Categories: Health

Experts say semen-catching ‘dripstick’ that is shoved in vagina after sex can be dangerous

It is marketed as a ‘semen sponge’, designed to cleanse the vagina after sex.

But doctors are urging women not to use the device, called a ‘Dripstick’.

Experts say the product is harmful and could cause thrush, bacterial vaginosis, and irritation.

Using the device may even make women more likely to contract an STI, a doctor said.

The Awkward Essentials ‘drip wand’ (left) is marketed as a semen sponge, used to clean up drips after sex and keep sheets and pants from getting wet. The sponge was advertised in a TikTok video (right) showing its absorbency with a custard donut

The Dripstick, which first hit the market last year, costs $25 (£20) for a pack of 20 sponges.

It has gone viral once again as a result of doctors trying to encourage women not to use it.

A TikTok ad, posted by Awkward Essentials, the company that sells it, shows it being placed inside a custard-filled donut.

The clip bragged about being able to absorb semen ‘quickly’, using the example of it absorbing yellow custard.

The viral product is shaped similar to a tampon and is made of polyurethane, a plastic material adapted to a sponge.

Essentially, it’s a sponge on a stick used to clean up “dripy discomfort” after sex.

Ships with a return address to ‘Richard Cummings’.

Dr Hannah Crowther, a Berkshire GP with a special interest in women’s health, said it was a “bad idea”.

Dr Crowther told MailOnline: ‘Generally the vaginal flora should be left alone.

“We always say don’t shower and the more you wash on the inside, the more likely you are to unbalance your healthy bacteria and cause problems.”

He added: “It’s certainly concerning if people are using it for birth control.”

On the Awkward Essentials website, it is emphasized that the ‘drip stick’ is not a menstrual product, birth control, or protection against STIs/STDs.

But it is advertised as a “hygiene” product, which many doctors disagree with.

In a video on TikTok, Dr. Gemma Newman, a GP in London with a background in gynecology, begs people not to buy it and not use it.

Dr Newman said: ‘You don’t need to use this after sex.

‘If you want to wash after sex, it’s up to you, but don’t insert anything in your vagina, it’s self-cleaning and you’ll upset your microbiome.

There’s no need.

A&E doctor and TikTok comedian Dr. Maddy Lucy Dann also warned of the dangers of ‘mindless’ sponging on social media, saying it could cause ‘harm’.

After being tagged in a ‘Dripstick’ ad, Dr. Dann stressed to her followers that the inside of the vagina doesn’t need cleaning.

She said: ‘Any product that suggests you need to dry or clean your vagina after sex is bizarre. Don’t use them.

Dr. Dann criticizes the product for shaming women for just going to the bathroom after sex to get clean.

She said: “They shame and demonize completely normal behavior, creating a problem so they can sell you a solution.”

She suggests that “gravity” and just going to the bathroom after sex to clean up will do the job, adding, “Using after sex is also very important because it can cleanse the urethra and really reduce the risk of UTIs.”

However, the ‘Dripstick’ isn’t just getting hate because it’s unnecessary.

Dr. Dann also warns about health hazards.

She said: “Inserting a dry sponge into the vagina can cause micro abrasions or tears that put you at risk of irritation, BV, thrush.”

This is because the sponge could kill off healthy bacteria, disrupt the vaginal microbiome, and the natural PH of the vagina, creating the perfect breeding ground for infections like thrush and BV.

The chances of developing a yeast infection or BV are also increased when the skin is irritated or damaged, this could happen if the sponge scratches the area or dries it out.

Dr. Dann, who has more than 940,000 followers, added: “If the person you sleep with has a sexually transmitted infection and it’s present in their ejaculation, irritation and microtears from the Dripstick could make you more prone to to contract that STI from your partner.

Dr. Jennifer Gunter, a Canadian-American gynecologist, also ‘hates’ this product.

The author of The Vagina Bible suggested simply wiping down with a wipe after sex in a TikTok video last year.

Now that the product has gone viral again this week, Dr Gunter has expressed how ‘sick’ she is of the Dripstick company trying to ‘shame’ women into ‘using a product they don’t need’.

In a TikTok video, she said: “There is no data to suggest in any way that cleaning the inside of the vagina with this Dripstick product is good for the vaginal microbiome.”

Related Post

“In fact, we can say the opposite because we know that every attempt at intravaginal cleansing is associated with damage to the vaginal ecosystem.”

She added: “Listen to the experts, not the people selling products.”

In an FAQ section on the ‘Dripstick’ website, Awkward Essentials stresses that the vagina cleans itself and that the sponge “should only be used if excess semen is present.”

Awkward Essentials says: ‘It is a sponge designed to absorb liquids and does not contain additives of any kind.

“If you don’t mind dripping or have other methods that work for you, great.”

Awkward Essentials has been contacted for comment.

WHAT ELSE HAVE DOCTORS WARNED WOMEN NOT TO PUT IN THEIR VAGINAS?

