Famed Doctor Charlie Teo Says He Could STOP Neurosurgery As His Enemies Try To Ruin His Career

The famous neurosurgeon Dr. Charlie Teo is considering ending his career for good after medical restrictions were imposed on his work, and claims his critics are fighting hard to bring him down.

Temporary restrictions on the famed Sydney doctor’s medical license have been imposed by the NSW Medical Council after complaints were made about his work, including allegations of inappropriate behaviour.

In the eyes of Dr. Teo, this means that his enemies are finally ‘going for the kill’, tellingly: The Saturday Telegraph an attacker he calls “The Mole” has spent years destroying his reputation.

One patient said she had surgery in 2003 by Dr. Teo, but later claims that she discovered that the surgeon had not removed the tumor and operated on the wrong side of her brain.

In the wake of the protest, the neurosurgeon has decided to take three months off work to assess whether a 35-year career is worth continuing.

Renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Charlie Teo considers leaving his career after putting medical restrictions on his job

Well-meaning colleagues have warned me over the years to be less vocal and to stop giving conflicting second opinions, because if the day came when I faced the medical board, there would be no surgeon at all. to support me. I naively ignored those warnings.’ Dr Teo told the publication.

He cites his “great personality” and the fact that he trained in the US as the reasons why his colleagues quickly fired him.

The high-profile doctor is known for performing “last chance” brain surgery on patients after other neurosurgeons deemed their condition useless.

But he has been criticized by some who claim he overcharges patients and acted inappropriately in the operating room.

dr. Teo said “The Mole” was determined to portray him as a “money-hungry sexual predator.”

In September 2019, an allegation surfaced that Dr. Teo had told a nurse “while you’re down there…” as she bent to pick something up.

The neurosurgeon admitted to making the “bad joke” but said it was taken out of context and the nurse in question had been with him for 12 years, was like a “sister” and the couple always joked together .

The nurse told the publication that it was taken as a joke and that she was not offended in any way.

Temporary restrictions have been placed on the famed Sydney doctor's medical license by the NSW Medical Council after complaints were made about his work, including allegations of inappropriate behaviour.

Temporary restrictions have been placed on the famed Sydney doctor’s medical license by the NSW Medical Council after complaints were made about his work, including allegations of inappropriate behaviour.

Other complaints filed against him by disgruntled colleagues include the idea that he overcharges patients for his own financial gain — a claim Dr. Teo insults him the most.

He claimed that if the claims were true, he would not spend months of the year doing charity work abroad or funding a hospital in India out of pocket.

He described his home and suburb as modest and admits to wearing his clothes until they are ready to be thrown away.

When there was controversy surrounding a surgery costing $120,000, Dr. Teo that $80,000 was for hospital expenses, with the rest split between health care providers.

‘For the past 20 years I have offered to operate on public patients for free in the public system, in their hometown. For this, their local neurosurgeon would have to invite me to operate there and in 20 years I’ve only been invited twice,” he said.

Former patient, Michelle Smith, of western Sydney, was operated on by Dr. teo.

When doctors later reviewed her MRI scans, they suspected a craniotomy had been performed on the left side of her brain, despite her tumor being on the right side. Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Ms Smith said she was forced to leave school in grade 10 because she suffered from seizures.

At age 19, she underwent $46,000 surgery by Dr. Teo and was sent home the next day, but the attacks continued for years after.

She went on to say that the MRI scans showed no evidence of surgery on the tumor, but instead suggested scar tissue that Dr. Teo may have operated on the other side of her brain.

In 2016, she was operated on for free again by another neurosurgeon who removed the tumor.

Ms Smith took legal action against Dr. Teo and the case was settled out of court.

dr.  Teo cites his 'great personality' and the fact that he trained in the US as the reasons his colleagues were quick to fire him

dr. Teo cites his ‘great personality’ and the fact that he trained in the US as the reasons his colleagues were quick to fire him

The neurosurgeon said he was justified in performing the surgery as he did.

He described the operation as ‘Dura [outer layer of tissue] opened and reflected. Right mesial posterior parietal [position in brain] tumor approached from a left-sided craniotomy. Falxciotomy performed for access to the right side of the brain,” the publication reported.

dr. Teo said that of the 11,000 patients he had operated on for over 35 years, he had been charged twice.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Dr. Teo for further comment.

The NSW Medical Board has commissioned Dr Teo to prove that he explained the financial costs and risks to patients prior to surgery.

He may also only perform certain operations after written permission from a fellow neurosurgeon.

The restrictions follow the NSW medical board calling on Dr Teo last week to attend an ‘immediate action panel’.

The neurosurgeon (pictured with partner) has decided to take three months off work to weigh up whether a 35-year career is worth the toll on him and his family

The neurosurgeon (pictured with partner) has decided to take three months off work to weigh up whether a 35-year career is worth the toll on him and his family

The neurosurgeon accepted the directions and said he always consulted a colleague, often from a leading medical school.

As part of the guidelines, he will review the results of surgery afterwards with a colleague.

dr. Teo said he felt “emotionally drained” from being forced to compete not only with the medical board but also bitter colleagues who were “jealous of his success.”

He is now concerned that his way of working may be clouded by his “own professional survival” and what has been enforced by the municipality instead of the method he normally uses: treating each patient as if they were a member of his family.

“I don’t want to be one of the doctors I never wanted to be. I’ve never wanted to be one of those surgeons who put their own interests ahead of their patients’ interests,” he said.

Since the restrictions were imposed, hundreds of patients and their families have shared testimonies of Dr. Defending and praising Teo for his work.

Australian model Cheyenne Tozzi defended Dr Teo who operated on her mother after she was diagnosed with multiple brain tumors in 2013.

Australian model Cheyenne Tozzi defended Dr Teo who operated on her mother after she was diagnosed with multiple brain tumors in 2013.

Radio host Ben Fordham labeled the decision to restrict his work as “outrageous.”

“I think this is one of the most shameful decisions we’ve seen in a long, long time,” Fordham said in his 2GB breakfast program on Wednesday.

“I know people alive now who wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for Dr. Charlie Teo.”

The messages of support were led by Australian model and singer Cheyenne Tozzi, who is Dr. Teo as a good friend.

The neurosurgeon operated on and saved the life of Tozzi’s mother Yvonne after she was diagnosed with multiple brain tumors in 2013.

Yvonne was fully discharged 12 months later after undergoing the surgery.

Tozzi posted a photo next to her mother’s bed in the hospital in 2013, along with photos of herself and Yvonne with Dr. teo.

“A lot has been said about Dr. Charlie Teo,” Tozzi wrote.

“I think he’s a wonderful man and an incredibly talented physician and neurosurgeon. He has the mind of a gifted fighter and a heart of gold.

“He also saved my mother’s life, and his wicked sense of humor put her at ease through many scary moments.”

dr. Teo, who has four daughters, said his children wept at the news that he may be leaving his career behind for good.

He said he wanted the world to know that he loved his patients and always wanted to treat them with respect.

dr.  Teo, father of four, said his children wept at the news that he may be leaving his career behind for good

dr. Teo, father of four, said his children wept at the news that he may be leaving his career behind for good

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