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Fascinating image shows that anti-aging drugs really work

A fascinating picture of two very different mice shows that anti-aging drugs really work.

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Scientists gave the youth-promoting medication to mice, with some rodents having shiny fur and bright eyes.

This is a sharp contrast to the delicate, tired-looking mice that did not receive the medication – and can easily be confused because they are twice as old as the treated animals.

Researchers discovered that giving anti-aging – or senolytic – drugs to rodents extended their lives by 36 percent – the equivalent of about 30 human years.

Six trials in which senolytic drugs are being tested in humans are already underway and another half dozen will start in the near future.

Scientists gave the youth-promoting medication to mice, with some rodents shining bright and with clear eyes (right). This is a sharp contrast to the delicate, tired-looking mice (left) who have not received the medication – and can easily be confused because they are twice as old as the treated animals

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If successful, medication that slows down aging may be available within two years, the researchers claim.

The study was conducted by the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and led by Dr. James Kirkland, a clinical geriatrician and director of the Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging.

"Most people don't want to be 130 and feel like they're 130, but they wouldn't mind turning 90 or 100 and feeling like they're 60," Dr. said. Kirland The Telegraph.

& # 39; And now that can actually be achieved in animals. & # 39;

Aging is believed to play a role in the development of everything from cancer and arthritis to Alzheimer's and heart disease.

Dr. Kirkland notes that it is very rare for a person to suffer from just one chronic age-related illness, with most people fighting multiple disorders at the same time.

This suggests that there is a common mechanism behind & # 39; elderly & # 39; disorders.

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"You tend to find older people who are completely healthy and play 18 golf rounds a day, or they have three, five or ten different conditions," said Dr. Kirkland.

Pictured left, the untreated mouse, compared to the mouse that did receive the medication, right

Pictured left, the untreated mouse, compared to the mouse that did receive the medication, right

Pictured left, the untreated mouse, compared to the mouse that did receive the medication, right

WHAT ARE SENESCENT – OR & # 39; ZOMBIE & # 39; – CELLS?

Senescent – or & # 39; zombie & # 39; – cells are formed from normal cells but have lost the ability to divide.

These cells are & # 39; alive & # 39; but do not work and are not cleared away by the body as normal.

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Otherwise, healthy cells are thought to age due to the accumulation of senescent cells, which can cause inflammation or release harmful chemicals.

Although senescent cells accumulate with age, they are thought to become dangerous only when they reach a critical threshold.

They are probably caused by DNA damage or inflammation, as well as the inability to switch genes on and off at the right time & # 39; to put.

Perhaps most importantly, senescent cells have clustered around the lesions of heart attack patients, the bones of patients with osteoporosis, and the joints of people with arthritis.

And transplantation of organs from older patients to younger people has been shown to increase the risk of age-related diseases.

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It is believed that the transfer of senescent cells is to blame.

Instead of trying just one disease, scientists are now trying to create a broad-spectrum drug that can & # 39; disable & # 39; that causes a large number of disorders.

Dr. Kirkland compares this with an antibiotic that can relieve up to 25 infections.

He states that it is always better to treat the mechanism behind a disorder than just to mask its symptoms.

Dr. Kirkland added that he & # 39; tired & # 39; is about prescribing wheelchairs and incontinence products to the elderly, and believes that & # 39; disease-modifying & # 39; interventions are crucial.

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Senolytic drugs target senescent or & # 39; zombie & # 39; cells that have lost the ability to share.

These cells are & # 39; alive & # 39; but do not work and are not cleared away by the body as normal.

Otherwise, healthy cells are thought to age due to the accumulation of senescent cells, which can cause inflammation or release harmful chemicals.

Although senescent cells accumulate with age, they are thought to become dangerous only when they reach a critical threshold.

They are probably caused by DNA damage or inflammation, as well as the inability to switch genes on and off at the right time & # 39; to put.

Perhaps most importantly, senescent cells have clustered around the lesions of heart attack patients, the bones of patients with osteoporosis, and the joints of people with arthritis.

And transplantation of organs from older patients to younger people has been shown to increase the risk of age-related diseases.

It is believed that the transfer of senescent cells is to blame.

Aging is believed to play a role in the development of everything from cancer and arthritis to Alzheimer's and heart disease. Six trials involving the testing of senolytic drugs in humans are ongoing, with researchers & # 39; optimistic & # 39; to be; the medication may already be available within two years (stock)

Aging is believed to play a role in the development of everything from cancer and arthritis to Alzheimer's and heart disease. Six trials involving the testing of senolytic drugs in humans are ongoing, with researchers & # 39; optimistic & # 39; to be; the medication may already be available within two years (stock)

Aging is believed to play a role in the development of everything from cancer and arthritis to Alzheimer's and heart disease. Six trials involving the testing of senolytic drugs in humans are ongoing, with researchers & # 39; optimistic & # 39; to be; the medication may already be available within two years (stock)

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The mice in the Mayo study received a senolytic drug cocktail from dasatinib, which is usually used to treat leukemia, and the quercetin plant supplement, which is found in green tea, red wine and apples.

When other scientists have transplanted senescent cells into young animals, the animals have shown signs of aging and developed related diseases.

But the administration of senolytic drugs erased these senescent cells through their & # 39; suicide & # 39; to activate and disconnect their energy supply.

And the cells are then replaced with healthy tissue.

A study also found that exposing tissue from obese diabetic patients to senolytic drugs caused their fat cells to react to insulin again.

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But before senolytic drugs can be prescribed, they must first be tested in human trials.

Six tests are already underway and another half a dozen will start in the near future.

One was performed in 14 elderly patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, making the lungs scarring and making breathing difficult.

The results showed that only nine doses of the drug over three months improved the walking speed of the patients and how far they could move, as well as reducing their vulnerability.

Dr. Kirkland called the results & # 39; very significant and dramatic & # 39 ;, with most idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients never experiencing any improvement.

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The findings motivated his team to conduct a larger study of patients who & # 39; would not have as much to lose if something went wrong & # 39 ;.

All mice involved in the more recent Mayo study remained reassuring in good health.

If studies remain successful, the scientists can begin to look at how senolytic drugs can help people with more minor disorders, such as mild cognitive impairment, vulnerability and incontinence.

Dr. Tamara Tchkonia – working with Dr. Kirkland – claims that senolytic drugs might be available in the next two years, but admits that they are an & # 39; optimistic person & # 39; is.

The Mayo Clinic, together with seven other research institutions in the US, has formed the Translational Geroscience Network, which will conduct the studies.

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