Experts say that large & # 39; poorly designed & # 39; houses in suburbs can be a financially black hole for owners

Why you own a McMansion, get out of your pocket: experts say that huge & # 39; poorly designed & # 39; houses in a suburb can be a financially black hole for owners

  • Experts warn & # 39; project home & # 39; developments are potential money mines
  • Homes that are not designed to meet their environment can result in huge energy bills
  • Western Australia has more new homes that do not meet six-star energy standards

Experts warn that project homes, also known as McMansions, can potentially be pits for new homeowners.

The concern is centered around the energy efficiency of the houses, with claims the & # 39; off the shelf & # 39; approach that they are not designed to use their location.

With high energy bills the location of the location, the orientation to the sun, the natural wind, the placement of windows, building materials and insulation can make a big difference to the wallets of homeowners.

Homes that are not designed in their unique environment can cause residents to constantly use air conditioning, lighting, heaters and fans, dramatically increasing their energy bills.

Experts warn that project homes, also known as McMansions, could potentially be pits for new homeowners

Experts warn that project homes, also known as McMansions, could potentially be pits for new homeowners

With high energy bills, sky location, orientation to the sun, natural wind, placement of windows, building materials and insulation can make a difference to homeowner's portfolios

With high energy bills, sky location, orientation to the sun, natural wind, placement of windows, building materials and insulation can make a difference to homeowner's portfolios

With high energy bills, sky location, orientation to the sun, natural wind, placement of windows, building materials and insulation can make a difference to homeowner's portfolios

In February of this year, a photo of two project house style developments that were built so close together that the gutters overlap each other caused a riot online.

The caption on the photo indicated that it was a new development on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland.

A similar photo was posted online a month earlier with two new houses whose roof gutters touched in a new building south of Brisbane.

Kate Fitzgerald, who runs an architectural office in Western Australia, said she thinks the problem arose because architects are rarely involved in the home market project.

In February of this year, a photo of two project house style developments that were built so close together that the gutters overlap each other caused a riot online

In February of this year, a photo of two project house style developments that were built so close together that the gutters overlap each other caused a riot online

In February of this year, a photo of two project house style developments that were built so close together that the gutters overlap each other caused a riot online

Mrs. Fitzgerald told ABC about her research into 50 project-home companies, of which only two were architects actively working on projects.

She believes this is the reason that Western Australia in particular has a larger number of homes that do not meet energy efficiency standards.

& # 39; At the national level, about 1.5 percent of the houses in our database are less than six stars. In Western Australia, it's somewhere like 15 percent or even 20 percent, & # 39; CSIRO research simulator, Anthony Wright, told ABC Radio.

However, the Housing Association said that all new homes must achieve six-star energy efficiency in their designs to comply with building codes.

& # 39; There is no difference in how project homes are designed to meet minimum energy efficiency standards like any other type of new home, & # 39; told policy director Kristin Brookfield to the ABC.

She explained many outcomes that could affect the energy efficiency and final operating costs of a house after it has been built and that has not been included in the plans.

& # 39; The star ratings only give a home buyer an indication of the amount of energy they use to heat and cool their home. No other electrical appliances are included in a star rating, & she said.

Architect Ben Caine said that many new homeowners have placed size above other factors in new construction.

& # 39; They want a house that is energy efficient and well-designed, but there seems to be a real ingrained institution that a large house is important for resale, & # 39; he said.

Many new homeowners placed size above other factors in new builds, according to experts

Many new homeowners placed size above other factors in new builds, according to experts

Many new homeowners placed size above other factors in new builds, according to experts

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