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Apple Watch occasionally measures a person's heart rate to check for an irregular rhythm. Pictured, the Apple Watch 5, costs £ 349

Dad praises his Apple Watch after the gadget noticed the irregular heartbeat of the 30-year-old – although doctors said it & # 39; unlikely & # 39; was that he had the potentially fatal condition

  • Chris Mint, 30, was notified after two years of using his Apple Watch
  • He went to his doctor and an ECG found the atrial fibrillation disorder
  • Specialists found two leaking heart valves that needed surgery
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A father of two praised his Apple Watch after he noticed his irregular heartbeat – a potentially fatal condition.

Chris Mint, 30, was surprised when his £ 349 gadget that he had randomly warned for two years that his heartbeat was irregular.

Mr. Mint, from Lincolnshire, was asked to visit his doctor, who told him it was & # 39; unlikely & # 39; was that he had the atrial fibrillation.

But later he tested a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (Afib), which sometimes goes unnoticed if it causes no symptoms.

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Mr. Mint said he had to undergo surgery after specialists later discovered that two of his heart valves were leaking, which could dangerously disrupt blood flow.

Apple Watch occasionally measures a person's heart rate to check for an irregular rhythm. Pictured, the Apple Watch 5, costs £ 349

Apple Watch occasionally measures a person's heart rate to check for an irregular rhythm. Pictured, the Apple Watch 5, costs £ 349

Mr. Mint, a project manager, said The sun: & # 39; I had owned the watch for about two years before it informed me that I had symptoms of Afib. I had no idea it was able to do that until it just turned up in July.

& # 39; Buying the watch was the best money I have ever spent. I am grateful. Really grateful. & # 39;

WHAT IS ATRIAL FIBRILATION?

Atrial fibrillation is a heart condition that causes an irregular and often abnormally fast heartbeat.

A normal heartbeat should be regular and between 60 and 100 beats per minute when you are resting.

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With atrial fibrillation, the heartbeat is irregular and can sometimes be very fast. In some cases this can be considerably higher than 100 beats per minute.

This can cause problems such as dizziness, shortness of breath and fatigue.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and affects approximately one million people in the UK.

It can affect adults of any age, but it is more common in older people. It affects around seven in every 100 people over the age of 65.

You may be aware of noticeable palpitations, where your heart feels like it is pounding, fluttering, or beating irregularly, often for a few seconds or, in some cases, a few minutes.

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According to Mr. Mint, doctors said the watch had saved him from the possibility of a stroke or a heart attack.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and affects approximately one million people in the UK.

It increases the risk of stroke by about four to five times, caused by a blood clot in the heart that travels to the brain.

Mr. Mint's wife, Tiffany, wrote to Apple CEO Tim Cook to tell him how the device had led to a shocking diagnosis.

He reportedly replied with: & # 39; I am glad that your husband has sought treatment and is now fine. Thank you for sharing his story – it inspires us to continue. & # 39;

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Apple announced in September 2018 that the latest software – available to anyone with an Apple Watch Series 1 or higher – would include a built-in capability to take an ECG (or ECG) to monitor the heart rhythm.

In a hospital or clinical environment, an ECG is a crucial diagnostic tool for heart disease and arrhythmias.

The test monitors the electrical activity of the heart via electrode sensors placed on the chest.

The feature in Apple Watch has proven to be equally effective 98 percent of the time in marking heart rate abnormalities.

Apple Watch occasionally measures a person's heart rate to check for an irregular rhythm.

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Atrial fibrillation often goes unnoticed because patients' hearts go in and out of the abnormal rhythm, not picked up by an ECG.

HAVE APPLE WATCHES SAVED?

The Michigan Woman's life-saving 911 call is not the only time Apple Watches has helped users in difficult circumstances.

In 2017, Bennett from Laytonsville, Maryland, drove home from school on the night of April 6 when he was hit by another vehicle – causing him and his Jeep Patriot to fly through the air.

Bennett (22) hung on the driver's seat with only his seat belt, but his iPhone was too far out of reach for help.

However, he recalled that the Apple Watch had the SOS Emergency feature – he held the side button down and contacted 911 for help, who were on site within six minutes.

Several users have also become accustomed to heart rate monitoring capabilities of the Watch to alert them of problems.

Apple Watch automatically calls the local emergency number when a user calls with the SOS function by holding down the side button. Emergency services said the watch saved the man's life

Apple Watch automatically calls the local emergency number when a user calls with the SOS function by holding down the side button. Emergency services said the watch saved the man's life

Apple Watch automatically calls the local emergency number when a user calls with the SOS function by holding down the side button. Emergency services said the watch saved the man's life

A 28-year-old reporter claims that the only reason he lives alone today is because of a report on his Apple Watch.

James Green mentions the gadget, which costs between $ 329 and $ 1,399 for the latest model, with a life-threatening blood clot in his lungs.

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His timepiece warned him of a sudden rise in his heartbeat – a sign of a pulmonary embolism – that he had previously suffered from.

It led him to seek urgent medical help, and doctors later diagnosed him with the clot – which can kill in minutes because it prevents blood from reaching the lungs.

Mr Green, from New York, tweeted: & never thought that a stupid lil (sic) wrist computer that I bought two years ago would save my life.

& # 39; I saw my heart rate go up and eventually become a pulmonary embolism. & # 39; His heating station has since been retweeted 11,000 times.

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