FBI kills the woman who led false adoption services, sending thousands of desperate prospective parents to flee

Tara Lynn Lee, 37, from New Haven, Michigan, was summoned to the federal court on Friday for charges of fraudulent fraud in connection with a fake adoption agency

Tara Lynn Lee, 37, from New Haven, Michigan, was summoned to the federal court on Friday for charges of fraudulent fraud in connection with a fake adoption agency

A woman in Michigan is charged with fraud after a study of claims that she has taken care of hopeful adoptive parents of tens of thousands of dollars in fees, but never produced babies for them.

Tara Lynn Lee, 37, of New Haven, Michigan, was convicted in the federal court on Friday for wiring payment after she surrendered to the FBI.

Authorities claim that Lee led an unapproved adoption service from her home, collected various allowances from the adoptive parents after she & # 39; matches & # 39; between them had made and fake pregnant women, and then said that the adoption fell and large parts of the costs were kept.

The criminal complaint, obtained by WXYZ, claimed that Lee collected approximately $ 10,000 to $ 33,000 in allowance from the adoptive parents at the time of the alleged parent matches before birth, with additional payment due at the time of approval. & # 39;

Lee would then reportedly & # 39; matches & # 39; have made between so-called pregnant women and hopeful adoptants, although the birth mother that Lee spoke about & # 39; not really pregnant, not interested in adoption, or fictional, according to the complaint.

Lee had been examined for months and her house was attacked in November

Lee had been examined for months and her house was attacked in November

Lee had been examined for months and her house was attacked in November

Authorities claimed that Lee could have cheated 80 families from 26 states

Authorities claimed that Lee could have cheated 80 families from 26 states

Authorities claimed that Lee could have cheated 80 families from 26 states

On other occasions, Lee would have told two sets of adoptive parents that a biological mother has picked them out and receives payment from both. & # 39;

Lee had been in research for several months, with FBI agents rushing into her home in November 2018.

The families that Lee said were made pregnant by Always Hope come from across the US, especially Georgia, Missouri, South Carolina, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Colorado and Minnesota.

It is thought that they could have cheated 80 families from 26 states.

Authorities said that during the alleged scam Lee was known for texting photos of echo & # 39; s and presumed mothers to adoptive parents, as well as text messages such as "Happy Father's Day !!!" She chose Y & # 39; All, & # 39; according to the Detroit Free Press.

After collecting the thousands of allowances, the government said that Lee would tell the hopeful parents stories about how the often-made mothers changed their minds at the last moment, or in one case told a couple that the biological mother had been shot deadly before to ask if they wanted to contribute to funeral payments.

When repayments were requested, Lee would have held a large share of the payments to cover the counseling and other needs of the biological mother.

The authorities said that Lee presented herself as a social worker with a graduate degree in social work from Northwestern University - neither was true

The authorities said that Lee presented herself as a social worker with a graduate degree in social work from Northwestern University - neither was true

The authorities said that Lee presented herself as a social worker with a graduate degree in social work from Northwestern University – neither was true

Lee then advertised adoption opportunities in her network of adoption agencies

Lee then advertised adoption opportunities in her network of adoption agencies

Lee then advertised adoption opportunities in her network of adoption agencies

The Ohio woman Stacey Markley (pictured with her partner) was one of the adoptive parents whom Lee reportedly deceived, who is mentioned in the criminal charge

The Ohio woman Stacey Markley (pictured with her partner) was one of the adoptive parents whom Lee reportedly deceived, who is mentioned in the criminal charge

The Ohio woman Stacey Markley (pictured with her partner) was one of the adoptive parents whom Lee reportedly deceived, who is mentioned in the criminal charge

The long criminal complaint stated that Lee claimed to be a qualified social worker with a master's degree in social work from Northwestern University – neither of which was true – and then offered adoptive adoption opportunities to her network of adoption agencies.

When the hopeful parents responded to the ad with information about themselves, Lee reportedly told the parents they had been picked and collected the $ 10,000 to $ 33,000 from them, claiming that more money would be paid when the adoption was completed.

Lee would have enslaved the parents in two ways, either in a 'double match' scheme – where two families were compared to the same biological mother – or a & # 39; manufactured match & # 39; schedule, in which no mother's mother was beginning with or the birth mother had no interest in putting her baby for adoption.

The authorities have described several specific examples of how adoptive families were allegedly deceived by Lee in their complaint.

In one case, a couple from Colorado were told they had to pay $ 19,000 to ensure the adoption of a baby that would be available, which they did by making four separate payments to Lee by telephone. They were then told that they would have to pay more at a later date.

Three days later, Lee would have called a Minnesota mother to say that she had found a baby for them-the same baby the Colorado pair had just sent.

The pair from Minnesota would have paid Lee's asking price of $ 20,000 immediately on the phone.

In the course of several months, Lee sent both the Colorado and Minnesota couples text messages and talked to them over the phone and informed them about the biological mother. Neither couple ever spoke to the supposed biological mother.

Two days before the birth of the supposed baby, the Colorado couple rode to Michigan, so they could pick up the baby, just because Lee apparently told them a few days later that the mother had changed her mind and would keep the child.

Lee then told the Colorado couple that she had other adoption options and informed them that some of the $ 19,000 they had paid would be rolled over to pay for a future adoption.

When they asked for their money instead, Lee paid $ 9,000. The remaining $ 10,000, she claims, claimed it was used for life coaching and counseling of the biological mother, pre-birth counseling and transportation and the cost of the biological mother.

At the same time, the authorities said Lee told the Minnesota couple that the biological mother had delivered the child and decided to keep it, and offered to transfer their $ 20,000 to a future adoption.

When none of the adoption options bulged out, the couple asked for a refund, which has not yet been released, according to the FBI.

A Georgia couple was meanwhile involved in the fake scenario of the fatally shot birth mother.

In that situation, Lee told the Georgia couple that the mother mom & # 39; RaShaunda & # 39; to come on June 20th. But on June 12, Lee told the couple that RaShaunda had been killed and that the baby had died on her way to the hospital.

When Lee asked if the couple wanted to donate money to RaShaunda's burial fund, the couple said they were suspicious and asked for a refund, which posed a threat to legal action.

Lee then gave them a check for $ 8,550.

In the investigation, the FBI ruled that there was no RaShaunda and that the Facebook photo of the woman who reportedly claimed to be the birth mother, an unknown, who had never been pregnant, did not know Lee and had never been shot.

An Ohio woman, Stacey Markley, was one of the adoptive parents whom Lee reportedly deceived, who is mentioned in the criminal charge.

Markley told WXYZ that after they had signed the adoption contract with Lee, they had sent an ultrasound, but that no name was attached to the picture to show that it was the biological mother's child and that they never had a pregnancy test received from a doctor.

Lee's lawyers told the news station that Lee only acted as an advocate for birth mothers and that her name was not present in adoption legislation.

Lee was out of prison, but had to turn her passport around because she would fly to Africa next week. She is also forbidden to do any work with regard to adoption, pregnancy or counseling and should stay away from hospitals and birth centers.

The state of Michigan is expected to appear in court Monday, to prevent it from doing adoption work, as it has no state license to match families with babies.

Always Hope Pregnancy and Education Center was examined by the state in 2015 and 2018. On both occasions, it appeared that Lee provided unapproved adoption services.

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