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Security experts have said that the Russian owners of FaceApp do not have access to your camera role, but save the image that you have changed & # 39; With the app, people can submit a photo and use artificial intelligence to transform their faces to look older or younger

Security experts have said that the Russian owners of FaceApp do not have access to your camera role, but the image that you have modified & # 39; save & # 39 ;.

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Cyber ​​experts Checkpoint and several other investigation teams have checked the app and said they could not find any evidence that user data was stolen.

FaceApp also took care of privacy concerns and said the main reason why they save the uploaded photo in the cloud is for & # 39; performance and traffic & # 39 ;.

In the statement, they said that while the & # 39; core R&D team & # 39; of the app is in Russia, the user data is not being transferred to Russia & # 39 ;.

Their explanation comes after security fears were increased after a number of experts had warned that it could gain access to images from your gallery and save and use them without permission.

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Security experts have said that the Russian owners of FaceApp do not have access to your camera role, but save the image that you have changed & # 39; With the app, people can submit a photo and use artificial intelligence to transform their faces to look older or younger

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Security experts have said that the Russian owners of FaceApp do not have access to your camera role, but save the image that you have changed & # 39; With the app, people can submit a photo and use artificial intelligence to transform their faces to look older or younger

WHAT HAS FACEAPP SAID IN RESPONSE TO SAFETY CARE?

FaceApp CEO Yaroslav Goncharov said it does not sell or share user data with third parties.

& # 39; FaceApp handles most of the photo processing in the cloud & # 39 ;, he said. & # 39; We only upload a photo that a user has selected for editing.

& # 39; We never move other images from the phone to the cloud. & # 39; We can save an uploaded photo in the cloud.

& # 39; The main reason for this is performance and traffic: we want to ensure that the user does not repeatedly upload the photo for each editing operation.

& # 39; Most images are deleted from our servers within 48 hours of the upload date. & # 39;

A spokesperson for Checkpoint, a cyber security research agency, said to Mail Online: "Having released the new aging function, the app has become hugely popular on social media, but people are concerned about how that data is being used .

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This calls on security companies to look for vulnerabilities in the app.

& # 39; We have found nothing special. The app appears to have been developed in a responsible manner. It does not use any data in an unexpected way.

& # 39; It does not seem to have access to the user's camera roles, but only the photo that they have modified.

He said it seems that the fact that it originated in Russia is at the root of the concerns.

& # 39; People worry about apps from different parts of the world.

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& # 39; Some industry observers have raised this as a problem. But it doesn't harm their data. & # 39;

He said the researchers, rightly, advise users to be careful and rightly worry.

Twitter users pointed out yesterday that the terms of service say that the company has the ability to use photos in virtually any way, without giving anything back to the users they first made.

James Whatley, a digitas strategist. VK, posted an excerpt on his Twitter page.

The oldest & # 39; celebrity & # 39; to go in the app, Donald Trump got even more wrinkles from FaceApp

The oldest & # 39; celebrity & # 39; to go in the app, Donald Trump got even more wrinkles from FaceApp

The oldest & # 39; celebrity & # 39; to go in the app, Donald Trump got even more wrinkles from FaceApp
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The oldest & # 39; celebrity & # 39; to go in the app, Donald Trump got even more wrinkles from FaceApp

With the app, people can submit a photo and use artificial intelligence to transform their faces to look older or younger and change the color of their functions. Investigation teams checked the app and said they couldn't find any evidence that it was stealing user data.

It is: & # 39; You grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable … royalty-free license to use, modify, publish, distribute your user content … in all media formats … when you post or otherwise share. & # 39;

FaceApp may use your name, username & # 39; or any similarity & # 39; use in any media file without compensation and you cannot delete or complain about it.

The spokesperson said: & # 39; Like all other apps for sharing photos, FaceApp is clear in their privacy statement, they are not insincere. & # 39;

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The potential for hackers to steal these images was also emphasized.

He said: & # 39; Hackers are a legitimate concern, but it's a concern for all photo sharing apps. We've all posted photos, which photos can be captured on the screen. Healthcare has less to do with this app

& # 39; The more we use this type of app, the greater the risk. & # 39;

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI. James Whatley, a digitas strategist. VK tweeted an excerpt from the FaceApp Terms of Service

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI. James Whatley, a digitas strategist. VK tweeted an excerpt from the FaceApp Terms of Service

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI. James Whatley, a digitas strategist. VK tweeted an excerpt from the FaceApp Terms of Service

Still smoking! No surprise here, but the timeless Paul Rudd still looks incredibly attractive with lots of wrinkles

Still smoking! No surprise here, but the timeless Paul Rudd still looks incredibly attractive with lots of wrinkles

Still smoking! No surprise here, but the timeless Paul Rudd still looks incredibly attractive with lots of wrinkles

Still smoking! No surprise here, but the timeless Paul Rudd still looks incredibly attractive with lots of wrinkles

Experts in cyber security have said they have found nothing special. The app appears to have been developed in a responsible manner. It does not use any data in an unexpected way

Joshua Nozzi, a software developer, threw away the worries, warned people to be careful with FaceApp, and worries escalated further when Twitter users pointed out that it was run by a Russian company.

