Fauci warns of spread of Indian ‘Delta’ variant as number of COVID-19 cases increased by 30% in one week

The country’s top infectious disease expert warned that the spread of India’s ‘Delta’ coronavirus variant is driving cases across the country.

In an appearance on CBS this morning on Monday, dr. Anthony Fauci classified the variant, which is responsible for more than half of all new infections, as “a really bad actor virus.”

He told host Gayle King that the speed at which the Delta variant transmits is very concerning.

‘First of all, the concern is that the virus itself can be transmitted much more easily from person to person. We know that from experience in our country and in several other countries, so you’re dealing with a really bad actor virus,” he said.

Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said — with only 48 percent of Americans fully vaccinated against COVID-19 — that much of the population is now vulnerable to infection from the variant.

“Given the number of people in the country who have not been vaccinated, that’s a real concern because the vaccines we have available… are doing very well against the Delta variant, especially protecting against serious illnesses leading to hospitalization.” lead,” he added.

“We’re concerned about those regions of the country, those states, those areas, those cities where the vaccination level is really really low, around 30 percent or so.”

It comes as the US sees a surge in COVID-19 infections, with 6,164 new cases on Sunday, a 30 percent increase from 4,739 recorded last Sunday.

Last week, the country reported 135,802 new cases. That’s the fifth day in a row that the weekly total has hit six digits and peaked at 45 percent from seven days ago, when 93,134 cases were recorded in a week.

In addition, states like Missouri and Arkansas — which have some of the lowest vaccination rates in the country — see the highest per capita weekly disease rates as the Delta variant rips through their communities.

dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease expert, referred to India’s ‘Delta’ Covid variant as a ‘really bad actor virus’ on CBS This Morning (above) on Monday.

Fauci said the spread of the Delta variant, which accounts for more than half of all cases (above), is of concern because it is more contagious and will therefore continue to spread in communities with low vaccination rates.

Fauci said the spread of the Delta variant, which accounts for more than half of all cases (above), is of concern because it is more contagious and will therefore continue to spread in communities with low vaccination rates.

COVID-19 cases are up 30% in one week in the US from 4,739 infections registered last Sunday to 6,164 new cases this Sunday

COVID-19 cases are up 30% in one week in the US from 4,739 infections registered last Sunday to 6,164 new cases this Sunday

According to CDC data updated last week, the Delta variant, also known as B.1.617.2, accounts for 51.7 percent of all new infections.

That’s more than the 26.1 percent of cases previously linked to the variant, meaning the prevalence has nearly doubled in two weeks.

The Delta variant has been found in all 50 states and is responsible for more than 80 percent of new infections in Midwestern states such as Iowa, Kansas and Missouri, where vaccination rates are lagging.

At least half of states have seen COVID-19 cases rise as the variant spreads, a DailyMail.com analysis of Johns Hopkins data found earlier last week.

Missouri remains the nation’s Delta epicenter and the number of cases and hospitalizations continues to rise.

The number of new cases rose from an average of 822 a day two weeks ago to 1,631 on Sunday, a 98 percent increase, according to the analysis.

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (MDHSS) reported Sunday that the state records 142.1 cases per 100,000 residents, the highest in the country.

In addition, the seven-day positivity rate is at 12.3 percent, not as high as the record 23.1 percent in November, but eight percentage points higher since the beginning of June,

MDHSS also reports that only 17 percent of ICU beds in the state remain available.

Some of the highest numbers of new cases per capita in the past two weeks also came in states bordering Missouri, such as Kansas.

The state reported the largest increase in COVID-19 cases in more than three months as the Delta variant becomes a major public health problem.

Data from the Kansas Department of Health showed the state had an average of 275 new COVID-19 cases per day for the seven days ending Friday, the highest seven-day average since March 26.

In Missouri, the current US epicenter, the seven-day average of cases has risen from 822 a day two weeks ago to 1,631, a 98% increase

In Missouri, the current US epicenter, the seven-day average of cases has risen from 822 a day two weeks ago to 1,631, a 98% increase

Kansas reported an average of 275 new COVID-19 cases per day for the seven days ending Friday, the highest number since March 26

Kansas reported an average of 275 new COVID-19 cases per day for the seven days ending Friday, the highest number since March 26

In Arkansas, the number of new coronavirus cases has risen 47% in the past two weeks from an average of 402 cases per day to 591 per day

In Arkansas, the number of new coronavirus cases has risen 47% in the past two weeks from an average of 402 cases per day to 591 per day

The number of new cases per day is still well below its mid-to-late November peak, but it comes after local officials ended mask-wearing and leaders of the Kansas legislature ended the state of emergency for the pandemic.

Data from the state health department showed that Cherokee County had the highest number of new cases per 1,000 residents in the past two weeks of all 105 Kansas counties, 6.67, more than six times the rate of 1.08 new cases per 1,000. 1,000 residents of the state.

Cherokee County has nearly 20,000 residents and the state reported 133 new confirmed or probable cases in the past two weeks.

The top 20 counties for new cases per 1,000 residents include seven of the 10 counties bordering Missouri, according to an AP analysis.

Another four are in southeastern Kansas — relatively close to the delta variant hot spot in southwestern Missouri.

Meanwhile, only 42.6 percent of the state’s population is fully vaccinated, which falls short of the national average, according to CDC data.

“We have provided assistance to local health departments and are sending additional testing and vaccination resources to the most affected areas,” said Dr. Lee Norman, the top administrator of the state’s health department.

“We continue to advise increasing vaccination and wearing masks.”

In nearby Arkansas, health officials reported more than 1,000 cases of COVID-19 for the third day in a row, more than the 1,000 new infections reported Wednesday but less than the 1,200 reported Thursday.

Data from Johns Hopkins shows that the number of new cases has increased by 47 percent from an average of 402 per day to 591 per day.

The virus has been on the rise in Arkansas in recent weeks, fueled by the Delta variant and the state’s lagging vaccination coverage.

According to CDC data, only 34.9 percent of residents are fully vaccinated, with the state having the third-worst vaccination rate in the country, behind Alabama and Mississippi, respectively.

Last week, Gov Asa Hutchinson kicked off a series of town hall-style rallies to encourage more COVID-19 vaccinations.

“We’re working very hard to reach that population through the employer, through trusted advisors, like the clinics, to make sure they have the information and overcome the [vaccine] hesitation or just the “we’re deferring” approach,” Hutchinson told ABC’s This week on Sunday.

“We just have to answer, as in all history, that the truth overcomes skepticism and mistrust. You overcome resistance and stubbornness by saying it’s important to our community, and it’s important to the health of our state and nation.”

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