Family responsible for opioid crisis tried to wipe out 1975 suicide of Purdue Pharma heir Bobby Sackler

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The family responsible for the opioid crisis in the United States tried to obliterate the 1975 suicide of Purdue Pharma heir Bobby Sackler, 24, who was addicted to heroin, a new book claims.

The story of Bobby, the son of pharma giant Mortimer Sackler, was not featured in newspapers at the time, but is documented in a new book Empire of Pain by Patrick Radden Keefe, who found and interviewed witnesses to his suicide.

In the book, scheduled for release on Tuesday, Radden Keefe claims that Bobby’s drug addictions were “ an uncomfortable truth and a huge embarrassment ” for the family, the New York Post – who has assessed an advance.

Bobby left his apartment on East 64th Street in New York City on the morning of July 5, 1975 to visit the home of his mother, Muriel Sackler, on East 86th Street, who was separated from his powerful father. Muriel, she says, died in 2009 obituary

He fought with the elevator operator when he got to the lobby before bursting into his mother’s two bedrooms on the ninth floor, Radden Keefe revealed.

Bobby was overheard arguing with her as he demanded money in the moments before breaking a window and falling to his death.

Mortimer Sackler, left, is pictured with Dame Theresa Sackler in 2004, about 30 years after his son's death

Mortimer Sackler, left, is pictured with Dame Theresa Sackler in 2004, about 30 years after his son’s death

The surprising allegations against the Sackler family are described in a new book by Patrick Radden Keefe

The surprising allegations against the Sackler family are described in a new book by Patrick Radden Keefe

The surprising allegations against the Sackler family are described in a new book by Patrick Radden Keefe

The Sackler family, largely responsible for the opioid pandemic, produces OxyContin

The Sackler family, largely responsible for the opioid pandemic, produces OxyContin

The Sackler family, largely responsible for the opioid pandemic, produces OxyContin

The young heir had a history of hospitalization in mental institutions and used heroin and PCP every day, Radden Keefe revealed.

Ceferino Perez, an old porter in the building where Muriel lived, told Radden Keefe that Bobby was “a little cuckoo.”

“He was the kind of man no one would hire,” Perez said.

He said he heard the sound of breaking glass as Bobby jumped out of the building.

Then a much louder, denser sound as something heavy landed on the sidewalk. The impact was so intense it sounded like a car accident, ”Radden Keefe writes in the book, according to the New York Post.

But when Perez looked, he saw a body lying on the sidewalk. It was Bobby Sackler. He had fallen nine floors. His head had burst on the sidewalk. ‘

Muriel called to the front desk and told them that Bobby broke the window with a chair and asked if her son was dead.

Perez then had to inform the distraught mother that her son had indeed died.

The family made a small funeral announcement in The New York Times on July 9 stating only that Bobby had died “ suddenly in the 24th year of life. ”

Bobby had reportedly been unemployed while he was in a his father’s luxurious building.

‘He was crazy. Completely out of hand, “a family friend said to Radden Keefe. The family friend described how Bobby once roamed Central Park naked.

Bobby’s death has since hit the media, but not as thoroughly as in the new book.

Raymond and Beverly Sackler of the Sackler family are shown in an undated photo

Raymond and Beverly Sackler of the Sackler family are shown in an undated photo

Raymond and Beverly Sackler of the Sackler family are shown in an undated photo

Mortimer and Theresa Sackler are photographed together with their daughter Marissa in 2003

Mortimer and Theresa Sackler are photographed together with their daughter Marissa in 2003

Mortimer and Theresa Sackler are photographed together with their daughter Marissa in 2003

Purdue Pharma headquarters will be on display in downtown Stamford, Connecticut in 2019

Purdue Pharma headquarters will be on display in downtown Stamford, Connecticut in 2019

Purdue Pharma headquarters will be on display in downtown Stamford, Connecticut in 2019

In 2019, a protest at the Guggenheim against the Sackler family included small flyers of fake recipes prepared by a ‘Robert Sackler, MD’ to a Solomon R. Guggenheim for 80 milligram pills of OxyContin, the New Yorker reported.

Mortimer Sackler bought the company in 1952, and his brothers Raymond and Arthur also had “ a stake in the company ” before turning it into the drug empire it became, the New York Post reported.

Arthur Sackler had previously worked for a drug marketing company that helped launch drugs, including Librium and Valium, before the family eventually made billions from OxyContin.

The Sacklers were criticized for the 2019 opioid epidemic when a lawsuit was filed against eight family members in New York’s Southern District.

Court documents revealed that Purdue Pharma had misled the public about the dangers of Oxycontin, which is highly addictive, after the company launched it in 1996.

The Justice Department announced a settlement with the Sackler family in October that details criminal charges against the Purdue Pharma company.

“The misuse and diversion of prescription opioids has contributed to a national tragedy of addiction and deaths, in addition to that caused by illegal street opioids,” said Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen.

With criminal guilty pleas, a federal settlement of more than $ 8 billion, and the dissolution of a company and the repurposing of its assets entirely for the benefit of the public, the resolution in today’s announcement reaffirms that the Justice Department will not give in – continued efforts to combat the opioid crisis. ‘

New York Attorney General Letitia James issued a statement after the Justice Department announced the deal with the Sacklers.

“As our country continues to recover from the pain and destruction left by the greed of the Sacklers, this family has sought to evade responsibility and suppress the millions of victims of the opioid crisis,” she wrote.

“Today’s deal does not take into account the hundreds of thousands of deaths or millions of addictions caused by Purdue Pharma and the Sackler family.”

She continued, “Instead, billionaires can keep their billions without taking into account how much they actually made.”

“We are determined to hold the Sacklers and others accountable for the role they played in fueling the opioid crisis,” she said.

CTV News reported last month that, according to new court documents, Purdue Pharma “ filed a restructuring plan to dissolve itself and create a new company dedicated to programs designed to combat the opioid crisis. ”

The Sacklers have agreed to pay out an additional $ 4.2 billion over the next nine years under the proposed plan to end a number of civil claims against them.