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Facebook tells users the source and date of coronavirus stories before sharing them

Facebook warns users before resharing content by displaying source and date to address misinformation and outdated articles on the platform

  • Facebook has added a new notification for articles about coronavirus
  • When users share stories about the virus, they see the date and source
  • Messages from the WHO, the CDC and other medical authorities are not flagged
  • This month, Facebook removed a message from President Trump claiming that children are “ nearly immune ” to COVID-19

The next time you start sharing a coronavirus article on Facebook, you will see the date and source of the story before posting.

The popular social media platform has just rolled out a new COVID-19 reporting feature in hopes of stopping the flow of misinformation about the virus.

John Hegeman, Vice President of Feed and Stories at Facebook, wrote in a blog post, “ We want to make sure people have the context they need to make informed decisions about what to share on Facebook, especially when it comes to COVID-19 content. . ‘

The notification is designed to help people understand the timeliness and reliability of the content before sharing it, and will also direct users to Facebook’s COVID-19 Information Center.

A new notification feature on Facebook tells users the source and date of any coronavirus articles before sharing them. The goal is to help people understand the timeliness and reliability of the content before sharing it, said John Hegeman, vice president of Feed and Stories at Facebook.

A new notification feature on Facebook tells users the source and date of any coronavirus articles before sharing them. The goal is to help people understand the timeliness and reliability of the content before sharing it, said John Hegeman, vice president of Feed and Stories at Facebook.

However, messages from recognized medical authorities such as the World Health Organization are not marked with the notification.

In 2018, Facebook added a context button to provide additional information about articles in its news feed.

And last year, the company introduced a notification to flag items that were more than 90 days old.

“News publishers in particular have expressed concern that older stories are shared on social media as current news, which could misinterpret the state of affairs of current events,” said Hegeman.

Facebook has been criticized in the past for allowing false information about the coronavirus to spread. Beginning in January, it began removing messages making false claims “about cures, treatments, the availability of essential services, or the location and severity of the outbreak.” This month, a video posted by President Trump claiming that children were ‘nearly immune’ was removed

While a prompt appears when a user tries to reshare an older story, they can still do so if they deem it relevant.

Facebook has been criticized in the past for spreading coronavirus conspiracy theories, hoaxes and fraud online.

Earlier this month, it removed a video posted on President Donald Trump’s personal page claiming that children were ‘nearly immune’ to COVID-19.

In the video, an interview Trump gave to Fox News, the president said “[Children] have a much stronger immune system than [adults]. ‘

Facebook had fact-checked previous posts from Trump, but this was the first time a post had been completely deleted. A spokesperson said the post violated the platform’s policy on “ harmful COVID misinformation. ”

Although Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg claims the site should not be the “ arbitrator of the truth, ” the company began cracking down on disinformation about COVID-19 in January.

Messages will be removed if they make false claims “about cures, treatments, availability of essential services or the location and severity of the outbreak,” the company said.

The social media giant has removed messages claiming that physical distance does not help prevent the spread of the virus and banned ads implying that a product is guaranteed to prevent or cure COVID-19.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (pictured) announced in June that the platform would remove messages encouraging voter violence or oppression. This week, the company announced a blanket ban on blackface and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (pictured) announced in June that the platform would remove messages encouraging voter violence or oppression. This week, the company announced a blanket ban on blackface and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (pictured) announced in June that the platform would remove messages encouraging voter violence or oppression. This week, the company announced a blanket ban on blackface and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

In March, when the pandemic was first declared, Facebook launched its COVID-19 information center, with real-time updates from national and global health authorities such as WHO and the CDC.

The company also announced that it would provide free advertising space for WHO and other trustworthy agencies to share vital information.

Facebook has also stepped up efforts to censor other types of content.

In June, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the platform would remove messages encouraging voter violence or oppression and put labels on messages that violate hate speech or other policies.

This week, the company announced a blanket ban on blackface and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

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