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Officials are investigating a turbine engine of the Lion Air flight 610 in Jakarta in October. The FAA found a high risk of similar emergencies after the crash, but did not land the fleet

FAA found a high emergency risk in the Boeing 737 Max fleet just days after the FIRST fatal crash

  • FAA conducted the risk analysis days after the Lion Air 610 crash in October
  • High probability found for a similar emergency situation in the 737 Max fleet within a few months
  • FAA has responded by giving pilot instructions on how to correct system errors
  • But the Ethiopian 302 crashed in March in the same emergency situation and killed 157
  • The 737 Max fleet was subsequently grounded and remains out of service for upgrades
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The Federal Aviation Administration found a high risk of a similar cockpit emergency within days of the first of two fatal Boeing 737 Max crashes, a new report has revealed.

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Just days after the October 29 crash of Lion Air 610 in the Java Sea, regulators conducted Transport Airplane Risk Assessment Methodology (TARAM) analysis that found that the risks of a similar incident were unacceptably high, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The TARAM showed that the & # 39; not that much & # 39; to cause the failure with the MCAS automated guidance system associated with the crashes, a person told the Journal about the analysis.

FAA supervisors responded by warning pilots that they could counteract a MCAS misfire by using an established emergency protocol – but stopped grounding the fleet until after the second fatal 737 Max crash of Ethiopian Air 302 in March.

Officials are investigating a turbine engine of the Lion Air flight 610 in Jakarta in October. The FAA found a high risk of similar emergencies after the crash, but did not land the fleet

Officials are investigating a turbine engine of the Lion Air flight 610 in Jakarta in October. The FAA found a high risk of similar emergencies after the crash, but did not land the fleet

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The TARAM is essentially a formula that calculates how many people are likely to die in a given period by taking into account fleet size, the number of failures and the number of passengers.

After the Lion Air crash, the TARAM determined that the risk of MCAS failures was above FAA thresholds – but the agency determined that the pilot warning, coupled with a software modification by Boeing, would be sufficient without grounding the fleet.

A Boeing spokesperson told the Journal: & Boeing and the FAA both agreed, based on the results of their respective rigorous safety processes, that the initial action to strengthen existing pilot procedures … and then the development and handling of a software update, the appropriate actions. & # 39;

He added: & # 39; The safety of everyone who flew our aircraft was of paramount importance when the analysis was performed and the actions were taken. & # 39;

The 737 Max fleet remains grounded after the second crash, as Boeing perfects the software and examines all other risk factors before recertification.

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On Thursday, two of the three major American airlines that own Max jets updated their estimates of how the aircraft is damaging their bottom lines.

On the ground, Boeing 737 MAX aircraft were parked earlier this month on an aerial photo in Boeing Field in Seattle. Boeing hopes to put the planes back into use in October

On the ground, Boeing 737 MAX aircraft were parked earlier this month on an aerial photo in Boeing Field in Seattle. Boeing hopes to put the planes back into use in October

On the ground, Boeing 737 MAX aircraft were parked earlier this month on an aerial photo in Boeing Field in Seattle. Boeing hopes to put the planes back into use in October

American Airlines said the revenue for 2019 will be reduced by $ 400 million – $ 50 million more than the previous estimate. Southwest Airlines said the earthing had shortened $ 175 million compared to the second quarter operating result.

Southwest has also announced that, because it has fewer planes without the Max, it will terminate the service at a major airport in the New York City area. And it dropped the plane from its schedule until the beginning of January – two months longer than the American – to give time for retraining of pilots and to prevent disruptions for holidaymakers.

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Airlines executives, however, stand behind the aircraft and bet that passengers will return on board.

& # 39; We believe the Max 8 is the best aircraft in its category & # 39 ;, Gary Kelly, president and CEO of Southwest, told investors. & # 39; We want as many Maxes as we can deploy practically as quickly as possible. & # 39;

Doug Parker, president and CEO of American Airlines, said that as soon as the Federal Aviation Administration approves changes to the Boeing aircraft and pilots are convinced that they are sufficiently trained to fly with it, & # 39; will make a difference in the Consumer attitudes to the aircraft itself & # 39 ;.

Last week, Boeing reported its largest quarterly loss ever, nearly $ 3 billion, after reserving $ 5.6 billion to compensate its airlines.

Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg said he expects the Max to resume service in October after the company has completed software updates in September.

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He said that Boeing may have to reduce or even pause Max production if the earthing takes much longer.

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