Famous AFL Superfan Joffa Will Fight Allegations of Being a Sexual Predator

Most famous AFL fans, Jeff ‘Joffa’ Corfe, Collingwood’s cheer squad identity, will fight allegations that he is a child sex predator.

Corfe was charged with historic child sex in May for allegedly assaulting a 14-year-old boy in 2005.

The beloved Collingwood identity, who has shrugged off with some of the biggest names in the AFL, appeared in the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court Friday via video link.

Collingwood supporter Jeff 'Joffa' Corfe was arrested in Abbotsford, inner-city Melbourne, on Thursday, May 6.

Collingwood supporter Jeff ‘Joffa’ Corfe was arrested in Abbotsford, inner-city Melbourne, on Thursday, May 6.

Jeff 'Joffa' Corfe, sportswriter Caroline Wilson and former Collingwood President Eddie McGuire

Jeff 'Joffa' Corfe, sportswriter Caroline Wilson and former Collingwood President Eddie McGuire

Jeff ‘Joffa’ Corfe, sportswriter Caroline Wilson and former Collingwood President Eddie McGuire

Corfe (pictured in 2013) faces two counts of sexual penetration of a minor under 16

Corfe (pictured in 2013) faces two counts of sexual penetration of a minor under 16

Corfe (pictured in 2013) faces two counts of sexual penetration of a minor under 16

Gone were the signature blonde locks that were part of ‘Joffa’s’ colorful character behind the goals for years.

Instead, a tired and gray Corfe appeared on screen with a mask draped over his chin.

Corfe was arrested on May 6 in Abbotsford, in inner-city Melbourne, and charged with two counts of sexually penetrating a minor under 16.

On Friday, his attorney Louis Dean told the court that his client would challenge the charges because he denied being the actual perpetrator identified by his alleged victim.

Three witnesses to the prosecution will testify against Corfe when the case returns for dispute in December.

Corfe, who has returned to Melbourne from Queensland to challenge the charges, remains out on bail until then.’

The Magpie fan lived in Fiji for nine months last year and returned to Australia in October.

He completed the mandatory hotel quarantine in Sydney before settling in Queensland.

The day before his arrest, Corfe told his 7,000 Instagram followers that he was visiting Melbourne – his “home” for five days.

The regular social media user has rarely posted anything on his accounts since his arrest.

Joffa and Channel 7 Sunrise to host David Koch in Melbourne in 2016

Joffa and Channel 7 Sunrise to host David Koch in Melbourne in 2016

Joffa and Channel 7 Sunrise to host David Koch in Melbourne in 2016

Joffa and former prime minister wannabe Bill Shorten

Joffa and former prime minister wannabe Bill Shorten

Joffa and former prime minister wannabe Bill Shorten

Magpies cheersquad legend Joffa Corfe celebrates a goal during the AFL Preliminary Final match between the Richmond Tigers and the Collingwood Magpies on September 21, 2018

Magpies cheersquad legend Joffa Corfe celebrates a goal during the AFL Preliminary Final match between the Richmond Tigers and the Collingwood Magpies on September 21, 2018

Magpies cheersquad legend Joffa Corfe celebrates a goal during the AFL Preliminary Final match between the Richmond Tigers and the Collingwood Magpies on September 21, 2018

Corfe was convicted in March by Collingwood for alleged racist comments about Indian migrant workers spreading Covid-19.

“Firing all Indian aged care workers could be a start,” Corfe tweeted about how to stop the spread of Covid-19.

After responding to his comments, Corfe had no remorse.

“I won’t be silenced by the bulls**t minority pretending to be the benefactors – I’ll have the balls to say and tweet what I want,” he said.

Collingwood responded, although Corfe was no longer a member of the club or ever held a position with the club.

“Joffa Corfe is not a member of the Collingwood Football Club but has a long relationship with our organization,” a club statement read.

“As such, we cannot support his comments from last night. We condemn them and ask him to reflect on the pain he has caused and an appropriate apology.”

Joffa with former Magpie great and commentator Brian Taylor

Joffa with former Magpie great and commentator Brian Taylor

Joffa with former Magpie great and commentator Brian Taylor

Former Essendon coach Kevin Sheedy and Joffa

Former Essendon coach Kevin Sheedy and Joffa

Former Essendon coach Kevin Sheedy and Joffa

Hawthorn great Leigh Matthews and Joffa

Hawthorn great Leigh Matthews and Joffa

Hawthorn great Leigh Matthews and Joffa

In 2019, Corfe said he would boycott games until the AFL apologized for its crackdown on supporter behavior.

In a Facebook post, the superfan confirmed that all future games were off limits following a spate of incidents in which fans were banned and kicked out of games for comment.

“I will not attend another AFL game until Gill comes out and apologizes to all the supporters for the way we are being treated,” he wrote at the time.

“Someone (sic) needs to take a stand on behalf of all other decent like-minded supporters in the way we have been portrayed.

“Football is all about banter and fun cheering and making an effort at the referee. It’s about us, you and me.’

Corfe rose to fame in Melbourne in the early 2000s when he would deliver a speech to Collingwood matches at a pub across the road from the MCG.

He wore a wig made of yellow glitter for years before Collingwood president Eddie McGuire gifted him a gold jacket.

Television cameras would train on Corfe in the final quarter, when the larrikin supporter would don the jacket to indicate that he believed Collingwood would win the match.

Corfe became a popular identity at Melbourne football shows, regularly mingling with some of the best AFL players to ever put on the shoes.

.