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Mahmoud Taluli, who suffers from & # 39; tree man syndrome & # 39 ;, can & # 39; finally live a normal life & # 39; after surgery to remove the barky growths on his hands. He is pictured after surgery at the Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, with his surgeon Dr. Michael Chernofsky

A father with & # 39; tree man syndrome & # 39; can & # 39; finally live a normal life & # 39; after surgery to remove the barky growths from his hands.

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Mahmoud Taluli, 44, suffers from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). This is caused by the immune system that is unable to combat wart-causing viruses such as HPV.

After not being able to use his hands for more than a decade, Mr. Taluli, from Gaza, had removed thousands of painful lesions from his entire body more than two years ago.

However, the growth jumps, described as tree-bark-like, grew back, requiring him to undergo four operations since 2017.

To get to the bottom of the problem once and for all, Mr. Taluli must follow a fifth procedure to get the & # 39; roots & # 39; of the lesions in the next few months.

This should prevent the tumors from spreading and reduce the pain of those who press on his nerves.

Despite all that he has endured, Mr. Taluli claims that his operations have changed his life & # 39; and mean that he can finally play with his children.

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Mahmoud Taluli, who suffers from & # 39; tree man syndrome & # 39 ;, can & # 39; finally live a normal life & # 39; after surgery to remove the barky growths on his hands. He is pictured after surgery at the Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, with his surgeon Dr. Michael Chernofsky

Mahmoud Taluli, who suffers from & # 39; tree man syndrome & # 39 ;, can & # 39; finally live a normal life & # 39; after surgery to remove the barky growths on his hands. He is pictured after surgery at the Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, with his surgeon Dr. Michael Chernofsky

Thousands of painful lesions covered Mr. Taluli's body, especially his left hand (pictured). This made him in chronic pain, unable to use his hand and ashamed every time he left the house. The & # 39; bast & # 39; is actually warts caused by Mr. Taluli's inability to fight viruses such as HPV

Thousands of painful lesions covered Mr. Taluli's body, especially his left hand (pictured). This made him in chronic pain, unable to use his hand and ashamed every time he left the house. The & # 39; bast & # 39; is actually warts caused by Mr. Taluli's inability to fight viruses such as HPV

Thousands of painful lesions covered Mr. Taluli's body, especially his left hand (pictured). This made him in chronic pain, unable to use his hand and ashamed every time he left the house. The & # 39; bast & # 39; is actually warts caused by Mr. Taluli's inability to fight viruses such as HPV

Speaking of his procedures, Mr. Taluli said: & # 39; After years of suffering and loneliness, I can finally lead a normal life.

& # 39; The operation has completely changed my life. I can play with my children, & # 39; NPR reported.

Mr Taluli's situation first appeared around a decade ago. For years he suffered from chronic pain and felt ashamed every time he left the house.

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Although he had limited movement in his right hand, he could not move the left at all.

WHAT IS EPIDERMODYSPLASIA VERRUCIFORMIS?

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, inherited skin condition that causes wart-like eruptions.

These can be red-brown to violet and can have flaky surfaces or irregular edges.

They are most common in places exposed to the sun, such as the hands, feet, face and earlobes.

EV is thought to be caused by patients with a reduced immune system, making them more vulnerable to HPV and wart-causing viruses.

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About 10 percent of patients come from marriages with blood relatives.

In up to 60 percent of cases, EV lesions turn into skin cancer when exposed to UV light.

There is no medicine. Lesions can be deleted as soon as they appear.

The prevalence of EV is unknown, but reports show that only four cases have been diagnosed worldwide.

Source: DermNet New Zealand

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Before doctors in Egypt and Jordan arrived at the Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem in 2017, he was advised to have his hands amputated.

Dr. Michael Chernofsky, an orthopedic surgeon at Hadassah, emphasizes that amputation is a & # 39; nonstarter & # 39; is in EV.

The physician, who oversees Mr. Taluli's treatment, said cutting hands would break nerves, leading to worse pain.

And although EV is typically worse on the hands, it would continue to affect the rest of Mr. Taluli's body.

& # 39; We were his last hope & # 39 ;, Dr. Chernofsky said Newsweek. & # 39; He had lived with severe chronic pain.

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& # 39; He was ashamed to be seen in public & # 39 ;.

Deciding on surgery was the best option, doctors used scalpels to cut the lesions on Mr Taluli's body during his first surgery in 2017.

Although initially he could use his hands again, the tumors soon reappeared.

Dr. Chernofsky believes that Mr. Taluli has reinvented himself & # 39; by touching his lesions and then other parts of his body.

The medical team has therefore decided to & # 39; every last piece & # 39; of the growths, instead of just shaving & # 39; the surface & # 39 ;.

They are also working on charting Mr Taluli's DNA to discover the genetic mutation that does not allow him to fight HPV, which has more than 100 species.

Many of these strains are harmless and cause no symptoms, but some have been associated with cervical, penis, and anus cancers.

The doctors hope to one day treat Mr. Taluli with a personalized therapy focused on his mutation.

However, EV is rare and has no fixed treatment guidelines, the medical stress.

Living in Gaza, Mr. Taluli also has limited access to physical therapy to help him & # 39; re-learn & # 39; how to use his hands.

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Patients from the enclave are reported to have received permission from Palestinian and Israeli officials to enter Israel for care. The treatment of Mr Taluli has been approved so far.

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