Facebook says its & # 39; oversight board & # 39; include external experts to help make decisions

Facebook says its & # 39; oversight board & # 39; use external experts to consider substantive calls as it reveals details about the plan to ensure that the review process carries out & # 39; independent judgment & # 39;

  • The company has asked for feedback from people during workshops in 88 countries
  • Participants in workshops agreed Facebook employees may not sit on the board
  • Some suggested that the board would have the power to influence the content policy of the site
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Facebook has released the findings of thousands of consultations with external experts who weighed the substantive assessment process while the company is working on building an & # 39; external supervisor & # 39; amid increasing public control.

Over the past six months, the social media giant has asked for feedback from more than 650 people in workshops in 88 countries about the design plan for the board.

According to Facebook, this committee will ultimately function as an independent court of appeal for content decisions.

Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said that decisions about acceptable speech on Facebook's suite of social networks – used by around 2.4 billion people worldwide – should not be in the hands of the company alone.

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The company will finalize the charter of the board in August, it said.

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Facebook has released the findings of thousands of consultations with external experts who weigh up the content assessment process while the company is working on building an & # 39; external supervisory board & # 39; amid increasing public control

Facebook has released the findings of thousands of consultations with external experts who weigh up the content assessment process while the company is working on building an & # 39; external supervisory board & # 39; amid increasing public control

According to the report, the participants in the workshops generally agreed that Facebook employees should not sit on the board.

The company should not be able to remove members for no reason and should clarify how the & # 39; cause & # 39; would define, they said.

In a blog post published Thursday morning, Facebook said that people want a sign that judges independently – not judging influenced by Facebook management, governments, or third parties.

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& # 39; The board needs a firm foundation for its decision-making & # 39 ;, the company added, including & # 39; a number of higher-order principles – based on freedom of expression and international human rights law – to which it can refer when setting priorities such as security and voice, privacy and equality. & # 39;

Other popular proposals were that the board should be able to choose its own affairs; that decisions by the administration must set a precedent for future cases; and that the board must have the power to influence Facebook's content policies.

Participants expressed concern about the independence of the board, both from the government actors and from the company itself.

But Facebook says it will take public consultation suggestions with executive search companies to ensure a fair selection process.

& # 39; We want to be sure that we are launching a broad network, not just looking at experts who may already be familiar with us, & # 39; said Facebook.

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& # 39; Facebook selects the first few people and those members then help select the remaining people. & # 39;

Facebook has long been criticized for not doing enough to incite hatred, violence, bullying, and other content that violates & # 39; community standards & # 39; to block.

It has stepped up the enforcement of those standards in the past year by hiring more than 30,000 people to check the content and focus on improving & # 39; safety and security & # 39; on the platforms, many of them with low-paid contractors.

But the company is still struggling with controversial controversies over content posted on its site, such as the live streaming of a shooting in which two people died in March at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

HOW IS FACEBOOK PLAN TO IMPROVE PRIVACY?

In a blog on March 6, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promised to rebuild based on six & # 39; privacy-focused & # 39; principles:

  • Private interactions
  • Encryption
  • Reduction of sustainability
  • Safety
  • interoperability
  • Secure data storage
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Zuckerberg promised end-to-end encryption for all its messaging services, which are combined in such a way that users can communicate via WhatsApp, Instagram Direct and Facebook Messenger.

He calls this & # 39; interoperability & # 39 ;.

He also said ahead, the company will not hold messages or stories for & # 39; longer than necessary & # 39; or & # 39; longer than people want them & # 39 ;.

This could, for example, mean that users set messages to be automatically deleted after a month or even a few minutes.

& # 39; Interoperability & # 39; ensures that messages remain encrypted, even when they jump from one messaging service, such as WhatsApp, to another, such as Instagram, Zuckerberg says.

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Facebook also hopes to improve users' confidence in storing their data.

Zuckerberg promised that the site does not store sensitive data in countries with a weak human rights reputation, such as privacy and freedom of expression to protect data against unauthorized use.

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