Facebook data scientist left after Zuckerberg closed the flexibility request for working mothers

Eliza Khuner was five months pregnant when she started in Mark Zuckerberg social networking empire in November 2017, but they separated in July 2018.

A Facebook data scientist revealed that he left the social networking giant just eight months after the company rejected his additional unpaid maternity leave to bond with his son.

Eliza Khuner was five months pregnant when she started in social media empire Mark Zuckerberg in November 2017, but they finally broke up in July 2018 when she felt the work would interfere with her ability to be a present mother, she wrote in an opinion piece of Wired.

The mother of Berkeley, California had raised two children before giving birth to their little girl in March.

Eliza Khuner was five months pregnant when she started in Mark Zuckerberg social networking empire in November 2017, but they separated in July 2018.

Eliza Khuner was five months pregnant when she started in Mark Zuckerberg social networking empire in November 2017, but they separated in July 2018.

Khuner raised two other children before joining Facebook in November 2017 and suffered a breakup before leaving Facebook.

Khuner raised two other children before joining Facebook in November 2017 and suffered a breakup before leaving Facebook.

Khuner raised two other children before joining Facebook in November 2017 and suffered a breakup before leaving Facebook.

Khuner's third son was born in March, but had trouble finding the time to link up with the work of his data scientist on Facebook.

Khuner's third son was born in March, but had trouble finding the time to link up with the work of his data scientist on Facebook.

Khuner's third son was born in March, but had trouble finding the time to link up with the work of his data scientist on Facebook.

However, after four months of maternity leave, Khuner admitted that she felt she was going to betray her daughter by leaving her with a babysitter all day.

It is considered a generous amount for a US company, which is not obligated to pay new mothers during their free time and, generally, only allows up to 12 weeks of absence from the office.

But with four months at home – the minimum term in the European Union companies – he also had problems with the idea of ​​sleeping only six hours if juggling a full-time job and the obligations of the newborn baby became his reality .

"When I told Facebook that I wanted to work from home part-time, HR was firm: you can not work from home, you can not work part-time, and you can not take extra unpaid leave," he wrote. in the article, adding that the issues were aggravated due to the recent breakdown of their relationship.

After sharing why he decided to quit an internal group for Facebook employees around the world, he did not expect to receive more than 5,500 responses from women and men who felt they had also had problems with parent decisions as a result of his demanding roles. in the company.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said employees would have to wait for a change in the way they address the balance between family and work, but give new parents $ 4,000

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said employees would have to wait for a change in the way they address the balance between family and work, but give new parents $ 4,000

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said employees would have to wait for a change in the way they address the balance between family and work, but give new parents $ 4,000

Childcare expenses are partially reimbursed on Facebook, and there are many breastfeeding rooms for breastfeeding mothers (Zuckerberg is photographed with his wife Priscilla and two children)

Childcare expenses are partially reimbursed on Facebook, and there are many breastfeeding rooms for breastfeeding mothers (Zuckerberg is photographed with his wife Priscilla and two children)

Childcare expenses are partially reimbursed on Facebook, and there are many breastfeeding rooms for breastfeeding mothers (Zuckerberg is photographed with his wife Priscilla and two children)

Some women admitted that they had frozen their eggs because, although they longed to be a mother, they could not afford to give up their work to care for a child.

Khuner said that even Sheryl Sandberg, director of Facebook operations and first female board member, said allowing new mothers to work part-time would place an undue burden on the rest of the team.

Sandberg became a single mother of two children after her husband Dave Goldberg died in 2015.

Known as a women's rights advocate, Goldberg said it was one of the inspirations behind Sandberg writing his book Lean In, which has served as a guide for many women on why it is so important to speak in the workplace .

When Khuner had the opportunity to confront CEO Zuckerberg during a weekly question and answer session, even holding his sleeping baby on his chest while pressing him to change the structure did not help, he wrote.

Khuner remembered how she told him to take his own advice and be brave when referring to "What would you do if you were not afraid?" posters around the Facebook campus.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook executive director and first female board member, said allowing new mothers to work part-time would place an undue burden on the rest of the team.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook executive director and first female board member, said allowing new mothers to work part-time would place an undue burden on the rest of the team.

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook executive director and first female board member, said allowing new mothers to work part-time would place an undue burden on the rest of the team.

Khuner wrote that she told him: "I want to know: would you give us extended vacation options, work from home and extended holidays now and not later? Would you direct this company and the United States to support the working parents?" Would you give the opportunity to show you how cool and loyal we can be with fewer hours on the desk, if you were not afraid? "

Zuckerberg said employees would have to wait for a change in the way they address the balance between family and work, but Khuner mentioned that Facebook supports parents in other ways.

A $ 4,000 booklet goes for new moms and dads, child care expenses are partially reimbursed, and there are many breastfeeding rooms for breastfeeding mothers.

But it is not a substitute for precious time spent with children, he concluded.

In fact, Khuner believes that flexibility will lead companies like Facebook to save money in the long run by retaining staff and having employees willing to put more into the jobs that are being returned to them.

There could even be a possibility that she will return in the future.

He finished the article: "I told Facebook when they make that change, they know where to find me."

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