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Scientists studying sea ice in Antarctica warn that an increase in accumulation can cause an ice age. Computer simulations show that an explosion of sea ice would prevent the ocean from exchanging carbon dioxide with the atmosphere

Earth faces a different ICE AGE: Scientists claim that an increase in sea ice can block the release of carbon dioxide from the ocean and cause global COOLING

  • Computer simulations show that an increase in sea ice can cause an ice age
  • Works as a lid on the ocean and blocks carbon dioxide emissions
  • This would create a reverse greenhouse effect and cool the earth
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Scientists studying sea ice in Antarctica warn that an increase in accumulation may cause the next ice age.

Computer simulations show that an explosion in ice circling the frozen desert would act as a lid on the ocean and prevent carbon dioxide from exchanging with the atmosphere.

This can cause a reverse greenhouse effect, which would eventually cool the earth and bring our planet to an ice age for the first time in more than two million years.

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Scientists studying sea ice in Antarctica warn that an increase in accumulation can cause an ice age. Computer simulations show that an explosion of sea ice would prevent the ocean from exchanging carbon dioxide with the atmosphere

Scientists studying sea ice in Antarctica warn that an increase in accumulation can cause an ice age. Computer simulations show that an explosion of sea ice would prevent the ocean from exchanging carbon dioxide with the atmosphere

It is thought that the last great ice age ended about 2.5 million years ago during the Pleistocene era.

Since then, glaciers have periodically covered the earth, but then they withdrew and experts have now tried to understand the process behind an ice age – how it works and what it causes.

The latest study was conducted by a team from the University of Chicago who wanted to discover and understand the processes of the global climate.

Assistant Professor Malte Jansen at the University of Chicago (UChicago) said: & # 39; An important question in the field is still what led the earth to cycle in and out of ice ages periodically. & # 39;

& # 39; We are pretty sure that the carbon balance between the atmosphere and the ocean must have changed, but we don't quite know how or why. & # 39;

This event can cause a reverse greenhouse effect, which would eventually cool the earth and bring our planet to an ice age for the first time in more than two million years
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This event can cause a reverse greenhouse effect, which would eventually cool the earth and bring our planet to an ice age for the first time in more than two million years

This event can cause a reverse greenhouse effect, which would eventually cool the earth and bring our planet to an ice age for the first time in more than two million years

Jansen and former postdoctoral researcher UChicago Alice Marzocchi developed computer simulations of Antarctica sea ice and discovered that it not only changes ocean circulation, but also acts as a cover and blocks the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere – the less carbon in the air, the cooler the planet is becoming.

& # 39; What this suggests is that it is a feedback loop & # 39 ;, said Marzocchi, now a researcher at the UK National Oceanography Center.

& # 39; As the temperature drops, less carbon is released into the atmosphere, causing more cooling. & # 39;

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The statement is consistent with evidence about the climate in the past from sources such as sediments, coral reefs and core samples of glaciers.

& # 39; What surprised me is how much of this increased storage can only be attributed to physical changes, with Antarctic sea ice cover being the main player, & # 39; Marzocchi said.

Only the physical effects, before taking into account changes in biological growth, account for around half of the carbon dioxide uptake that is thought to have happened.

HOW MANY WILL SEA LEVELS IN THE FOLLOWING CENTURIES?

Global sea level could rise to 2300 as much as 1.2 meters (4 feet), even if we reach the 2015 Paris climate targets, scientists have warned.

The long-term change will be driven by a thaw of ice from Greenland to Antarctica, which will have to pull the coastlines again.

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Sea level rise threatens cities from Shanghai to London, to low-lying parts of Florida or Bangladesh, and to entire nations such as the Maldives.

It is vital that we reduce emissions as quickly as possible to prevent even greater increases, a team of researchers led by Germany said in a new report.

By 2300, the report predicted that sea levels would rise by 0.7 – 1.2 meters, even if nearly 200 countries fully met the targets of the 2015 Paris Agreement.

The objectives of the agreements include the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to zero in the second half of this century.

The ocean level will rise inexorably, because existing industrial gases that retain heat in the atmosphere will linger, causing more ice to melt.

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In addition, water naturally expands as it heats above four degrees Celsius (39.2 ° F).

The report also found that every five years delay after 2020 in the peak of global emissions would mean an increase in sea level by an additional 20 centimeters by 2300.

& # 39; Sea level is often communicated as a very slow process that you can't do much about … but the next 30 years really matter & # 39 ;, says lead author Dr. Matthias Mengel from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Potsdam, Germany, told Reuters.

None of the nearly 200 governments signing the Paris agreements is on track to deliver on its promises.

Although experts warn of the danger of increased sea ice, other studies this year have found that the amount in the ocean is falling.

In July, NASA announced that the ice circling around Antarctica had reached a low point – an area as large as Mexico had lost

Floating ice from the southern continent increased steadily from 1979 and reached a record high in 2014.

Three years later, the annual average size of Antarctic sea ice reached its lowest point, wiping out three and a half decades of profit, according to a NASA study of satellite data.

This means that Antarctica has lost the same amount of ice since 2014 as it has disappeared from the Arctic for more than three decades.

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