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Dennis Pearce died after doctors had not acknowledged that a carnivorous disease had caused his sepsis
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Dennis Pearce died after doctors had not acknowledged that a carnivorous disease had caused his sepsis

Dennis Pearce died after doctors had not acknowledged that a carnivorous disease had caused his sepsis

A father died after young doctors reportedly did not recognize the carnivorous disease that caused his sepsis.

Dennis Pearce was admitted to the Heartlands Hospital in Birmingham on October 4 last year after complaining about pain in his right arm, nausea and an abscess in his armpit.

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Although he went to the hospital around 1.30 pm, he did not have an x-ray that gave him the diagnosis of sepsis until 10.25 pm.

This led him to be diagnosed with the carnivorous disease necrotizing fasciitis (NF) that his right armpit had taken.

Things took a dramatic turn when the father of two suffered a cardiac arrest on October 5, making him unsuitable for surgery to remove the affected tissue.

Mr. Pearce's family decided to disable his living on October 5, 36 hours after his arrival at the hospital. The pensioner died at the age of 73.

A serious University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust incident report later identified a series of shortcomings that led to Mr. Pearce's death.

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Speaking of her father, 47-year-old Karen, Pearce's daughter, said: & Dennis was a wonderful husband and father. He was the foundation of our family.

& # 39; The decision to withdraw dad's treatment will be the most difficult decision anyone will ever have to make.

# It may have been almost a year since he died, but the pain and pain that we continue to feel is still as raw as it was then.

& # 39; What makes it harder to come to terms is that we have never been able to say goodbye to Dad because he was so poor. & # 39;

Karen took her father to A&E last year when he complained about a large number of symptoms, including an inflamed right elbow and limited movement in his arm.

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Pearce & # 39; s wife Jacqueline, with whom he had been married for 50 years, claims that she has called the hospital several times to check her husband. Karen left her father alone in the hospital when she had to return to work.

Mrs. Pearce claims that she had the impression that her husband had routine tests.

A GP in A&E is said to have assessed Mr Pearce, who referred him to a GP.

The pensioner was reviewed at 5 p.m. and told that he had no abscess. Nevertheless, his care was escalated to the trauma and orthopedic team.

After further assessments and X-rays, a registrar asked Mr Pearce at 10.25 am with sepsis, citing an infection under his right armpit as a possible cause.

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Because Mr Pearce was rapidly deteriorating, plans were made to have a CT scan made at 5 am the next day to find out the exact source of the infection.

However, this never happened after he had a cardiac arrest that morning at around 6.30 am before the scan.

During all of this, Karen, Jacqueline, and Mr. Pearce's son, 52, were told to go to the hospital because Mr. Pearce was nearly dead. He died at 12.40 pm on October 5.

Mr Pearce's loved ones made the decision to withdraw his life support based on doctor's advice.

Mr Pearce's wife, 50, Jacqueline (pictured on their wedding day) claims that she called the hospital to check his progress and got the impression that he had routine tests

Mr Pearce's wife, 50, Jacqueline (pictured on their wedding day) claims that she called the hospital to check his progress and got the impression that he had routine tests

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Mr Pearce's wife, 50, Jacqueline (pictured on their wedding day) claims that she called the hospital to check his progress and got the impression that he had routine tests

A serious incident report later stated that a & # 39; lack of recognition & # 39; by doctors about Mr. Pearce's sepsis meant that a & # 39; opportunity was missed & # 39; to diagnose him with NF.

It also concluded that a senior employee should have assessed Mr Pearce at an early stage to determine which team should look after him.

Allegedly, junior and middle class physicians reported a & # 39; lack of recognition & # 39; of sepsis or what it had caused.

The report also discovered that there was a & # 39; lack of communication & # 39; was among medical teams about who had to take care of Mr. Pearce.

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Finally, the report stated that his infected tissue should have been removed earlier.

& # 39; It was a complete shock and absolutely devastating to receive the report by mail, highlighting numerous failures with Dad & # 39; s concern that could have caused his death, & # 39; said Karen.

Amid their grief, the family speaks for World Sepsis Day on Friday.

& # 39; The only thing we can hope for now is that when we give lessons, lessons are learned and more people are aware of how dangerous sepsis can be, & # 39; said Karen.

& # 39; It is so important that symptoms are noticed quickly so that those who suffer can get the best available care as soon as possible. & # 39;

Pearce was admitted to the Heartlands Hospital in Birmingham on October 4 last year (photo) after complaining about pain in his right arm, nausea and an abscess under his armpit
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Pearce was admitted to the Heartlands Hospital in Birmingham on October 4 last year (photo) after complaining about pain in his right arm, nausea and an abscess under his armpit

Pearce was admitted to the Heartlands Hospital in Birmingham on October 4 last year (photo) after complaining about pain in his right arm, nausea and an abscess under his armpit

Jennifer Shipley, specialist in medical negligence at Irwin Mitchel, who represents the family, said: “Through our work, we have seen on several occasions the terrible impact that sepsis can have on people if it is not treated as quickly as possible.

& # 39; It is understandable that Jacqueline and the rest of the family are devastated and extremely concerned about the worrying problems in the care that Dennis received that the Trust had identified.

& # 39; We are now working with the Trust to address the concerns of the family. & # 39;

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At the back of the report, the Trust made a number of recommendations. These include ensuring that a patient is assessed by a registrar if it is transferred to a specific medical team at A&E.

& # 39; We are delighted that the Trust has made a number of recommendations after its investigation, because the family now wants lessons to be learned, & # 39; Mrs. Shipley said.

& # 39; It is now vital that these recommendations are implemented and enforced by staff at all times to improve patient care. & # 39;

Dr. Ron Daniels, general manager of the UK Sepsis Trust, added: “Every year in the UK 250,000 people are affected by sepsis, 52,000 of whom lose their lives to the condition.

& # 39; However, if the diagnosis is made quickly, sepsis is easy to treat and we believe that previous diagnosis and treatment in the UK would save at least 14,000 lives a year.

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& # 39; With each hour that passes before the correct antibiotics are administered, the risk of death increases.

& # 39; Better awareness can save thousands of lives and together we can change the way sepsis is handled in the UK. & # 39;

MailOnline has approached University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust for comment.

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis occurs when the body responds to an infection by attacking its own organs and tissues.

In the UK, around 44,000 people die of sepsis every year. Someone from the disease dies every 3.5 seconds worldwide.

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Sepsis has symptoms similar to flu, gastroenteritis and a breast infection.

Among which:

  • Svague speech or confusion
  • Extreme chills or muscle pain
  • Pdo not assess urine on a day
  • Salways short of breath
  • Iit feels like you're dying
  • Schin stained or discolored

Symptoms in children are:

  • Fast breathing
  • Fits or convulses
  • Spotted, bluish or pale skin
  • Skin rash that does not fade when pressed
  • idleness
  • Feeling abnormally cold

Among the five, repeated vomiting, no eating, or no peeing can occur for 12 hours.

Anyone can develop sepsis, but it is most common in people who have recently had surgery, have a urinary catheter, or have been in the hospital for a long time.

Other risk people are people with a weak immune system, chemotherapy patients, pregnant women, the elderly and very young people.

The treatment varies depending on the site of the infection, but includes antibiotics, IV fluids and oxygen if necessary.

Source: UK Sepsis Trust and NHS choices

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