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HomeUSFarrah Storr: Four years ago, big was beautiful. Then everything changed

Farrah Storr: Four years ago, big was beautiful. Then everything changed

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Five years ago, I put a relatively unknown model on the cover of a magazine I was editing. The magazine was international. The model was Tess Holliday, a young woman from Mississippi who weighed in at 300 pounds.

We chose to put her on the cover for no other reason than that I met her at a conference a few months ago. She made a room full of jaw-dropping young women with her cut in the fashion world, despite not making any contacts, being 5ft 4in and size 24.

Here, I thought, was an interesting model of our time “snowflake”. And so we photographed her, let her wear a bunch of outfits that we called, stumbled upon a gorgeous picture of her in her jade green bodysuit and that was it. We sent it to the printers.

Since the monthly magazines run about three months ahead of schedule, we didn’t think about it until, 12 weeks later, while out in a meeting, I got an email from my feature manager. “We just hooked up with Tess Holliday’s cover,” the message read. “It all started.”

You weren’t kidding. In the back of a cab on my way back to the office, I opened Cosmo’s Instagram page – generally a place for nice commentary. But not on that day. or the next day. or even several weeks after that.

Five years ago, I put a relatively unknown model on the cover of a magazine I was editing. The magazine was international. The model was Tess Holliday, a young Mississippi woman who weighed 300 pounds (pictured)

This is what the world needs to see! I did well’. “Nasty – unsubscribe now!” It went on and on: a swing of high vibes. Raging sides with no middle ground.

It turns out that this was just the beginning. Over the following weeks, the magazine found itself caught between the exhilaration of the body-positive movement and the anger of others.

I was taken before the nation to explain myself on Good Morning Britain, while word got to me that a senior executive in the company I worked for had appalled me at what I had done. Four days later, a sinister handwriting arrived at the office telling me I needed to “watch my back,” because I had chosen to put a “whale” on the cover of a magazine.

I was confused. The truth is, this cover was in no way an attempt to impose a belief system on anyone. It was just an opportunity to open up a discussion about something the world seemed nervous to talk about: women’s bodies. But here’s the thing: Nobody wants a discussion. What they wanted was to win unilaterally. losers on the other hand.

This season, plus-size models were notably absent from most of the catwalks.  Just a few years ago, major brands like Fendi made plus-size models a constant feature of their runway shows.  Now, however, they all look visibly smaller

This season, plus-size models were notably absent from most of the catwalks. Just a few years ago, major brands like Fendi made plus-size models a constant feature of their runway shows. Now, however, they all look visibly smaller

For a while it seemed like the body positivity movement was making headway. The 2019 catwalk shows began to be filled with models who had wobbly bottoms and boobs — Ashley Graham, Paloma Elsesser, Alpha Claire. That same year, mega-fashion brands like Reformation, Anthropologie, and Veronica Beard introduced true plus-size ranges for women over a size 14.

Celebrities talked about finally loving and accepting their bodies

Old Navy US department store did a whole song and dance to it with its multi-million dollar campaign, Bodequality, to launch its plus-size collection. Celebrities came out to support them, talking about their love and acceptance of their bodies, just the way they were.

Finally, there were the poster girls — Mindy Kaling, Amy Schumer, Chrissy Teigen — of a movement that didn’t have a name ten years ago. It looked like there was a victory. Then things calmed down.

This is in stark contrast to the past few seasons.  In spring 2021, for example, plus-size model Precious Lee (pictured) was the face of Versace.  This season is actress Emily Ratajkowski

This is in stark contrast to the past few seasons. In spring 2021, for example, plus-size model Precious Lee (pictured) was the face of Versace. This season is actress Emily Ratajkowski

This season, actress Emily Ratajkowski (pictured) will appear as the face of Versace, while in 2021 model Precious Lee will appear.

This season, actress Emily Ratajkowski (pictured) will appear as the face of Versace, while in 2021 model Precious Lee will appear.

This season, plus-size models were notably absent from most of the catwalks. Just a few years ago, major brands like Fendi made plus-size models a constant feature of their runway shows. Now, however, they all look visibly smaller. Of the 49 major spring/summer campaigns this season, only one (St. John) featured a medium-size (10 to 14) model.

This is in stark contrast to the past few seasons. In spring 2021, for example, plus-size model Precious Lee was the face of Versace. This season is actress Emily Ratajkowski.

But it’s not just fashion that has forgotten the body positive movement. It seems like half of Hollywood is shrinking, thanks to a self-diabetic injection called Ozempic, which leads to rapid weight loss. Moreover, the latest fad in plastic surgery – cheek fat removal (which basically involves getting rid of fat from the cheeks) is on the rise.

A recent photo of actress Lea Michele suggests she may have had the procedure, while others suspect that model Bella Hadid and actress Zoe Kravitz have also had buccal fat removal. You should hand it to Chrissy Teigen: At least she admitted she had it.

Then there’s the literal vanishing act of the most iconic body positive movement model. Amy Schumer recently admitted to having liposuction. Mindy Kaling has lost 40 pounds, while Rebel Wilson, Melissa McCarthy, and Adele all seem to vanish with each passing day.

As for Old Navy’s full-blown Bodequality campaign? The brand has quietly reduced its in-store mass size during the pandemic.

The 2019 catwalk shows began to be filled with models who had wobbly bottoms and boobs — Ashley Graham (pictured), Paloma Elsesser, Alpha Claire

The 2019 catwalk shows began to be filled with models who had wobbly bottoms and boobs — Ashley Graham (pictured), Paloma Elsesser, Alpha Claire

Of the 49 major spring/summer campaigns this season, only one (St. John) featured a midsize model (10 to 14).

Of the 49 major spring/summer campaigns this season, only one (St. John) featured a midsize model (10 to 14).

This is not the way it should have gone. Because that’s what happens with movements. Slowly, little by little, it seeps into everyday life. Movements made not out of anger, poison, or a desire for revenge become, over time, the norm. However, the problem with the current course of activism is that it leaves no room for discussion or individual expression.

All this is anger, anger and power struggle. You are either on the right side of history or the wrong side. Simply. And so, with no space or time to collect your own beliefs, individuals and especially corporations hold on to this aspect which is louder. In doing so, they stifle their own personal interpretation of the issue at hand.

The body positivity movement (and yes, I know, you’re supposed to call it the “body neutrality” movement now, which further underscores my point about toughness in today’s activism) has been one of the loudest and most vocal campaigns in our cage. times.

Did we really change anything at all?  Or is it one big lie to the world - and to ourselves?

Did we really change anything at all? Or is it one big lie to the world – and to ourselves?

However… it seemed that he just disappeared without even complaining. When I look back at the cover of Cosmo nearly half a decade later, I still wonder why Tess hasn’t become the face of a major beauty brand.

I also wonder why this issue of the magazine, which has garnered more public support and press coverage than any other in the past 10 years, ultimately sold less than the reality TV stars out front.

Did we really change anything at all? Or is it one big lie to the world – and to ourselves?

  • This article was originally published on Farrah’s Substack, Things Worth Knowing, farrah.substack.com
Jackyhttps://whatsnew2day.com/
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