Family struggle for liquor licenses leads to the Supreme Court

Family struggle for liquor licenses leads to the Supreme Court

Associated Press

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Doug and Mary Ketchum chose Memphis, Tennessee, as a place to live with their disabled adult daughter because it has clearer air than their previous home in Utah.

That was the easy part. Their decision to maintain themselves by buying a liquor store is considerably more complicated and forms the core of a case before the Supreme Court which is being argued on Wednesday.

The Ketchums say that Tennessee makes it almost impossible for anyone to break into the liquor trade from the state. They claim, and lower judges have agreed, that the law of Tennessee forces people to live in the state for two years to get a license to sell alcohol and 10 years to renew a license, unconstitutional is because it discriminates against non-state interests.

In this image of Karen Pulfer Focht, Doug Ketchum and his wife Mary and their daughter Stacie pose as their liquor store in Memphis, Kimbrough Wine & Spirits. The US Supreme Court will hear a dispute about Tennessee's residency towards slipper owners. Doug and Mary Ketchum moved from Utah to Memphis and say that Tennessee makes it almost impossible for anyone to break out of the state in the liquor store. (Karen Pulfer Focht)

In this image of Karen Pulfer Focht, Doug Ketchum and his wife Mary and their daughter Stacie pose as their liquor store in Memphis, Kimbrough Wine & Spirits. The US Supreme Court will hear a dispute about Tennessee's residency towards slipper owners. Doug and Mary Ketchum moved from Utah to Memphis and say that Tennessee makes it almost impossible for anyone to break out of the state in the liquor store. (Karen Pulfer Focht)

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