Facebook launches a digital literacy library to help teens use the Internet responsibly

Facebook has launched a new tool to help teens use the Internet responsibly. Your digital literacy library is full of free lessons and videos on topics such as privacy, online safety and building healthy relationships online (pictured)

Facebook has launched a new tool to help teens use the Internet responsibly.

Your new & # 39; Digital Literacy Library & # 39; It is full of free lessons and videos on topics such as privacy, Internet safety and building healthy relationships online.

The company said the resource was designed to help young people develop the skills they need to safely enjoy digital technology.

Controversially, Facebook did not include any lessons on false news with the tool.

The issue has become a problem for Facebook after the social network was used to spread Russian propaganda disguised as impartial media reports during the 2016 presidential election in the United States.

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Facebook has launched a new tool to help teens use the Internet responsibly. Your digital literacy library is full of free lessons and videos on topics such as privacy, online safety and building healthy relationships online (pictured)

Facebook has launched a new tool to help teens use the Internet responsibly. Your digital literacy library is full of free lessons and videos on topics such as privacy, online safety and building healthy relationships online (pictured)

"There are 830 million young people around the world, and this library is a resource for educators seeking to address digital literacy," Facebook said in a statement.

The lessons included in the tool are designed to help teens avoid addiction to social networks, cyberbullying and risk their personal data through the use of insecure applications.

The curriculum offers advice on how to protect your "online reputation," which means not posting comments or photographs that could have real-world consequences.

The company built the tool together with the Youth and Media team at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.

It was designed as a resource for teachers and parents who want to teach children between 12 and 18 years old how to act mature online.

The tool was designed to be used at home, in the classroom or for extracurricular programs, and all lessons can be downloaded for free.

The company said the resource was designed to help young people develop the skills they need to safely enjoy digital technology. The image is part of a lesson about understanding "different perspectives" when using the Internet

The company said the resource was designed to help young people develop the skills they need to safely enjoy digital technology. The image is part of a lesson about understanding "different perspectives" when using the Internet

The company said the resource was designed to help young people develop the skills they need to safely enjoy digital technology. The image is part of a lesson about understanding "different perspectives" when using the Internet

There are currently 18 lessons available in English, with plans to add another 45 languages ​​at a later date, Facebook said.

The curriculum, which was "built in consultation with adolescents," is divided into five themes.

These include: Privacy and Reputation, Identity Exploration, Positive Behavior, Security and Commitment to the Community.

The courses are available at the Facebook Security Center and the Berkman Klein Digital Literacy Resource Platform.

Controversially, Facebook did not include any lessons on false news with the tool. CEO Mark Zuckerberg (file photo) has said previously that the company is cracking down on false news reports spread through its application and website

Controversially, Facebook did not include any lessons on false news with the tool. CEO Mark Zuckerberg (file photo) has said previously that the company is cracking down on false news reports spread through its application and website

Controversially, Facebook did not include any lessons on false news with the tool. CEO Mark Zuckerberg (file photo) has said previously that the company is cracking down on false news reports spread through its application and website

Some have pointed out that the social network did not include a section to address false news in its new tool, despite the company's murky past with practice.

Facebook received strong criticism after the investigation discovered that its platform was used to propagate Russian propaganda during the 2016 presidential elections in the United States.

The false viral news reports were posted on the site in an attempt to influence the votes of American citizens.

Facebook announced on Tuesday that it identified a campaign of political influence coordinated through dozens of non-authentic accounts on its platform before the November legislative elections in the United States.

WHAT HAS FACEBOOK DONE TO CONFRONT FALSE NEWS?

In 2016, after the November 2016 election results in the United States, Mark Zuckerberg said: "Of all the content on Facebook, more than 99% of what people see is authentic."

He also warned that the company should not rush to verify the facts.

But Zuckerberg was soon criticized after false news emerged that had helped to influence the election results.

In response, the company launched a system of marked & # 39; Disputed & # 39; that he announced in a December 2016 publication.

The system meant that users were responsible for marking items that they believed were false, instead of the company.

In April 2017, Facebook suggested that the system had been a success.

He said that "in general, false news decreased on Facebook", but did not provide any evidence.

"It is difficult for us to measure because we can not read everything that is published," he said.

But it soon emerged that Facebook was not providing the full story.

In July 2017, Oxford researchers discovered that "computer propaganda is one of the most powerful tools against democracy", and Facebook was playing an important role in spreading false news.

In response, Facebook said it would prohibit pages that post cheating stories from advertising in August 2017.

In September, Facebook finally admitted during the interrogation of Congress that a Russian propaganda factory had placed ads on Facebook to influence voters around the 2016 campaign.

In December 2017, Facebook admitted that its fake news tagging system was a failure.

Since then, he has used third-party data inspectors to identify frauds, and then he gave less importance to such stories in Facebook News Feed when people share links to them.

In January, Zuckerberg said that Facebook would prioritize the news & # 39; reliable & # 39; by using member surveys to identify high quality outlets.

Facebook has quietly begun to take "fact-check" photos and videos to reduce false news. However, the details of how he is doing it are not clear.

He revealed that he suspended 32 accounts because they were involved in a non-authentic coordinated behavior.

The social network published a small number of examples of publications that included anti-Trump material and racially-charged publications, as well as a feminist publication.

But the social network did not say if they were representative of the production of the accounts as a whole and added: "We are not characterizing the general nature of the content at this point."

Democratic politicians claimed that it was the work of the Kremlin and demanded more action to prevent further interference.

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