Face of equality, or an encounter with bruises in reality?

Face of equality, or an encounter with bruises in reality? Woman-participant brutally beaten by a male rival in shocking SAS: Who Dares wins boxing match

  • Midwife Louise Gabbitas, 29, is one of the first women to appear on the C4 show
  • She chooses to fight the 27-year-old male student Nathaniel instead of a woman
  • She is beaten in her face several times before she is bruised on the ground

Amy Oliver for The Mail on Sunday

The decision to allow women in all parts of the army was widely praised as a victory for the equality of women.

But TV viewers will probably be shocked tonight when they see a woman being hit hard by a male participant on Channel 4 & SAS: Who Dares Wins.

The incident raises questions about how suitable it is to recruit men as front-liners in addition to men.

TV viewers will be shocked to see midwife Louise Gabbitas (29), who is severely beaten by a male participant on Channel 4 & SAS: Who Dares Wins

TV viewers will be shocked to see midwife Louise Gabbitas (29), who is severely beaten by a male participant on Channel 4 & SAS: Who Dares Wins

Midwife Louise Gabbitas (29) is one of the first women to appear on the C4 show, guiding participants through SAS-like training.

She deliberately chooses the fight against the 27-year-old student Nathaniel instead of taking on another woman in the ring.

While the pair, dressed in protective headgear, is facing each other, the principal instructor of the show, the former Special Forces sniper Ant Middleton, tells them: The best form of defense is attack. Is that understood? & # 39;

Nathaniel does not hold herself and slaps Miss Gabbitas in the face several times before she puts hard strokes on her head until she falls.

The episode leaves her confused, bruises and tears and calls Middleton to tell the recruits: "It does not matter to the enemy what kind of race, race or religion you are."

During the episode Miss Gabbitas remains messy, bruised and tears behind. This is the first time that women can participate in the four-year history of the show

During the episode Miss Gabbitas remains messy, bruised and tears behind. This is the first time that women can participate in the four-year history of the show

During the episode Miss Gabbitas remains messy, bruised and tears behind. This is the first time that women can participate in the four-year history of the show

Later he told The Mail on Sunday: & # 39; In general, men are stronger than females. It does not mean better, we are just better in certain jobs and women are better at jobs than certain men. If national security and real lives are jeopardized, then that is dangerous. & # 39;

It is Nathaniel who seems to be more emotional after the boxing match.

& # 39; I tried not to become too aggressive, "he says to Miss Gabbitas. & # 39; It was the hardest thing to do.

& # 39; It is a head f ***. & # 39; Miss Gabbitas reassures him and says: & # 39; I'm not crying because you hurt me. I am doing well. & # 39;

This is the first time that women are allowed to participate in the four-year history of the show, a change motivated by the Ministry of Defense's decision to allow women to become frontline troops and even become members of the SAS.

The recruits were treated equally during their entire lives in a two-week heavy military training camp in the Andes, Chile, in the winter.

We slept together, ate together, went to the toilet together, wore the same weight and did exactly the same tasks as another, & # 39; said Miss Gabbitas. She admits that she's brute & # 39; found.

Middleton has spoken about women who have become members of the SAS in the past. He told the MoS earlier: & # 39; It's not about the [SAS] itself, but the brutal, violent and aggressive reality of war.

I believe that level – it is outside the front line, it is people who hunt people – is not a place for women. & # 39;

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