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Family shares photos of woman, 88, with Alzheimer’s disease to show the change due to loneliness in lockdown

A North Carolina family has expressed concern about the dangerous impact loneliness and isolation have on their elderly mother due to coronavirus blockage.

The family of 88-year-old Peggy Wall shared two shocking photos of the nursing home resident showing her dramatic decline since the start of the blockage.

Wall, who has Alzheimer’s disease, was not infected with coronavirus, but instead suffered from loneliness because she couldn’t see her family.

Her son Tim told it WFMY-TV that he thought “isolation is really worse than the virus” when it came to his mother’s health at the nursing home in Kernersville.

Peggy Wall looked healthier before shutting down

Peggy Wall pictured after her family's four-month divorce

Peggy Wall pictured after her family's four-month divorce

88-year-old Peggy Wall has not seen her family in four months because of the strict ban on visitors to her North Carolina nursing home because of the coronavirus pandemic. Her family shared this photo of her before the closing (left photo) and now (right photo) to show the impact loneliness and isolation had on her heath when they called for the ban to be lifted

Wall was unable to see her family in person for four months because of the strict visitor ban for nursing home residents.

Retirement homes were one of the first hot spots to emerge when the pandemic hit the United States and thousands of residents died across the province.

“It just feels like you are seeing them disappear before your eyes and there is nothing you can do about it,” said Tim.

He shared two photos of his mother – one from before the closure and one from what she looks like now – to highlight the grim change in her appearance over the past few months.

While she’s still smiling, Peggy’s facial features seem more shrunken as she enters another month of family separation.

“I know their hands are tied. They have to do what the governor has ordered, but it is not a holistic approach. It is a warehouse; they are fed and watered, “added Tim, speaking of regrets that he had not been with his mother for the past few months.

“Time is not your friend, you have to live in the moment. And we have lost so many moments. During this period. And just try to figure out what else I can do. ‘

Peggy, 88, who has Alzheimer's, suffered dramatically from not being able to see her family, says her son Tim

Peggy, 88, who has Alzheimer's, suffered dramatically from not being able to see her family, says her son Tim

Peggy, 88, who has Alzheimer’s, suffered dramatically from not being able to see her family, says her son Tim

Many other families have the same concerns when they ask to change the strict rules in nursing homes and have families revisit their loved ones.

They state that visitors should be allowed to use personal protective equipment, social distance and testing to ensure residents are safe.

Families also claim that a visitor who has been tested negative for coronavirus and who wears protective clothing is the same as an employee.

“Employees go home every day at the end of their shift. How is that different from when I visit if I follow the same safety guidelines? a family member told WFMY-TV.

“For many of these patients, it’s a matter of life and death, so the conversation has to be had and it has to be heard,” added Priscilla Jean-Louis, whose mother has dementia.

“What you see is a decline, a rapid deterioration in the health of these family members. They don’t die from COVID, they die from isolation. ‘

She says she will use her platform as a blogger to highlight the issue and put pressure on the Federal Nursing Home Commission for COVID-19 to make the necessary changes.

Family pressure comes after the White House sets up the Coronavirus Committee on Safety and Quality in Nursing Homes, where a few advocacy groups have started sending their suggestions.

The groups believe that outdoor visits and the wearing of protective clothing should now be allowed.

Peggy, pictured second from left here with her family, faces another month of people unable to visit her family as coronavirus pandemic and locks continue

Peggy, pictured second from left here with her family, faces another month of people unable to visit her family as coronavirus pandemic and locks continue

Peggy, pictured second from left here with her family, faces another month of people unable to visit her family as coronavirus pandemic and locks continue

The number of coronavirus deaths continues to rise in the US, but has not returned to the shocking figures of March and April.

The outbreak in the first few weeks was plagued by nursing homes, while the infections have occurred in younger, healthier individuals this summer.

Hospitals have also found better treatments, such as laying patients on the abdomen and using the antiviral Remdesivir.

However, nursing homes are still the most severely affected industry in the US in terms of COVID-19 deaths.

The death toll is so high because their population is elderly and living close together, making them more vulnerable.

In Florida alone, a total of 2,550 residents and long-term care personnel have died, accounting for about 45 percent of all virus deaths in Florida.

The federal government sent 14 million masks and 13 million gowns to nursing homes, but some Florida providers said they were unusable.

Others have not received them at all.

About 180 out of 10,000 residents of the long-term care facility have died in Florida so far, a toll still much lower than in some northeastern states, where deaths increased at the height of the pandemic in March and April.

New York had about 400 deaths per 10,000 nursing home residents and New Jersey more than 1,100.

There are now more than 4.1 million cases of coronavirus in the US and more than 145,000 deaths.

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