Experts warn that the hurricane season in the Atlantic is about to start with a vengeance

The hurricane season will hit the East Coast in the coming weeks after a surprisingly quiet August (Hurricane Norman formed in the Pacific on Thursday)

The hurricane season will come strongly on the east coast in the coming weeks after a surprisingly quiet August.

A storm that is forming on the Caribbean coast could affect the islands and Florida this weekend if weather conditions continue to worsen. If you progress to become a tropical storm or hurricane, it will be called Florence.

Meanwhile, meteorologists warn that "there is potential for two or three tropical features turning over the Atlantic on the second weekend of September."

"The climate models have triggered the change in hurricane season in the Atlantic and they consider that there are multiple possible development areas, starting mainly this weekend," meteorologist Ryan Maue told Tennessean.

The hurricane season will hit the East Coast in the coming weeks after a surprisingly quiet August (Hurricane Norman formed in the Pacific on Thursday)

The hurricane season will hit the East Coast in the coming weeks after a surprisingly quiet August (Hurricane Norman formed in the Pacific on Thursday)

Experts say the reason for the sudden increase in hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico is because wind shear, which can wipe out developing hurricanes, seems to be falling.

Meanwhile, the Pacific coast is preparing for hurricane Norman, which has become a Category 4 storm.

Meteorologists say Norman had maximum sustained winds of 145 mph early Thursday and could grow even stronger before starting to weaken on Friday night or Saturday.

It is currently about 600 miles southwest of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. For the time being, it is far enough from the ground that no coastal warnings or warnings are observed.

Tropical Storm Miriam also ruminated over the eastern Pacific with maximum winds of 60 mph, although it seems it may miss Hawaii, which is recovering from Hurricane Lane.

A storm that forms on the Caribbean coast could affect the islands and Florida this weekend if weather conditions continue to worsen

A storm that forms on the Caribbean coast could affect the islands and Florida this weekend if weather conditions continue to worsen

A storm that forms on the Caribbean coast could affect the islands and Florida this weekend if weather conditions continue to worsen

Lane brought historic amounts of rain that forced evacuations on some islands.

No storm-related deaths have been reported, although Big Island officials said they pulled families out of floods and landslides closed roads.

The storm began to weaken and the National Weather Service canceled all storm warnings for the state, several hours after shopkeepers in the heavy areas of Honolulu began to knock down plywood to protect the windows if the storm reached that far.

Lane approached the islands earlier this week as a Category 5 hurricane, meaning it is likely to cause catastrophic damage with winds of 157 mph or more. But higher-level winds known as shear cut the storm quickly.

When the floods hit the Big Island, the winds fanned brush fires that had broken out in the dry areas of Maui and Oahu. Some residents of a shelter in Maui had to flee from the flames and another fire forced people to leave their homes.

The hurricane season will begin on the other coast when Puerto Rico releases a new death toll from the devastating Hurricane Maria.

Meteorologists say Norman had maximum sustained winds of 145 mph early Thursday and could grow even more. Tropical Storm Miriam also ruminated over the eastern Pacific with maximum winds of 60 mph, although it seems that Hawaii could be overlooked.

Meteorologists say Norman had maximum sustained winds of 145 mph early Thursday and could grow even more. Tropical Storm Miriam also ruminated over the eastern Pacific with maximum winds of 60 mph, although it seems that Hawaii could be overlooked.

Meteorologists say Norman had maximum sustained winds of 145 mph early Thursday and could grow even more. Tropical Storm Miriam also ruminated over the eastern Pacific with maximum winds of 60 mph, although it seems that Hawaii could be overlooked.

Now 2,975 died, much more than the 64 originally reported by the government, in the six months after the devastation of the island in September 2017 and that the entire electric network was destroyed by researchers from the School of Public Health of the Milken Institute in George Washington. College.

"We never anticipated a scenario of zero communication, zero energy, zero access to the highway," Governor Ricardo Rosselló told reporters. "I think the lesson is to anticipate the worst." … Yes, I made mistakes. Yes, in retrospect, things could have been handled differently. "

He said he is creating a commission to study the response to hurricanes and a registry of people vulnerable to the next hurricane, such as the elderly, bedridden patients and kidney dialysis patients.

Rosselló acknowledged that Puerto Rico remains vulnerable to another major storm. He said the government has improved its communication systems and established a network to distribute food and medicines, but noted that there are still 60,000 homes without an adequate roof and that the electricity grid is still unstable.

"One lesson from this is that relief and recovery efforts should be focused as much as possible in low-income areas, in older people, who are more vulnerable," said Lynn Goldman, dean of the Milken Institute.

The finding on Tuesday is almost double the government's previous estimate, included in a recent report to Congress, that there were 1,427 more than normal deaths in the three months after the storm.

.