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Family of Daunte Wright, killed by police in 2021, agrees $3.25m settlement deal with Minnesota city

Daunte Wright's family, killed by a white cop during a traffic stop last year, receives $3.25 million settlement from the city of Brooklyn Center, Minnesota

Daunte Wright’s family, killed by a white cop during a traffic stop last year, receives $3.25 million settlement from the city of Brooklyn Center, Minnesota

The city of Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, has reached a $3.25 million settlement with the family of Daunte Wright, a black man killed by a white cop during a traffic stop last year, family lawyers said.

The amount is part of a settlement agreement with the family after police officer Kim Potter, 26, shot and killed Wright when she allegedly mistook her firearm for her taser when she tried to arrest him.

The city also agreed to make changes to its policing policy, including on issues such as agent intervention, implied bias, gun confusion, mental health crises and other issues, along with a permanent memorial to Wright.

Police arrested Wright on April 11, 2021 for an expired label and illegal air freshener.

The Brooklyn Center Police Department then discovered that Wright had a 2018 outstanding warrant issued after he strangled a woman and threatened to shoot her if she didn’t hand over $820 in her bra, court papers jubilated.

Kim Potter, 26, was convicted of first- and second-degree manslaughter.  Her sentence was under sentencing guidelines of approximately seven years, and the maximum of fifteen years allowed by the state of Minnesota for first-degree manslaughter.

Kim Potter, 26, was convicted of first- and second-degree manslaughter. Her sentence was under sentencing guidelines of approximately seven years, and the maximum of fifteen years allowed by the state of Minnesota for first-degree manslaughter.

This video frame grab, taken from bodycam footage released by the Minnesota Police Department on April 12, 2021, shows the deadly police recording of Daunte Wright during a traffic stop on Sunday

This video frame grab, taken from bodycam footage released by the Minnesota Police Department on April 12, 2021, shows the deadly police recording of Daunte Wright during a traffic stop on Sunday

Bodycam footage showed Potter grabbing her gun instead of her taser.  She yells 'Taser!'  repeatedly, signaling the other officers to get out of the way before shooting Wright

After he drives away she says 'Oh my god I shot him'

Bodycam footage showed Potter grabbing her gun instead of her taser. She yells ‘Taser!’ repeatedly, signaling the other officers to get out of the way before shooting Wright. After he drives away she says ‘Oh my god I shot him’

Judge Regina Chu (pictured) explained her decision to reduce Potter's jail term and said there was no doubt that Potter

Judge Regina Chu (pictured) explained her decision to reduce Potter’s jail term and said there was no doubt that Potter “had no intention of hurting anyone” when she shot Wright

Daunte Wright's mother Katie said Friday after the verdict was handed down:

Daunte Wright’s mother Katie said Friday after the verdict was handed down: “We are very disappointed with the outcome. This is not okay. This is the problem with our legal system. White woman tears trump justice. I thought my white woman’s tears would be good enough’

Wright would face charges of attempted aggravated theft – with a possible maximum sentence of 20 years in prison

But when Potter and a student officer tried to arrest him, Wright tried to drive away.

Potter, mother of two, shot Wright and said she mistook her gun for a Taser.

She was taken away in handcuffs after serving a two-year sentence for murdering Daunte Wright — of which she will serve 14 months — after being found guilty on all counts in February in Hennepin County Court.

She was convicted of first- and second-degree manslaughter. Her sentence was less than the sentencing guidelines of about seven years, and the maximum of 15 years allowed by the state of Minnesota for first degree manslaughter.

Potter, a 26-year veteran of the Corps - pictured here in 2007 - claimed she accidentally shot Daunte Wright when she reached for her pistol rather than her taser during a traffic stop over his expired license plates

Daunte Wright, 20, was arrested for hanging an air freshener from his rearview mirror and expired license plates

Kim Potter (left), a 26-year police veteran, claimed she accidentally shot Daunte Wright (right) when she reached for her gun instead of her taser during a traffic stop over his expired license plates in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota on April 11

Potter, who sobbed heavily during sentencing, has now been transferred to the Minnesota Correctional Facility – Shakopee, a five-story security prison located about 25 miles southwest of downtown Minneapolis.

The convicted ex-cop will remain in the facility until at least her conviction. While it is likely, it is unclear if she will serve her entire sentence in Shakopee.

“The comprehensive settlement in this tragic case will bring a meaningful measure of responsibility to the family for their deep loss of a son, sibling and father, and they hope and believe that the measures of change in policing, policy and education will make significant improvements.” to the community on behalf of Daunte,” family attorney Antonio Romanucci said in the statement.

“Nothing can bring him back, but the family hopes his legacy is positive and prevents other families from going through the kind of grief they will live with for the rest of their lives.”

Potter will serve her sentence at Minnesota Correctional Facility - Shakopee, a facility that cares for approximately 650 female inmates and offers a variety of prison programs designed to aid in rehabilitation.  Pictured: Shakopee inmates in a classroom

Potter will serve her sentence at Minnesota Correctional Facility – Shakopee, a facility that cares for approximately 650 female inmates and offers a variety of prison programs designed to aid in rehabilitation. Pictured: Shakopee inmates in a classroom

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