Fauxliage photo book reveals how US cell towers are disguised as fake trees and cacti

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Fascinating new photo book reveals how US cell towers are cleverly disguised as fake palms, fake cacti and even fake church crosses

  • The mesmerizing images can be found in the book Fauxliage, by photographer Annette LeMay Burke
  • She writes that some disguises are so obviously fake that they draw attention to themselves
  • In the foreword, Ann M. Jastrabgame says that some of the photos resemble a game of “Where’s Waldo?”

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In the American West, ugly cell towers are cunningly disguised to blend in with their surroundings, as shown in an intriguing new book by photographer Annette LeMay Burke.

false binding (Daylight Books) is a collection of fascinating landscape images showing the country’s telephone masts camouflaged as peculiar fake palms, giant cacti and even church crosses.

In the foreword, Ann M. Jastrab, executive director of the Center for Photographic Art in Carmel, California, says: “At first I saw picturesque landscapes. But wait, what happened to these views? Something was wrong. There were giant saguaro cacti, palm trees reflected in crystal clear pools and a towering pine tree in an arid desert. What was a pine tree doing in the middle of the Mojave Desert with not even a tuft of grass around? I looked a little closer. These weren’t real living trees at all…

‘I couldn’t help but laugh and look again, also taking my hat off to the brilliant title. It almost became a game of “Where’s Waldo?” in some images.’

Meanwhile, Annette writes in the book, “While I was initially drawn to the whimsical look of the towers, the more I photographed them, the more dismayed I felt that technology was secretly changing our environment. Would our children soon accept these towers as normal?’

Scroll down to see the unique creations in our selection of the tome photos…

Annette spotted this trio of cell towers disguised as towering palm trees in Palm Springs, California.  The photographer argues that fake foliage 'draws more attention to itself than camouflage offers'

Annette spotted this trio of cell towers disguised as towering palm trees in Palm Springs, California. The photographer argues that fake foliage ‘draws more attention to itself than camouflage offers’

A Giant Faux Cactus Plant Partly Hides a Telephone Mast in Phoenix, Arizona

A Giant Faux Cactus Plant Partly Hides a Telephone Mast in Phoenix, Arizona

The fake trees have been called

The fake trees have been called “frankenpines.” This photo was taken in Provo, Utah

This photo from Annette's new photo book was taken in Barstow, California.  Annette says: 'Although I was initially drawn to the erratic appearances of the towers, the more I photographed them, the more dismayed I felt that technology was clandestinely changing our environment.  Would our children soon accept these towers as normal?'

This photo from Annette’s new photo book was taken in Barstow, California. Annette says: ‘Although I was initially drawn to the whimsical look of the towers, the more I photographed them, the more disconcerted I felt that technology was secretly changing our environment. Would our children soon accept these towers as normal?’

Pictured is a well-camouflaged telephone mast in Palo Alto, California

Pictured is a well-camouflaged telephone mast in Palo Alto, California

A telephone pole with a palm tree aesthetic in a drive-thru in La Mesa, California

A telephone pole with a palm tree aesthetic in a drive-thru in La Mesa, California

The above image shows a telephone tower disguised as a pine tree in Gorman, California

The above image shows a telephone tower disguised as a pine tree in Gorman, California

Annette took the above image in Henderson, Nevada.  She writes: 'While the quirky disguises can be fun to look at, the towers present privacy and environmental concerns.  The poles' often farcical disguise belies the equipment's covert ability to collect all the personal data sent by our cell phones.

Annette took the above image in Henderson, Nevada. She writes: ‘While the quirky disguises can be fun to look at, the towers present privacy and environmental concerns. The poles’ often farcical disguise belies the equipment’s secret ability to collect all the personal data sent by our cell phones.

Some of the telephone towers in the book are so cleverly hidden that they are difficult to spot.  This photo was taken in San Lorenzo, California

This photo was taken in Calimesa, California

Some of the telephone towers in the book are so cleverly hidden that they are difficult to spot. The image on the left was taken in San Lorenzo, California, and the image on the right in Calimesa, in the same condition

Annette.  Ann M. Jastrab writes in the foreword about this photo: 'The Holy Trinity in the local church is really three cell phone towers?  I am not religious, but this may be a form of profanity.  Or genius, because the mobile phone companies pay the church good money to plant it there'

Annette discovered these telephone mast crosses in Mesa, Arizona. Ann M. Jastrab writes in the foreword about this photo: ‘The Holy Trinity in the local church is really three cell phone towers? I am not religious, but this may be a form of profanity. Or genius, because the mobile phone companies pay the church good money to plant it there’

A sculpture of a bison hides a telephone tower on the border between Wyoming and Colorado

A sculpture of a bison hides a telephone tower on the border between Wyoming and Colorado

Fauxliage, by Annette LeMay Burke and published by Daylight Books, is available now for $45.00 / CAN $58.99

Fauxliage, by Annette LeMay Burke and published by Daylight Books, is now available for US$45.00 / CAN $58.99

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