Facebook’s new CTO once said ‘it was OK to plan terror attacks on the site’

The Facebook executive who will become the company’s chief technology officer next year had argued in 2016 that Facebook’s goal should be to connect people, even if “someone dies in a terrorist attack coordinated on our tools,” according to an internal memo.

Andrew Bosworth, recruited in 2022 to replace longtime CTO Mike Schroepfer, had discussed Facebook’s role in the world in a memo with other leaders when he noted that the company’s value to the world was so great that its negative impacts on had to be overlooked.

“The ugly truth is that we believe in connecting people so deeply that anything we can connect people with more often is de facto good,” Bosworth wrote.

“It might cost a life exposing someone to bullies. Someone might die in a coordinated terrorist attack on our tools. And yet we connect people.’

Facebook’s new CTO Andrew Bosworth had said in 2016 that the social media giant must do everything it can to connect people, even if it leads to terrorist attacks.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Outgoing CTO Mike Schroepfer

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, left, said he strongly disagreed with Bosworth in 2016, but now he’s tapped Bosworth to replace longtime CTO Mike Schroepfer, right

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who has known Bosworth since their days at Harvard University, said at the time that he “completely disagrees” with Bosworth’s comments, the Telegraph reported.

Bosworth, head of Facebook’s augments and virtual reality projects, said in 2018 that he was making a comment to encourage discussion about Facebook’s responsibilities and that it didn’t reflect his or the company’s views. Independent reported.

“I do not agree with today’s message and I did not agree with it even when I wrote it,” Mr Bosworth said in a statement.

He added that he “cares deeply about how our product affects people and I take very personally the responsibility I have to make that impact positive.”

Facebook has been dealing with the social media platform used by terrorists and extremists since its inception.

According to the latest transparency report, Facebook deleted 7.1 million posts about terrorism from April to June and about 6.2 million posts about hate groups during the same period.

The company said it finds about 99.7 percent of its content atomic before being reported by users, the Telegraph reports.

Bosworth, who led Facebook's augmented and virtual reality projects, plans to use the technology to establish Facebook's metaverse.  He is pictured at a conference in 2018

Bosworth, who led Facebook’s augmented and virtual reality projects, plans to use the technology to establish Facebook’s metaverse. He is pictured at a conference in 2018

Facebook had announced Bosworth’s promotion on Wednesday, revealing that it would lead the company into the latest technological stage.

“As our next CTO, Boz will continue to lead Facebook Reality Labs and oversee our work in augmented reality, virtual reality and more, and as part of this transition, a few other groups will also join Boz’s team,” said CEO Mark Zuckerberg. in a message to employees posted on Facebook’s blog.

“All of this is foundational to our broader efforts to help build the metaverse, and I’m excited about the future of this work led by Boz,” he said, referring to the Silicon Valley idea of ​​shared spaces that connect the digital and physical. worlds and are accessible through various devices.

Bozworth will lead Facebook's efforts to combine virtual reality with its day-to-day services

Bozworth will lead Facebook’s efforts to combine virtual reality with its day-to-day services

Facebook's goal is to create virtual social media, with Bosworth leading the way

Facebook’s goal is to create virtual social media, with Bosworth leading the way

Facebook has come under pressure from global regulators, lawmakers and civil society groups who have criticized it for abuses on its platform, such as extremism and misinformation, and want it to improve on a range of issues, including transparency, its content moderation and recommendation systems, and its approaches to user privacy and security.

According to the documents leaked to the Wall Street Journal, Facebook had known for two years that Instagram is toxic to young girls, but continued to add beauty editing filters to the app, despite six percent of suicidal girls in America blaming the app for their desire to commit suicide.

When Facebook investigations first notified the company of the issue in 2019, they said, “We’re making body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls.”

Teens blame Instagram for the rise in anxiety and depression. This response was spontaneous and consistent in all groups.’

A post posted to an internal bulletin board in March 2020 said the app revealed that 32 percent of girls said Instagram made them feel worse about their bodies if they already had insecurities.

About one in five said the app made them feel worse about themselves.

This is part of the research Facebook showed on how Instagram harms teens

This is part of the research Facebook showed on how Instagram harms teens

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