Fierce 50 mph gales to batter Britain in the midst of warnings could quickly follow heavy snow

The Beast blows: Fierce 50 mph gales to batter Britain in the midst of warnings could quickly follow snow with a Beast from the East 2 & # 39; after a mild Christmas and new year

  • North East will have a hard time today and residents can wake up tomorrow with 2 cm of snow
  • Rest of the land can expect 5C temperatures until Wednesday, when mercury plunges to -10C and snow falls
  • Snow and sleet are brought in by rain that fades into the Atlantic Ocean and comes into contact with the cold air in the UK

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The mild start of the UK to the year will come to a bitter cold end, because the country is battered by 50 mph gusts and temperatures drop to -10C by next weekend.

The north-east is hit the hardest by today's winds and residents can wake up to 2cm of snow and icy spots tomorrow morning.

At first glance, low temperatures of 8C seem rather mild, but cold gusts will make it feel more like 4C in parts of Scotland – with the mercury that freezes later tonight.

The rest of the country can expect storms of 30-40 mph, widespread downpours and lows of 10C – which feel much colder by the wind.

It was a turbulent day in the town of Aberystwyth, in Ceredigion, Wales, with winds that pushed huge waves into the boulevard and the locals splattered

Two women are infused with gusts of wind swept up to 50 mph on the boardwalk in Aberystwyth this afternoon

Two women are infused with gusts of wind swept up to 50 mph on the boardwalk in Aberystwyth this afternoon

A surfer on Tynemouth Beach in Tyne and Wear rides huge waves while ferocious winds hit the North East coast

It is expected that the weather will continue until Wednesday, when temperatures drop to -10C, seen in heavy rainfall and snow, according to the Met office.

With predictor Marco Petagna said: & # 39; On Wednesdays we see temperatures in rural areas [in the North East] dip well below freezing.

We can expect temperatures to drop to -5C, or even -10C in some parts of Scotland. The risk of snow during the working week is limited to the North East, but this weekend there is a big chance of widespread snow and frost. & # 39;

There will be 50mph winds and showers today throughout the country before temperatures drop overnight

There will be 50mph winds and showers today throughout the country before temperatures drop overnight

In Schierke, Germany, Harz employees were shown who were trying to repair a train in the midst of snow and freezing temperatures

In Schierke, Germany, Harz employees were shown who were trying to repair a train in the midst of snow and freezing temperatures

Heavy snow will be brought in by rain that tries to enter the ocean and comes into contact with cold air in the UK.

Predictors also warned that an arctic air could turn rain into the snow for northern and central parts of the country later this month after a sudden stratospheric warming.

Although weather conditions are expected to remain stable over the next two weeks, the sudden stratospheric warming in the Arctic, which took place around Christmas, may lead to a wave of cold air and cooler temperatures for the continent.

Sudden warming of the stratosphere could see the beast returning from the east

Heavy conditions that hit England at the beginning of 2018 were a cocktail of weather events & # 39; called.

The cold wave that the & # 39; the beast from the east & # 39; is mentioned – which also coincided with the arrival of Storm Emma – was caused by a high temperature rise above the Arctic, known as "sudden stratospheric warming."

The phenomenon, which usually leads to cold periods in Great Britain, starts 30 miles in the atmosphere in the jet at high altitudes, which usually flows from west to east, bringing relatively warm and wet air from the Atlantic to the UK.

A disturbance hits the jet stream, pushes its waves down to the North Pole and reverses the current from east to west. While the air is being compressed over this area, it starts to warm up.

This leads to high pressure across the North Atlantic and blocks the usual flow of mild air flowing from the west to Great Britain.

Instead, colder air from the East is sucked over the British Isles, resulting in colder temperatures.

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