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FIFA plans to introduce ROBOT referees for offside decisions in the 2022 World Cup

FIFA plans to introduce ROBOT referees for offside decisions during the 2022 World Cup … and they will take into account the length of different players’ FEET to dismiss controversial calls

  • FIFA plans to introduce new technology for offside decisions in the near future
  • The new ‘robots’ are said to have computer technology to generate excessive ‘lines’
  • The aim of the system is to reduce the time for decision-making and to eliminate controversial calls
  • The length of the feet of players and passive players can be detected by a new system

FIFA plans to introduce the use of robots as assistant referees and plans to implement the new technology in time for the 2022 World Cup.

The technical director of the football board, Johannes Holzmuller, has outlined his plan for the new system, replacing normal assistant referees with computer technology that automatically generates offside lines.

The first ‘robots’ test has already taken place at the December Club World Cup in Qatar, won by Liverpool.

FIFA plans to introduce 'robot' assistant referees for offside decisions

FIFA plans to introduce ‘robot’ assistant referees for offside decisions

The board of football wants to introduce the new system in time for the World Cup 2022

The board of football wants to introduce the new system in time for the World Cup 2022

The board of football wants to introduce the new system in time for the World Cup 2022

“The idea behind the offside technique is to accelerate the assessment of such game situations by the video assistant referee,” Holzmuller explained to German broadcaster ARD. “In fact, the video assistant is no longer creating the lines for offside requests for a possible offside position.

“The principle is that the system automatically creates the lines and triggers an alarm when offside.

“That saves time, so the video assistant can assess the game situations faster when it comes to offside.”

The first trial with 'robot technology' took place at the Club World Cup in Qatar last year

The first trial with 'robot technology' took place at the Club World Cup in Qatar last year

The first trial with ‘robot technology’ took place at the Club World Cup in Qatar last year

FIFA (Video Assistant Referee), the more recent technological introduction of FIFA, has been back in the spotlight in recent days after some lengthy and controversial decisions.

Tomas Soucek was denied a goal for West Ham against Chelsea after VAR believed teammate Michael Antonio’s head was offside after a few-minute review.

It would aim to cut the long waits for offside decisions, as seen in West Ham vs Chelsea

It would aim to cut the long waits for offside decisions, as seen in West Ham vs Chelsea

It would aim to cut the long waits for offside decisions, as seen in West Ham vs Chelsea

The opener by Tomas Soucek was ruled out due to an offside by the head of teammate Michael Antonio

The opener by Tomas Soucek was ruled out due to an offside by the head of teammate Michael Antonio

The opener by Tomas Soucek was ruled out due to an offside by the head of teammate Michael Antonio

It is one of the many cases where excessive calls have been made by a matter of millimeters and the football legislative body IFAB (International Football Association Board) has given the green light to a 10cm ‘tolerance zone’ next season in major leagues.

There is concern that TV cameras do not have a sufficient number of frames per photo to make such close calls, but Holzmuller’s new system aims to put an end to that.

Touching the ball can take less than the time between two frames. It takes several milliseconds. If you are unlucky, the full ball contact will not be shown.

The aim is that the offside technique is more accurate than the television image and the exact moment the ball was delivered. Each system must draw the line in the correct place to see if the body parts that are allowed to score are offside.

The change would replace traditional assistant referees with computer technology

The change would replace traditional assistant referees with computer technology

The change would replace traditional assistant referees with computer technology

It should also take into account different player foot lengths. So far, the techniques tested had only known some sort of average skeleton. The program has yet to learn the differences. ‘

“The system could only determine if players are in an offside position, so things like ‘passive’ players that do not interfere have yet to be determined by the VAR and the referee.

“But with this system, that would be all they had to look at and it would make their final decision much faster. The final decision would be made by them – it should always remain that way. ‘

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