Parsley

In January 2019, the women’s magazine Marie Claire made a bizarre suggestion that parsley could induce menstruation.

Women may want to get their period earlier as a way to manage their cycle before a holiday or special event.

According to the article, parsley is an emmenagogue, a substance that increases menstrual flow, which can “soften the cervix and even out hormonal imbalances.”

Doctors, including Dr. Shazia Malik, a London-based obstetrician and gynecologist, urged women never to insert vegetables into the vagina, as it could lead to health risks, including death.

Marie Clare has now apologized for the article and removed it because it is “wrong.”

Apple cider vinegar

Experts urged women not to use trendy apple cider vinegar to ‘tighten’ their vaginas in October 2017 after blogs and online forums encouraged women to carry out the bizarre technique of douching. .

Aside from vinegar being completely ineffective in tightening the vagina, Professor Linda Cardozo of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in London warns that it could disrupt the organ’s delicate “good” bacteria, putting women at risk of irritation and infection.

To maintain the strength and tone of the vagina, women should perform pelvic floor exercises regularly, recommends Professor Cardozo.

Cleaners, lubricants and wipes

Women who use intimate health products are at increased risk of bacterial, fungal, and urinary tract infections (UTIs), April 2018 research from the University of Guelph suggested.

Vaginal disinfectant gels increase women’s risk of developing a genital bacterial infection by nearly 20 times and a fungal infection, such as yeast infection, by eight times, a study found.

Intimate washes make women 3.5 times more likely to get a bacterial infection and 2.5 times more likely to get a fungal infestation, the research adds.

Vaginal wipes double the risk of a UTI, while lubricants and moisturizing creams increase women’s susceptibility to thrush by 2.5 times, the study found.

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Jade Eggs

A gynecologist has criticized Gwyneth Paltrow’s suggestion that women put jade eggs in their vaginas as ridiculous and dangerous.

Writing on her lifestyle blog, the Hollywood actress claimed that the $66 rocks increase orgasms, vaginal muscle tone, hormone balance, and “female energy.”

Women, Paltrow explained through an interview with her “beauty guru/healer/inspiration/friend,” must squeeze the egg inside them all day to exercise their pelvic floor.

But acclaimed gynecologist Dr. Jen Gunter warned in January 2019 that the whole idea is nonsense, and could even increase the risk of bacterial vaginosis, or deadly toxic shock syndrome.

vaginal scraping

Doctors warned against this procedure after 43-year-old Mel B revealed that she had the inside of her vagina scraped out and new tissue inserted after her bitter divorce from ex-husband Stephen Belafonte.

The procedure, largely unheard of until Mel B spoke out, could lead to a serious risk of infection, experts said.

Dr. Jen Gunter, an OB/GYN and author of The Vagina Bible, said refinery29 that women “never, ever scrape their vaginas,” or even douche, which cleanses the vagina with a douche and fluid.

She said: ‘Any scraping from the vaginal epithelium [tissue] it could affect the vaginal ecosystem and, in theory, could spread HPV locally and increase a woman’s vulnerability to infection.

He added that the vagina regenerates every 96 hours and the surface cells shed every four hours.

bath bombs

Doctors raised concerns in January 2019 that people would use bath bombs as a sex toy.

The comments came after popular retailer Lush launched a cheeky Valentine’s Day line that featured pumps shaped like eggplant and peach emojis.

Dr Vanessa Mackay, a spokesperson for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, told The Metro: “We strongly discourage the use of internal bath bombs as they could upset the fragile balance of good bacteria inside the vagina.”

“This natural flora helps protect the vagina, and disrupting it could lead to irritation, inflammation, and infection, such as bacterial vaginosis or yeast infection.”

Merry

Recent Posts

Trent Bowden, Lotto winner after a long battle for his health, is alleged to have $1.5million wealth from the syndicate

From fighting for his life to allegedly 'turning on his Lotto syndicate and keeping their…

7 mins ago

Three years imprisonment is now possible for cruel thugs who have abused pets.

Cruel felons who abuse pets now face three years in prison under new animal welfare…

17 mins ago

Manny Pacquiao breaks silence after referee cheats to give him victory over an Aussie boxer

World eighth division boxing champion Manny Pacquiao has finally broken his silence over the cheating…

18 mins ago

Pauline Hanson slams Indigenous Voice to Parliament, claiming it is racist

Pauline Hanson slams pressure for an Indigenous vote in parliament - claiming it will 'separate…

23 mins ago

Lionel Messi was almost an Australian Socceroo! How Argentina’s superstar could have been conceived in Australia

Lionel Messi was almost a Socceroo! The Argentine megastar could have been born in Australia…

28 mins ago

Cheeky Gen Z employees share their amusing (and brutal) out of office messages

Cheeky Gen Z employees share their funny (and brutal) out-of-office messages — but all it…

28 mins ago