Facebook's acceptance rate has fallen sharply in the aftermath of Cambridge Analytica, claims report

Facebook's acceptance rate has fallen sharply in the aftermath of Cambridge Analytica and other privacy scandals, claims report

  • According to a report, Facebook is struggling with hiring talent after Cambridge Analytica
  • The acceptance figures dropped from 85 percent to 35-55 percent in about a year
  • The news reflects feelings that were reported last year that the company's morale was low

A series of scandals has not only affected the morale of current employees on Facebook, but is also likely to delay the recruitment of new talent by the company according to a new report.

As reported by CNBC, several former recruiters for the controversial social media giant say recent controversies such as Cambridge Analytica, which endangered 87 million Facebook user data in an attempt to target advertisements for President Donald Trump during the 2016 election, have led candidates to regularly have declined their job offers.

In interviews with half a dozen former recruiters, CNBC reports that recruiters have a & # 39; significant decrease & # 39; of the number of accepted vacancies have been reported since the Cambridge Analytica scandal was announced last March.

A new CNBC report shows that new graduates are less likely to take a job on Facebook because of a lot of scandals, including Cambridge Analytica

A new CNBC report shows that new graduates are less likely to take a job on Facebook because of a lot of scandals, including Cambridge Analytica

Specifically, unnamed recruiters say in the report, acceptance rates fell from around 85 percent between 2017 and 2018 for new graduates who are offered full-time jobs to between 35 and 55 percent from December.

Carnegie Mellon, which has one of the best computer science programs in the US, now has an acceptance rate of 35 percent among new graduates, CNBC said.

According to CNBC, Facebook has contested the reports with the words & # 39; these numbers are totally wrong & # 39 ;.

The spokesperson also noted that the total number of Facebook employees grew by 36 percent on an annual basis, but did not provide any evidence to counter the accounts of his recruiters.

The news of Facebook's problems in recruiting new talent reflects a previous report that draws attention to current employees who have also been hit by a series of scandals.

An internal survey obtained by The Wall Street Journal last year it appears that only 52 percent of Facebook employees said they were optimistic about the future of the company – a sharp fall of 84 percent in 2017.

The data came from Facebook's biennial & # 39; pulse & # 39; survey and received responses from around 29,000 Facebook employees, the Journal reported.

In addition, about 53 percent of the employees in the survey believed that Facebook & # 39; makes the world better & # 39 ;, which is a significant drop of 72 percent in 2017.

On average, those employees said they were planning to stay on Facebook for another 3.9 years, 4.3 years ago a year earlier.

Facebook fired back at the report and said the numbers provided by users were & # 39; totally wrong & # 39; and that the company continued to expand its number of employees

Facebook fired back at the report and said the numbers provided by users were & # 39; totally wrong & # 39; and that the company continued to expand its number of employees

Facebook fired back at the report and said the numbers provided by users were & # 39; totally wrong & # 39; and that the company continued to expand its number of employees

Specifically, those employees say they are frustrated by continuing turbulence at the top of the company, as well as the falling stock price, which has shaved off part of the value of their stock options – an important source of compensation for many.

If scandals and stock prices are indicative, sentiment is unlikely to change, since Facebook, since the survey, is still being scrutinized for the processing of users' personal data.

In April, the company confirmed that millions of users of Instagram, the photo and video platform of Facebook had shown their passwords.

The company too revealed that it inexplicably saved hundreds of millions of user passwords in plain text in March.

Due to privacy issues and negative publicity, Facebook struggled with users who suffered from bleeding.

WHAT IS THE CAMBRIDGE ANALYTICA SCANDAL?

The Cambridge Analytica communications company has offices in London, New York, Washington, but also in Brazil and Malaysia.

The company can boast of finding your voters and putting them into action through data-driven campaigns and a team that includes data scientists and behavioral psychologists.

& # 39; In the United States alone, we have played a crucial role in winning presidential races and in congress and state elections & # 39 ;, Cambridge Analytica claims on its website with data on more than 230 million US voters.

The company benefited from a feature that meant that apps could request permission to access your own data, as well as the data from all your Facebook friends.

The data group suspended its chief executive, Alexander Nix (photo), after shooting him with a series of controversial claims, including the impression that Cambridge Analytica played a crucial role in the election of Donald Trump

The data group suspended its chief executive, Alexander Nix (photo), after shooting him with a series of controversial claims, including the impression that Cambridge Analytica played a crucial role in the election of Donald Trump

The data product suspended his president, Alexander Nix (photo), after making a number of controversial claims, including the impression that Cambridge Analytica played a crucial role in the election of Donald Trump

This meant that the company could extract the information from 87 million Facebook users, although only 270,000 people gave their permission to do so.

This is designed to help them create software that can predict and influence voters' choices at the polls.

The data product suspended its president, Alexander Nix, after the recordings of him emerged making a series of controversial claims, including that Cambridge Analytica had a pivotal role in Donald Trump's election.

This information is said to have been used to support the Brexit campaign in the UK.

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