Advertisements
Older adults who visit the social media site are 63 percent less likely to suffer from psychological problems compared to those who don't use the sites, a study claims. This is because they use it to maintain relationships and look up information that might help them
Advertisements

Adults over the age of 30 who use social media are 63 percent less likely to suffer from psychological issues such as anxiety or depression than those who don't, a study claims.

Researchers suggest that the use of sites such as Facebook can actually improve your mental health by maintaining relationships, such as those with distant relatives.

The study also says that it may be easier for people to have the platform to look up health information if they feel psychological problems.

Those who used Facebook were 1.63 times more likely to avoid psychological problems than those who were not, they thought.

Advertisements

Scroll down for video

Older adults who visit the social media site are 63 percent less likely to suffer from psychological problems compared to those who don't use the sites, a study claims. This is because they use it to maintain relationships and look up information that might help them

Older adults who visit the social media site are 63 percent less likely to suffer from psychological problems compared to those who don't use the sites, a study claims. This is because they use it to maintain relationships and look up information that might help them

HOW CAN FACEBOOK IMPROVE MENTAL HEALTH WITH THIS STUDY?

A study by Michigan State University found that someone using social media is 1.63 times more likely to avoid serious psychological problems than those who don't.

The extent to which it influences the state of mind of a person depends on how the technology is used.

Advertisements

Adults can use social media, it claims, to reconnect with distant relatives and this in turn improves their mental well-being.

It has also found that changes in the mental health of a family member affect the suffering that other family members experience.

However, this is only the case if both family members are connected on a social networking site.

Until now, adults as an individual group have not been the focus of much research into the influence of social media on their mental health.

Advertisements

There have been many studies that have repeatedly found that Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites can harm the emotional well-being of some users, especially younger people.

But this study questions whether the harmful effects that are often attributed to social media can in fact be explained by major changes in life, rather than by technology use.

Keith Hampton, professor of media and information at Michigan State University, who led the study, says that saying that an entire generation is at risk through the use of social media ignores the repercussions of major events that took place in the lives of millenials and their mental Health.

& # 39; Until now, adults have not been the focus of much research in this area & he said.

& # 39; A snapshot of the anxiety that young people feel today and the decision that an entire generation is at risk due to social media ignores more notable social changes, such as the continuing effects of the Great Recession, the increase in the number of single families, older and more protective parents, more children going to study and rising student debt. & # 39;

Advertisements

The team started looking for more adult populations and studied data from 13,000 people aged 30 and over.

The data contains information about their use of social media and their previous history of mental health care.

The key to better mental health on social media, according to the study, lies in the way it is used.

Participants who benefited most from using sites such as Facebook were those who kept in regular contact with friends and relatives.

The study also suggested that changes in the mental health of family members affect the psychological problems of other families, but only if both family members are connected on a social networking site.

Advertisements

& # 39; Today we have these constant little bits of information popping up on our cell phones and Facebook feeds, and that constant contact can be important for things like mental health, & # 39; said Professor Hampton.

He said that people had the same problems based on the data they used, whether they were on Facebook or not.

Until now, adults were not the focus of much research on this subject, but focused on its effects on teenagers and students. But the study wonders if the effects can be explained by major life stages and changes, such as going to school, instead of using technology

Until now, adults were not the focus of much research on this subject, but focused on its effects on teenagers and students. But the study wonders if the effects can be explained by major life stages and changes, such as going to school, instead of using technology

Until now, adults were not the focus of much research on this subject, but focused on its effects on teenagers and students. But the study wonders if the effects can be explained by major life stages and changes, such as going to school, instead of using technology

Critics have said that Facebook can be bad for users' mental health and can increase feelings of anxiety and depression.

Advertisements

A former Facebook manager hit the company on the head and said: & # 39; The short-term dopamine-powered feedback loops we've created are destroying the way society works. & # 39;

Facebook acknowledged in 2017 that the use of social media can be bad for users' mental health, a sign that the company felt the pressure of a growing chorus of critics.

In the blog post of Facebook's research director, David Ginsberg and their research scientist Moira Burke argued that the use of Facebook can also have positive effects on mental health.

Ginsberg and Burke claimed that & # 39; active contact with people – especially sharing messages, messages and comments with close friends and recalling past interactions – is related to improvements in well-being & # 39 ;.

The study of the MSU was published in the Journal of Computer-mediated communication.

HOW CAN YOU DELIVER ONLINE LESS TIME?

Advertisements

All the time & # 39; to & # 39; Being can have a serious effect on our mind and body. That is why a world-famous personal trainer and health writer have shared his tips on how to do a digital detox.

The Adelaide-born PT, James Duigan, 42, is Elle Macpherson's former personal trainer and his words are often treated as a gospel because he has also collaborated with Emilia Clarke, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, and Lara Stone.

Although many of us communicate with people online and visit social media, Duigan believes that we have never been lonely:

& # 39; The primary culprit is social media and our mobile phones. They can bring global communities together and provide an unceasing source of inspiration at their best, "he said.

& # 39; But in the worst case, they can be a constant nuisance, a constant distraction, and stop living in the present.

Advertisements

& # 39; Even a fast scroll before bedtime can do you & # 39; keep awake at night or plunge your self-esteem if you are cheated by Insta vagrants and impossible abdominal muscles. & # 39;

Duigan explained that social media platforms were purposefully built to be addictive, since every report is the & # 39; happy hormone & # 39; .

In a blog on his website Bodyism, James revealed what his top three tips for a digital detox are.

As with any cold turkey experience, it can be difficult to wean yourself from social media – but the trick is to replace the addiction with something else.

& # 39; Use an app called Freedom to block your Instagram, Facebook and Twitter apps for as long as you need – or can tolerate, & # 39; Mr. Duigan suggested.

Advertisements

With the app you can choose how long you want to block certain apps, which means that you can slowly persuade yourself to block them for longer.

His second step is simple: just log out.

& # 39; By that extra step between you and your & # 39; feed & # 39; you can defend the temptation to scroll when you decide to shrink, & # 39; he said.

Mr. Duigan's third and final step is to be present in the moment and ensure that you are attuned to what is happening around you.

& # 39; No photos & # 39; s. No selfies. No boomerangs. No snap chats. At least for a day. Do not lose the moment by trying to catch it, & he said.

Advertisements

& # 39; Live in the moment and it will live long in memory. & # 39;

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail