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Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson releases new work for the first time in 25 years

Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson released his first new work in 25 years on Tuesday, posted three cartoons on his website and unveiled his digital debut.

69-year-old Larson quit exhausting the deadline in 1995, but fans have since asked for more.

A website was launched last year that republished selections of The Far Side classics, but Tuesday’s revelations are the first new cartoons to appear in more than two decades.

Larson wrote on the site that the latest creations are the result of ‘having fun drawing again’ after discovering he made cartoons with digital tools.

Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson released his first new work Tuesday in 25 years above, pictured above, on a website created to display his older work launched last December

Far Side cartoonist Gary Larson released his first new work Tuesday in 25 years above, pictured above, on a website created to display his older work launched last December

Larson, 69, retired in 1995 and fans have been hungry for new cartoons ever since

Larson, 69, retired in 1995 and fans have been hungry for new cartoons ever since

Larson, 69, retired in 1995 and fans have been hungry for new cartoons ever since

In a new section of the site called ‘The New Stuff’, Larson warns ‘Enter if you dare’ while explaining his unexpected return.

“The point is that I really enjoyed my career as a syndicated cartoonist, and I hope we laughed together, at least spiritually,” he wrote.

“But after fifteen years of meeting deadlines, well, blah blah blah … you know the rest. The day after I retired, it felt good not to meet a deadline. And after moving on to other interests, drawing just wasn’t on my to-do list. Things change.’

The cartoonist then explains that he still continued to make cartoons, but only for an annual Christmas card to his wife, for which he generally used his traditional pen.

“Once a year I sat down to tackle Santa Claus, and every year it started with the same ritual: I swore at and then cleaned my hidden pen,” he said.

“So a few years ago – finally enough of my once-loyal but now reliable treacherous pen – I decided to try a digital tablet.”

Larson said that while he was struggling to get used to it, the move to a digital method and the new tools on offer interested him in redrawing and learning more.

“I just had no idea how far these things had evolved. Perhaps fittingly, the first thing I drew was a caveman, “he joked.

“The ‘new stuff’ you’ll see here is the result of my journey into the world of digital art,” Larson then explained.

“Trust me, this was a bit of a learning curve for me. I come from a world of pen and ink and suddenly I felt like I was behind the buttons of a 747.

Gary Larson, pictured above in 1985, said he rediscovered the love of drawing cartoons when a hidden pen drove him to use digital tools and discover a new method

Gary Larson, pictured above in 1985, said he rediscovered the love of drawing cartoons when a hidden pen drove him to use digital tools and discover a new method

Gary Larson, pictured above in 1985, said he rediscovered the love of drawing cartoons when a hidden pen drove him to use digital tools and discover a new method

Larson's work with The Far Side has appeared in nearly 2,000 newspapers and 40 million books around the world. Depicted are cartoons at the Museum of Natural History in New York

Larson's work with The Far Side has appeared in nearly 2,000 newspapers and 40 million books around the world. Depicted are cartoons at the Museum of Natural History in New York

Larson’s work with The Far Side has appeared in nearly 2,000 newspapers and 40 million books around the world. Depicted are cartoons at the Museum of Natural History in New York

“But as overwhelmed as I was, there was something else known – a sense of adventure.

“So here it goes. I have my coffee, I have a cool gadget and I have no deadlines. ‘

However, he warned fans that this is not The Far Side’s return, but a place for him to start exploring, experimenting and trying things.

The first three new cartoons show four bears picnicking Cub Cubs, a man hailing a taxidermist, and two aliens on the hunt, planning a “probe and release” of a man approaching in a truck.

They have also been depicted in a quaint style rather than his well-known line art, but still retain Larsen’s signature humor.

His return is heralded by fans and other cartoonists eager to see Larson’s latest creations in the digital age.

‘He’s back! We missed you Gary Larson, ‘Liniers tweeted, also known as Argentine cartoonist Ricardo Siri, who made a box to welcome his return.

Pictured, a cover of The Far Side in the 1980s

Pictured, a cover of The Far Side in the 1980s

A 1980s cover of The Far Side

A 1980s cover of The Far Side

Depicted, selected covers of The Far Side in the 1980s. The cartoons ran from 1980 until their creator Gary Larson decided to retire in 1995, citing deadline exhaustion.

Larson's return of new cartoons has been welcomed by fans. Pictured, an 80s cartoon

Larson's return of new cartoons has been welcomed by fans. Pictured, an 80s cartoon

Larson’s return of new cartoons has been welcomed by fans. Pictured, an 80s cartoon

Liniers said the Washington Post that Larson had an “enormous influence in my work”.

Daily The Far Side functions ran from 1980 until Larson’s retirement in 1995.

The single-panel cartoon first appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle before growing to appear in nearly 2,000 newspapers and 40 million books, according to CNN.

With his work, Larson has sold 77 million calendars and translated them into more than 17 languages.

The Far Side website was launched last December and attracted over a million visitors in the first week, according to the Washington Post, showing just how much Larson fans were still excited to see his work.

Despite showing only published work, the site won a People’s Voice Webby award for the best humor site in May.

Millions of fans of ‘The Far Side’ have faithfully read Gary’s old work for years, hoping forever that he will come back someday, ” Andy Sareyan, chief executive of the site’s Andrews McMeel, told The Washington Post .

“With all the madness that’s in the news these days, the timing of Gary’s absurdist outlook and comedic relief just couldn’t be better.”

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