Fears of public safety, as dozens of dangerous prisoners are taken to the hospital with trivial ailments

Inmates are being taken to public hospitals with minor ailments such as cuts and lip bites due to lack of qualification of medical personnel within Australian prisons.

Fears for public safety, since dozens of dangerous prisoners are regularly taken to the hospital from jail with minor ailments, such as cuts, stitches and bitten lips.

  • Up to 40 inmates are taken per day to hospitals in New South Wales with minor illnesses
  • An inmate was taken to the emergency room at midnight with a boil in the back
  • The figures have caused fears of public safety after two incidents in the last year
  • A prisoner escaped from a Newcastle hospital while he was still handcuffed in 2017

Charlie Coe for Daily Mail Australia

Up to 40 prisoners per day are accompanied to public hospitals with minor cuts, elimination of stitches and bitten lips, with insufficiently qualified medical personnel from the prison who can not serve them in jail.

The numbers have prompted fears from Australian Public Service Corrections (PSA) official David McCauley that the lack of registered nurses would endanger the public and the agents.

A survey of prison officials revealed that many trips were made for non-urgent illnesses, including an inmate who was taken to the emergency room at midnight after a boil on his back.

Inmates are being taken to public hospitals with minor ailments such as cuts and lip bites due to lack of qualification of medical personnel within Australian prisons.

Inmates are being taken to public hospitals with minor ailments such as cuts and lip bites due to lack of qualification of medical personnel within Australian prisons.

According to The Daily Telegraph, Mr. McCauley said: "It's not about denying them the right to medical care, it's about the safety of officers and patients.

"It's also about not using occasional and inexperienced officers in escorts."

Officers at the Silverwater Metropolitan Detention Center carry up to 40 inmates every day to nearby hospitals and Long Bay Jail also states that inmates were often taken out of prison to remove stitches.

Corrections officer David McCauley said the prison's medical facilities should be checked so that public safety is not jeopardized, following the escape of inmate John Way (pictured) while waiting to be treated at a public hospital. Newcastle

Corrections officer David McCauley said the prison's medical facilities should be checked so that public safety is not jeopardized, following the escape of inmate John Way (pictured) while waiting to be treated at a public hospital. Newcastle

Corrections officer David McCauley said the prison's medical facilities should be checked so that public safety is not jeopardized, following the escape of inmate John Way (pictured) while waiting to be treated at a public hospital. Newcastle

Way's escape included leaping from a rooftop, prompting a woman to break her leg when she chased him, prompting the Australian Public Service to request a review of the prison's medical facilities.

Way's escape included leaping from a rooftop, prompting a woman to break her leg when she chased him, prompting the Australian Public Service to request a review of the prison's medical facilities.

Way's escape included leaping from a rooftop, prompting a woman to break her leg when she chased him, prompting the Australian Public Service to request a review of the prison's medical facilities.

McCauley's comments come after prison officer Timothy Thornton received a formal warning after he was caught lying in a hospital bed in July while an inmate was being treated at the Dubbo hospital.

Last year's inmate John Way, 36, who was behind bars for assault and other offenses, escaped from the waiting room of a Newcastle hospital and was found in a nearby bush after an intensive police search.

Way's escape included jumping off a rooftop, which led a woman to break her leg when she chased him.

After the incident, a PSA spokesman said that none of the officers escorting Way that day should have been on duty, as they were strangers with no experience.

The union also said it wanted the NSW state government to review the quality of medical services in jail so fewer inmates had to leave the prison confines for treatment.

A spokeswoman for Justice Health, speaking in the Daily Telegraph, said there were extensive health services in jail and that prisoners were only transferred to local hospitals "when specialist or emergency care is required."

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