In the statement, FaceApp said that while the & & # 39; core R&D team of the app is in Russia, the user data is not transferred to Russia & # 39 ;.

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But it seems that their explanation was not enough to convince British and American data surveillance dogs, who are now thinking & # 39; about honored about FaceApp about potential privacy fears.

The Information Commissioner & # 39; s Office (ICO) did not say if it was investigating the app, but warned people to be wary about the details they share when downloading an app.

& # 39; We are aware of stories about concerns about FaceApp and will think about it & # 39 ;, said a spokeswoman.

& # 39; We encourage people to sign up for an app to see what happens to their personal information and not to provide personal information until they are clear about how they will be used. & # 39;

One of the concerns raised by users on social media was how FaceApp can use photos taken on the service, although others have noted that some of these conditions are no different from those on many other platforms.

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The American lawyer Elizabeth Potts Weinstein described it as a license to use your photos, your name, your username, and your likeness for any purpose, including commercial purposes.

Meanwhile, US Senator Chuck Schumer has called on the FBI to investigate FaceApp because of the fear of & # 39; national security and privacy risk & # 39; s & # 39 ;.

FaceApp may use your name, username & # 39; or similarity & # 39; use in any media format without compensation and you have no option to record or complain about it, the claim reports. Celebrities place selfies from a brand new old filter on FaceApp. Rochelle Humes (photo)

FaceApp may use your name, username & # 39; or similarity & # 39; use in any media format without compensation and you have no option to record or complain about it, the claim reports. Celebrities place selfies from a brand new old filter on FaceApp. Rochelle Humes (photo)

FaceApp may use your name, username & # 39; or similarity & # 39; use in any media format without compensation and you have no option to record or complain about it, the claim reports. Celebrities place selfies from a brand new old filter on FaceApp. Rochelle Humes (photo)

Gezien In view of the growing popularity of FaceApp and these national security and privacy issues, I ask the FBI to assess whether the personal data uploaded to FaceApp by millions of Americans may end up in the hands of the Russian government or entities with ties. lie to the Russian government, & he said in a letter.

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FaceApp is currently one of the most downloaded apps for both iOS and Android, because the # faceappchallenge messages have taken over social media.

But with the increase in popularity, some have raised questions about how secure our user data is and what it does with users' photos.

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI.

WHAT IS FACEAPP AND WHAT DOES IT DO?

FaceApp is a photo-morphing app that uses artificial intelligence and neural facial transformations to change faces.

The trend has become viral because of the "#faceappchallenge", which encourages people to load their photos into the app and make them older.

Many celebrities have participated in the challenge, including the Jonas Brothers, Gordon Ramsay and Rochelle Humes.

Fine wine: Drake plugs his own image into the app to get this result

Fine wine: Drake plugs his own image into the app to get this result

Fine wine: Drake plugs his own image into the app to get this result

With the app, people can submit a photo and use artificial intelligence to transform their faces to look older or younger and change the color of their functions.

FaceApp is a photo-morphing app that uses artificial intelligence and neural facial transformations to change faces.

The app can use photos from your library or you can take a photo in the app.

The free service uses artificial intelligence to edit an image in your phone gallery and transforms the image into someone who doubles or triples your age.

It can also change your hair color, show you how you look with a beard and even look younger.

Take a bow: it is not surprising that Rihanna still looks great like an old lady

Take a bow: it is not surprising that Rihanna still looks great like an old lady

Take a bow: it is not surprising that Rihanna still looks great like an old lady

Take a bow: it is not surprising that Rihanna still looks great like an old lady

Take a bow: it is not surprising that Rihanna still looks great like an old lady

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI. Here Gordon Ramsay posted this funny photo on his Twitter

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI. Here Gordon Ramsay posted this funny photo on his Twitter

The app's terms and conditions essentially give FaceApp access to using, modifying, modifying, and publishing all images that you offer in exchange for the AI. Here Gordon Ramsay posted this funny photo on his Twitter

Celebrities place selfies from a brand new old filter on FaceApp. Rochelle Humes (photo) poses her resemblance to Instagram

Celebrities place selfies from a brand new old filter on FaceApp. Rochelle Humes (photo) poses her resemblance to Instagram

Celebrities place selfies from a brand new old filter on FaceApp. Rochelle Humes (photo) poses her resemblance to Instagram

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