unfair to act in a space people can't escape

‘No escape’: Sharing the video on Twitter, one social media user wrote that it’s unfair to act in a space people can’t escape

Many Twitter users felt that the music was inappropriate given the confined space of the plane.

Many Twitter users felt that the music was inappropriate given the confined space of the plane.

‘Humanity is understanding that others may not be in the same head or heart space as you. Humanity is respecting that.

One disagreed, saying: ‘The violin is good anywhere. But they can be my roots. This kind of music makes you happy.

But it was quick to be shot down, with one responding: ‘Okay, but what if you don’t believe it and are forced to listen to this while you want to sleep or work? It’s so rude.

Another said: ‘What about the woman who just said goodbye to her sick mother that she may not see again? Or the couple who just had an abortion? Or the man with PTSD?

Or the man who was on his way to bury his brother? Or people sitting quietly in a can respecting your space assuming you will do the same?’

Another said: ‘I would be yelling at them. No. Why does anyone think this is okay?

One responded: ‘I agree with Adam. It’s very pretty, but it’s not the right place for more than a few moments. He is selfish.

And another criticized: ‘How nice that you do not appreciate what sensory dysfunction is.

However, some thought that people should stop 'whining' and instead try to 'live in the moment'.

However, some thought that people should stop ‘whining’ and instead try to ‘live in the moment’.

“This would have prompted me to attempt an airborne emergency evacuation.”

And one more said, “This is so beautiful for exactly 3 minutes after that, it’s annoying because holding people hostage with music is not cool.”

But one struck back and said: ‘It happened on landing. But many airline routes have had music in the past. Get a grip. The whole world is not about you.

And another added: ‘I’ve never seen so many crybabies… I’m with you Girdley!

These zoomers need to relax, live in the moment, and learn the art of flexibility! No whining!’