Father reveals how drug dealers in a skate park turned his son into a 20-year-old ice addict

Jaxon Kinnane (pictured as a child), 20, faces a jail sentence after admitting she knocked out her mother. His father has revealed how an addiction to ice turned him into a boy

A father whose son addicted to methamphetamine is behind bars after knocking out his mother with a fury fueled by drugs has revealed the devastating impact the ice has had on his family.

Murray Kinnane, 57, has spent the last five years trying to help his 20-year-old son, Jaxon, overcome drug addiction, but nothing has worked.

Perth's father of three says his two daughters and his wife have become prisoners in their own home, forced to lock their bedroom doors for fear of Jaxon.

While Jaxon is awaiting a possible jail sentence after pleading guilty to the assault, Mr. Kinnane has asked the government to work on better drug rehabilitation laws.

Jaxon Kinnane (pictured as a child), 20, faces a jail sentence after admitting she knocked out her mother. His father has revealed how an addiction to ice turned him from a "daring and popular" boy into a monster

As a result of having taken too many "Benzos", Jaxon (pictured) was placed on life support twice last year after an overdose of the drug.

As a result of having taken too many "Benzos", Jaxon (pictured) was placed on life support twice last year after an overdose of the drug.

As a result of having taken too many "Benzos", Jaxon (pictured) was placed on life support twice last year after an overdose of the drug.

Perth's father of three says his two daughters and his wife (photographed together in better times) have become prisoners in their own home.

Perth's father of three says his two daughters and his wife (photographed together in better times) have become prisoners in their own home.

Perth's father of three says his two daughters and his wife (photographed together in better times) have become prisoners in their own home.

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, Kinnane said her son started taking drugs when he was 14, but there were no obvious signs to suggest he was "using" him.

Looking back, however, he believes that his only son resorted to drugs after falling with the wrong people in a skate park as an impressionable teenager.

& # 39; He started to go to the skate park, and trying not to be a helicopter father, I said yes. Well, at least he's being social, "Mr. Kinnane said.

The father of three years learned that at that time there were people & # 39; great & # 39; that they made friends with children and convinced them to take drugs with the intention of selling them.

"Start with someone who offers kids cigarettes … and then what happens is that they eventually offer them marijuana," he explained.

He claimed that some of those traffickers allegedly joined the marijuana joints with ice so that the children would become addicted to the substance from an early age.

Mr. Kinnane said he believed that many of the children sold ice to feed their addictions after trying the powerful drug.

Mr. Kinnane believes that his only son, Jaxon, (pictured) turned to drugs after he fell with the wrong crowd at a local skate park.

Mr. Kinnane believes that his only son, Jaxon, (pictured) turned to drugs after he fell with the wrong crowd at a local skate park.

Mr. Kinnane believes that his only son, Jaxon, (pictured) turned to drugs after he fell with the wrong crowd at a local skate park.

Mr. Kinnane, 57 years old (left), has spent the last five years trying to help his 20-year-old son, Jaxon, (right) to beat drug addiction, but nothing has worked, and Now he has reached the limit.

Mr. Kinnane, 57 years old (left), has spent the last five years trying to help his 20-year-old son, Jaxon, (right) to beat drug addiction, but nothing has worked, and Now he has reached the limit.

Mr. Kinnane, 57 years old (left), has spent the last five years trying to help his 20-year-old son, Jaxon, (right) to beat drug addiction, but nothing has worked, and Now he has reached the limit.

As Jaxon continued to use drugs during his adolescence, the Kinnane family saw his boy "popular and cheeky". become someone they did not recognize

It was not until a seemingly innocuous conversation at the family home became ugly last month that Mr. Kinnane realized that his son needed "urgent" help.

"We tried to take him (to Jaxon) to a rehabilitation center, and then we asked him to stay there and have it sorted out," Kinnane told Daily Mail Australia.

But when the issue of rehabilitation and future treatments was discussed, Kinnane said that Jaxon became aggressive physically and verbally.he just went & # 39;.

Mr. Kinnane believes that his son was going through retreats, made worse by the fact that his cell phone had been confiscated to avoid drug-seeking behavior.

"He told me that I could go and be fucked, that I was the worst father in the world," Mr. Kinnane said.

The situation really turned violent, however, after Jaxon's mother gave her the news that she could not go into rehabilitation as soon as she expected.

Enraged by the news, Jaxon lashed out at his parents and started hitting things around the house, breaking a front light door before leaving.

Seeing himself flushed, Mr. Kinnane told Jaxon to leave the family home and not return, at which time the 20-year-old began punching.

Fearful for her husband's safety, Jaxon's mother tried to pepper the 20-year-old with pepper spray to stop him, but he lashed out, grabbing an "almighty swing" and knocking her out.

The police officers arrived a short time later and arrested Jaxon.

Mr. Kinnane said he discovered that "great" people were making friends with children like Jaxon (in the picture) and convinced them to take drugs with the intention of selling them.

Mr. Kinnane said he discovered that "great" people were making friends with children like Jaxon (in the picture) and convinced them to take drugs with the intention of selling them.

Mr. Kinnane said he discovered that "great" people were making friends with children like Jaxon (in the picture) and convinced them to take drugs with the intention of selling them.

Mr. Kinnane and his wife have not had any contact with their son since the assault.

"The police probably have been in my house 10 or 15 times just for their assault (from Jaxon)," said the father of three.

"We have expelled him three times and they gave him a VRO (Violence Restraining Order) for 72 hours … but since he has nowhere to go, he returns."

Jaxon faces a jail sentence for the assault, and although he is not happy that his son is in custody, Mr. Kinnane believes it is the right place for him at the moment.

He said he is not prepared to have his son home until he has been properly rehabilitated, adding, "My son needs detoxification."

He went on to say that his son needs a compulsory rehabilitation, but at the moment there is no legislation that imposes the treatment of people with severe drug addiction.

Mr. Kinnane said, while growing up, Jaxon (pictured) was always a kind of carefree child

Mr. Kinnane said, while growing up, Jaxon (pictured) was always a kind of carefree child

Mr. Kinnane said, while growing up, Jaxon (pictured) was always a kind of carefree child

Jaxon has presented numerous times in his local hospital in search of help, only to be released in a matter of hours.

Another problem is that methamphetamine addicts often prescribe benzodiazepines, a type of tranquilizer, to calm their mood, but often they also end up being addicted to them.

As a result of taking too many "Benzos", Jaxon received life support twice last year after an overdose of the drug.

Mr. Kinnane said he is hopeful that his son will improve, but he fears that his son has no hope of escaping the brutal cycle of drug addiction with the current system.

"I feel really disappointed by the system, which continued to free my son," he said.

"I understand that people have their rights … but this is a health situation for people who do not have the cognitive capacity to make decisions for themselves."

Jaxon (pictured) showed up several times at her local hospital for help, only to be released in a matter of hours

.