Farmers affected by the drought reveal the hard mental tolls of the dry conditions that have caused

Emma Grabham (pictured) is a farmer near Bathurst, in the central west of New South Wales

From the sale of excess livestock and the confinement of livestock to smaller spaces to take second jobs, farmers are doing everything necessary to survive during a period of record drought.

The fifth-generation sheep-winner, Emma Grabham of Bathurst, in west central New South Wales, believes she has overcome the worst of the drought and can see the light at the end of a long, dry tunnel.

Ms. Grabham co-manages the 1,000-hectare merino and wool production properties that she and her husband purchased from their family in 2014, which is home to 2,000 sheep.

Emma Grabham (pictured) is a farmer near Bathurst, in the central west of New South Wales

Emma Grabham (pictured) is a farmer near Bathurst, in the central west of New South Wales

"Things are quite difficult since we have been feeding our stocks for months," Mrs. Grabham told Daily Mail Australia.

"The Midwest region went into a drought from the beginning, so we know that winter would be difficult, there was fear of the unknown of what the future holds."

Both she and her husband have jobs away from the farm to help make ends meet.

"We have not needed to ask for help, but we are quite stretched," said Mrs. Grabham.

"My husband has been working beyond the hours of the day, it's ridiculous, both physically and emotionally, but we are very grateful to have non-farm income that allowed us to maintain and feed the majority of our sheep through the drought "

They also made difficult decisions so that their actions would not reproduce, sell an excess of livestock and confine livestock to drought lots.

"There is nothing on the property for them to eat, so we have to provide everything that has been financially difficult," said Mrs. Grabham.

& # 39; We still have to feed them to a level where they are still producing. We have already postponed delivery this year. "

The conditions of drought forced Emma and her husband to confine the cattle (in the photo) to smaller spaces

The conditions of drought forced Emma and her husband to confine the cattle (in the photo) to smaller spaces

The conditions of drought forced Emma and her husband to confine the cattle (in the photo) to smaller spaces

The couple considered selling more shares to make ends meet.

"Cross your mind when you have hungry sheep to feed and you're trying to figure out how you're going to survive," said Mrs. Grabham.

After a recent rainy weather eased the conditions, she crossed her fingers and overcame the worst of the drought.

"Now that we have maintained everything during the winter, the goal now is to spend the spring and take a step back because we have been so resounding," Mrs. Grabham told Daily Mail Australia.

"We want to get to the stage where one of us is back on the farm full time, we can even have lambs again next year." We were facing the possibility of stopping again, before the recent rain came.

Emma Grabham hopes that one of her three children will one day take over the farm (pictured) and become sixth-generation farmers

Emma Grabham hopes that one of her three children will one day take over the farm (pictured) and become sixth-generation farmers

Emma Grabham hopes that one of her three children will one day take over the farm (pictured) and become sixth-generation farmers

In the longer term, the couple hopes that one of their three children will one day take over the farm.

"That's why we continue to do so, for the future," said Mrs. Grabham.

While Ms. Grabham says that she and her family are dealing with the cards they have been given, she knows that there are others who are dealing with mental health problems due to the cost of the drought.

"It's a huge problem, especially for the guys on the farm who work so hard and do not see an end in sight," said Mrs. Grabham.

"There is definitely a need for a strong emphasis on mental health."

Emma Grabham (pictured) and her husband refrained from giving birth this year because of the drought

Emma Grabham (pictured) and her husband refrained from giving birth this year because of the drought

Emma Grabham (pictured) and her husband refrained from giving birth this year because of the drought

"We are very grateful to have non-farm income that allowed us to maintain and feed the majority of our sheep during the drought," Emma Grabham told Daily Mail Australia.

Lifeline has teamed up with Bushells Tea in a new initiative called "Fancy a Cuppa?", Which encourages people to sit down together to discuss personal problems in their lives.

According to new Bushells research, one in four Australians believes that the drought has a significant impact on their line of work, with almost two in five people (37 percent) agreeing that it affects their emotional well-being.

Two-thirds of regional Australians believe they live in a supportive community and one in three knows their neighbor enough to approach and discuss their personal problems.

The Grabham considered selling more shares to make ends meet when things looked bleak

The Grabham considered selling more shares to make ends meet when things looked bleak

The Grabham considered selling more shares to make ends meet when things looked bleak

"A five-minute conversation is a great way to check with someone else to see if they're okay," said Mrs. Grabham.

"When you're buried working on the farm, it's important to be connected."

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"Now that we have maintained everything during the winter, the goal now is to spend the spring and take a step back because we have been so resounding," said Emma Grabham.

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