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FBI raids home of Justice Department official Jeffrey Clark, who pushed Trump election fraud claims

Federal agents on Wednesday raided the home of Jeffrey Clark, a senior Justice Department official who pushed Donald Trump’s baseless electoral fraud claims as part of a wide-ranging federal investigation into last year’s attack on the United States Capitol.

It came a day before the House Jan. 6 committee was due to draw attention to Trump’s failed attempts to put pressure on Justice Department officials and a plan to install Clark as attorney general.

According to several reports, they arrived at his home in suburban Virginia in the early morning.

An ally, Russ Vought, head of the Office of Management and Budget at the Trump White House, said Clark should be out on the street in his pajamas.

“The new era of criminalization of politics is worsening in the US,” Vought tweeted.

“Yesterday, more than a dozen DOJ law enforcement officers searched Jeff Clark’s home during a predawn raid, kicked him out in his pajamas, and took his electronic devices.”

Clark’s attorneys did not respond to requests for comment.

Federal agents reportedly searched the home of Jeffrey Clark, a former Justice Department attorney who was considering installing former President Donald Trump as attorney general in the days before the Jan. 6 Capitol riot as part of an effort to to cancel the elections.

Federal agents reportedly searched the home of Jeffrey Clark, a former Justice Department attorney who was considering installing former President Donald Trump as attorney general in the days before the Jan. 6 Capitol riot as part of an effort to to cancel the elections.

Thursday's Jan. 6 committee hearing will examine the Justice Department's role in Trump loyalists' efforts to reverse the outcome of the 2020 election

Thursday’s Jan. 6 committee hearing will examine the Justice Department’s role in Trump loyalists’ efforts to reverse the outcome of the 2020 election

Bill Miller, a spokesman for the US law firm in Washington, confirmed on Wednesday the existence of law enforcement activity in Lorton, Virginia, where Clark lives, but declined to comment on the target.

Thursday’s hearing is expected to examine Clark’s alleged role in helping Trump use the Justice Department in key swing states to alter election results.

In the days leading up to the January 6 violence, Trump was considering a proposal to appoint Clark as acting attorney general.

Emails previously released by the Jan. 6 commission reveal how Clark suggested sending a letter to officials in Georgia falsely claiming the Justice Department had evidence of voter fraud that would help Joe Biden win the state. can reverse.

His letter to Republican Governor Brian Kemp urged him to convene a special session of the Georgian legislature to create a separate list of voters who support Trump.

“History is calling,” Clark, a relatively young official, told the president at the White House on Jan. 3, according to a statement from Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue and an excerpt from a court file.

‘This is our chance. We can make this happen.’

In the event, Trump decided not to promote Clark amid warnings that hundreds of DOJ officials would resign if he did.

Donoghue will testify before the U.S. House of Representatives selection committee Thursday afternoon, which includes then-acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and former assistant attorney general in the office of legal counsel Steven Engel.

They are expected to say that the DOJ has not received any evidence of widespread fraud that could have influenced the outcome of the election.

Trump's acting attorney general during the Capitol riot Jeff Rosen will testify before the Jan. 6 select committee on Thursday that there has never been any solid evidence to support Donald Trump's claims of voter fraud.  “Some argued to the former president and the public that the election was corrupt and stolen.  That opinion was wrong then and it is wrong today, and I hope our presence here today helps reaffirm that fact,

Trump’s acting attorney general during the Capitol riot Jeff Rosen will testify before the Jan. 6 select committee on Thursday that there has never been any solid evidence to support Donald Trump’s claims of voter fraud. “Some argued to the former president and the public that the election was corrupt and stolen. That opinion was wrong then and it is wrong today, and I hope our presence here today helps reaffirm that fact,” he said in a prepared statement.

Former Deputy Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue

Ex-Trump DOJ Attorney Steven Engel

Rosen’s ex-deputy Richard Donoghue and former Trump attorney Steven Engel will testify on Thursday during the fifth day of the hearings. Donoghue will give his warning to Trump that ‘hundreds’ of DOJ employees would quit if he tried to replace Rosen with someone who would back up his fraud claims

“Some argued to the former president and the public that the election was corrupt and stolen,” Rosen said in a prepared statement to the panel obtained by the Associated Press.

“That image was wrong then and it is wrong now, and I hope our presence here today helps reaffirm that fact.”

The commission’s deputy chair, Liz Cheney, denounced the proposed letter in her opening statement as a lie.

“In fact, the Justice Department had repeatedly told President Trump to the contrary, that they had investigated his stolen election allegations and found no credible fraud that could influence the outcome of the election.” she said.

Thursday’s hearing is the fifth this month and will prove how Trump tried to use the department for his own ends.

In a fiery speech outside the White House on Jan. 6, Trump urged his supporters to reverse his election defeat.

They later stormed the Capitol, sending lawmakers and Vice President Mike Pence on the run for their lives.

Four people died, one shot by police and the others of natural causes.

More than 800 people have now been arrested in connection with the violence.

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