Federal judge blocks Trump's birth control rules, which grant new cover exemptions

The Pennsylvania federal judge is blocking the birth control rules of Trump administration that grant new exemptions for cover because "moral beliefs & # 39; are in force NATIONWIDE

  • A federal judge in Pennsylvania has blocked President Donald Trump's new rules on birth control of employers to come into force across the country
  • New rules would extend the exemptions for birth control coverage of employers with "moral beliefs & # 39; as a basis to no longer provide
  • The rules would apply everywhere on Monday, but are now being postponed
  • The Californian federal judge Haywood Gilliam has filed a petition for interim relief in California, 12 other states and Washington DC on Sunday

Stephanie Haney for Dailymail.com

A US judge in Pennsylvania Monday blocked President Donald Trump's government rules, allowing more employers to offer women free contraception by claiming their moral convictions & # 39; violates across the country.

US District Court Judge Wendy Beetlestone for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania temporarily stalled the new extended exemption rules to take effect on Monday while being challenged before the court in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Beetlestone said in the ruling that loss of birth control due to the maintenance of the rule could lead to "significant, direct and proprietary damage." to the states by making greater use of government-funded contraceptive services.

Judge Haywood Gilliam, a district judge from the United States of the US District Court for the Northern District of California, filed a petition for temporary injunctions in only California, 12 other states, and Washington DC on Sunday.

The law can not be clearer – employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday.

Gilliam limited the scope of the ruling to the plaintiffs in the Californian case, but the order from Beetlestone has now temporarily blocked the rules across the country.

A US judge in Pennsylvania forbade President Donald Trump's government rules on Monday, allowing more employers to offer women free contraception by claiming their moral convictions & # 39; violates to enter into force across the country. President Donald Trump is spoken Monday at the 100th annual convention of the American Farm Bureau Federation in New Orleans

A US judge in Pennsylvania forbade President Donald Trump's government rules on Monday, allowing more employers to offer women free contraception by claiming their moral convictions & # 39; violates to enter into force across the country. President Donald Trump is spoken Monday at the 100th annual convention of the American Farm Bureau Federation in New Orleans

As a result of the changes, more employers, including listed companies, could opt to offer women a free contraception by claiming religious objections.

Some private employers could also object on moral grounds.

Opponents of the rules are changing that women are forced to turn to state-funded programs for contraception and experiencing unintentional pregnancies.

& Today's ruling ceases a new attempt by the Trump administration to trample women's access to basic reproductive care, Becerra said on Sunday.

& # 39; It's 2019, but the Trump government is still trying to turn women's rights back.

"Our coalition will continue to fight to ensure that women have access to reproductive health services guaranteed by law."

The law can not be clearer - employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday. Becerra is pictured on October 10 in Sacramento, California

The law can not be clearer - employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday. Becerra is pictured on October 10 in Sacramento, California

The law can not be clearer – employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday. Becerra is pictured on October 10 in Sacramento, California

At a hearing on Friday, Judge Haywood Gilliam said that the changes would result in a "substantial number". women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy change & # 39; would be. This picture shows a woman carrying a contraceptive pill on January 3, 2013

At a hearing on Friday, Judge Haywood Gilliam said that the changes would result in a "substantial number". women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy change & # 39; would be. This picture shows a woman carrying a contraceptive pill on January 3, 2013

At a hearing on Friday, Judge Haywood Gilliam said that the changes would result in a "substantial number". women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy change & # 39; would be. This picture shows a woman carrying a contraceptive pill on January 3, 2013

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs.

At issue is a requirement under the health care law of President Barack Obama that birth control services are covered at no additional cost.

Obama officials included waivers for religious organizations. The Trump administration expanded these exemptions and added 'moral beliefs & # 39; as a basis for no longer offering birth control services.

During a hearing on Friday, Gilliam said the changes would result in a "substantial number of & # 39; women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy shift & # 39; would be.

The judge in California previously blocked an interim version of the rules – a decision that was confirmed by a court of appeal in December.

Trump & # 39; s administration released the final version of the rules in November, with minor changes compared to previously blocked intermin rules.

That updated, final version is now being challenged by courts across the country.

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs. Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, Louisiana, wore a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the American Supreme Court in Washington, DC on March 25, 2015

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs. Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, Louisiana, wore a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the American Supreme Court in Washington, DC on March 25, 2015

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs. Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, Louisiana, wore a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the American Supreme Court in Washington, DC on March 25, 2015

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