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Fears of millions of new homes will be high with the upheaval in government planning

Massive developments could take place without full consultation of the local population under the radical revision of the current planning system by the government, experts fear.

Boris Johnson plans to radically change the process as part of a ‘once-in-a-generation’ reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas for ‘growth’, areas for ‘renewal’ and others for ‘protection’ ‘.

In ‘growth areas’, new homes, hospitals, schools, shops and offices are automatically approved for development.

But experts are concerned that the reforms may “put the public consultation aside” or deter developers if they try to understand the new, complex rules.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said the current ‘complex and slow’ system used by developers and homeowners to ask for permission to build ‘has been an obstacle to building affordable homes, where families want to raise children and live their lives build up’.

But the rural charity CPRE has warned that the government’s reform plans seem like a “gross simplification of the planning system”.

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said that the current 'complex and slow' planning system used by developers and homeowners to ask for permission to build 'has been an obstacle to building affordable homes, where families want to raise children and live their lives build up'

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said that the current ‘complex and slow’ planning system used by developers and homeowners to ask for permission to build ‘has been an obstacle to building affordable homes, where families want to raise children and live their lives build up’

James Jamieson, president of the Local Government Association, said The mirror“It is critical that reforms provide adequate protection so that residents have the power to shape the area in which they live.”

He said more than a million properties have not yet been built – although they have received planning permission in the past ten years.

He added that about 90 percent of the properties have been approved, he added, suggesting that planning applications don’t stop developers.

Mark Crane of the District Council Network said, “We cannot compromise on the quality of new homes and places and override the public consultation that we fear will result from the reforms.”

Boris Johnson plans to radically change the process as part of a 'once-in-a-generation' reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas for 'growth', areas for 'renewal' and others for 'protection' '

Boris Johnson plans to radically change the process as part of a 'once-in-a-generation' reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas for 'growth', areas for 'renewal' and others for 'protection' '

Boris Johnson plans to radically change the process as part of a ‘once-in-a-generation’ reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas for ‘growth’, areas for ‘renewal’ and others for ‘protection’ ‘

Shelter CEO Polly Neate said, “Home builders risk becoming insecure if they try to understand the new system and its significance for their plans – just as the construction industry is going through a massive economic downturn.”

Tom Fyans, director of campaigns and policies at CPRE, the national charity, added the reforms “sound like a gross simplification of the planning system.”

He said, “First of all, our planning process should respond to the needs of communities, both in providing much-needed affordable homes and other vital infrastructure, as well as green spaces for our health and well-being.

“The planning process in its current form may not be perfect, but instead of deregulating planning, the government needs to invest in planning. Quality development needs a quality planning system where community participation is central.

“The Secretary of State has claimed that these planning reforms will still be very ‘people-oriented’, but that goes against what the government has outlined today.

“We are eagerly awaiting more details and will join forces with a range of other housing, planning and environmental campaigns organizations to work hard on the deregulation agenda, which has never been the answer to how best to stimulate economic growth . ”

Experts who have reforms can `` push aside '' the public consultation or scare the developers together while trying to understand the new complex rules (file image)

Experts who have reforms can `` push aside '' the public consultation or scare the developers together while trying to understand the new complex rules (file image)

Experts who have reforms can “ push aside ” the public consultation or scare the developers together while trying to understand the new complex rules (file image)

The reforms are the backbone of the Prime Minister’s promise to “build, build, build” to reboot the economy as the country tries to escape from a closed state.

Register the Sunday Telegraph Pending a consultation to be launched next week, Mr Jenrick has also unveiled plans for a “digital transformation” that allows residents to view plans for their area through online maps, rather than viewing “street lamp announcements.”

At this point, it could take five years for a standard residential area to get a green light “before there is a shovel in the ground,” he said.

Mr Jenrick believes that this process can be reduced to two years.

He claimed that the new reforms would also create thousands of new jobs in construction and architecture. Mr Jenrick also claimed that the bureaucracy has delayed the construction of new hospitals and schools and improved roads.

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which country should be reserved for growth, renewal or protection before the municipalities make their final decision.

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which land should be reserved for growth, renewal or protection before the municipalities make their final decision

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which land should be reserved for growth, renewal or protection before the municipalities make their final decision

As part of the new system, residents are asked to give their opinion on which land should be reserved for growth, renewal or protection before the municipalities make their final decision

Areas designated for renewal have an ‘in principle permission’ approach – meaning that construction works can still be completed quickly after checks have been carried out.

Most of these areas will be urban and brownfield locations.

Protected land includes the ‘Green Belt, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and rich heritage,’ said Mr. Jenrick.

He acknowledged that people would be concerned after ‘streets of identikit,’ anywheresville ‘homes have become the norm,’ but emphasized the new plan ‘values ​​quality and design more than ever before and draws inspiration from the idea of ​​design codes and patterns books’.

A series of standards ensure that new houses are built in the same style as others in the area.

Under a policy note entitled Planning for the Future – to be released next week – plans will also allow key workers to prioritize housing through their municipal councils, The Sunday Times reports.

Developer funds will also be reused to allow discounts on house prices for locals – in an effort to get more people up the property ladder.

Those who want to build their own homes from the ground will be helped to find local land.

A Conservative Party source told the newspaper, “Once a local plan is approved and zoning plans are completed, it is much more difficult to block new development.

“But the downside is that the home in question must be in accordance with local designs and have amenities for schools and physicians that make it attractive to live and do not detract from existing public services.”

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