Female hiker raised the alarm about sinister theory behind tying ribbon to car door

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Sinister warning to solo female walkers as woman fears she was targeted for kidnapping after finding red ribbon on her car

  • Female hiker raises the alarm after finding a red ribbon on the door handle of her car
  • She was going for a walk in Glenbrook, NSW when she found the ribbon and a man nearby
  • Ribbon tying is reportedly used by criminals to distract and kidnap women

A female bushwalker has shared the terror she got from being targeted by a trick she read online that was used to lure females into a potentially dangerous trap.

The woman posted on Facebook that she had returned to her car from the Knapsack Stairs hiking trail at the foot of the Blue Mountains in Glenbrook, New South Wales, to find a piece of red ribbon wrapped around her car door handle.

She immediately raised the alarm for ‘anyone bushwalking alone’ after her suspicious discovery.

She had read that predators used the tactic of binding something around the door handles to slow the process of victims getting into their cars, giving them time to kidnap or attack them.

A female hiker at the knapsack stairs walkway in Glenbrook warned when she had a string wrapped around the door handle of her car.

Other women in the United States have also seen red ribbon on their vehicles allegedly used to distract and kidnap drivers (pictured)

Other women in the United States have also seen red ribbon on their vehicles allegedly used to distract and kidnap drivers (pictured)

“ I’ve seen people do this online to distract you when you go to the car so you take the time to check it out and unplug it, ” she wrote on Facebook.

“There was a man near my car then and when he saw my partner, he walked away.”

She also called the Penrith Police Department who reportedly sent police patrols to the area to investigate.

The female walker has issued a warning to other women to ‘stay safe’ and ‘be aware’ of the potential risks.

“If you see a ribbon on your door handle, avoid the car and seek help.”

The woman was returning from the knapsack stairway walkway in Glenbrook (pictured) when she found a ribbon tied to her car and a man near her vehicle

The woman was returning from the knapsack stairway walkway in Glenbrook (pictured) when she found a ribbon tied to her car and a man near her vehicle

NSW police told the Daily Mail that they have no comment on the alleged incident.

An American TikToker named Shannon, 20, recently shared a video online after she left a mall parking lot and saw strings wrapped around the door handles on two cars.

‘WTF is this a joke? Someone better not be kidnapped, ”she wrote.

She soon saw another car with a similar piece of material, including on the door handle on the driver’s side.

‘We found a second one. I’m getting out of here, ”she wrote.

But the theory that ribbons are used to aid in the abduction of women has been debunked by some – with US authorities calling the 2019 allegations “ ludicrous ”.

TikTok users shared a widespread theory that kidnappers tie a string to car door handles in an attempt to kidnap vulnerable women.

TikTok users shared a widespread theory that kidnappers tie a string to car door handles in an attempt to kidnap vulnerable women.

Is tying something to a car door really a tactic used by criminals?

The idea that criminals and kidnappers tie something around a car’s door handle to distract them and keep them out of their car has long been warned on social media.

It started in 2015 when Facebook users started warning that sex traffickers would use the trick to kidnap women.

According to the Poynter Institute, local police in a Canadian town where the mail came from said there were no reports of sex traffickers using the zip-tie device in the mail.

Meanwhile, the site also reported that nonprofits fighting human trafficking said the zip tie method had not been identified as a trend.

At the time, the FBI declined to comment on whether it was a method they were investigating, or even aware of in the US.

In December 2019, local police departments in Texas and Michigan assured residents that they had received no complaints about attaching zippers to cars, following numerous warnings on social media, but neither department confirmed or denied whether the tactic was legitimate .

Celia Williamson, director of the Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute at the University of Toledo in Ohio, called the claims “ ludicrous, ” but no authority has commented on the broader use of the tactic among other criminal groups.

Lt. Brian Oleksyk told WILX: ‘It’s essentially like an urban legend or a scare-lore. The whole idea of ​​the intention is to scare people. ‘

‘Usually human traffickers use a computer online or it is someone they already know from a previous relationship or a peer-to-peer. It is very rare for them to hunt a stranger. ‘

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