Experts find that stolen credit cards on the dark web rose to 76 MILLION at the end of 2019

Security experts find that the number of stolen credit cards on the dark web rose to 76 MILLION in the second half of 2019, with 54 percent of them belonging to Americans

  • Experts found an increase in stolen credit cards for sale online at the end of 2019
  • There were more than 76 million in the last half, compared with 23 million in the first
  • The team also discovered that 64 percent of the cards belonged to Americans
  • This is because they have more wealth and multiple credit cards.

The number of stolen credit cards for sale on the dark web saw a massive increase in the second half of 2019, it has emerged.

Security experts reported that more than 76 million compromised cards were available for purchase in the last six months of the year, three times more than what appeared in the first half.

The team also discovered that 64 percent of them were linked to US accounts and more than 54 percent were Visa credit cards.

The report suggests that because Americans have multiple cards and more wealth, they are more attractive targets for digital thieves.

Banks and card issuers in the United States were also late to adopt EMV technology, which was implemented around the world years before, has also made US citizens more vulnerable.

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Security experts reported that more than 76 million compromised cards were available for purchase in the last six months of the year, three times more than what appeared in the first half. The team also discovered that 64 percent of them were linked to US accounts and more than 54 percent were Visa credit cards.

Security experts reported that more than 76 million compromised cards were available for purchase in the last six months of the year, three times more than what appeared in the first half. The team also discovered that 64 percent of them were linked to US accounts and more than 54 percent were Visa credit cards.

The data was discovered by Sixgill, a cybersecurity intelligence startup, who wrote: ‘This report analyzed different trends related to clandestine financial fraud in H2 – 2019, focusing on the 76,230,127 compromised cards offered for sale in illegal credit card markets monitored by Sixgill in the deep and dark web. ‘

“Compared to the 23,319,701 cards observed for sale in the first half of 2019, the 3.25X increase underscores the upward trend of cards offered for sale in the underground.”

The team discovered that cards originating in the United States had a much higher rate than any other country.

‘Of the 76,230,127 cards that were in circulation in the deep and dark network during H2-2019, 49,190,022 belonged to United States accounts (64.5 percent).

Sixgill discovered that four of the main payment networks were among the 76 million: Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover. Visa had 54 percent of the market, followed by Mastercard with 34 percent and American Express and Discover were far behind: they had seven percent and two percent

Sixgill discovered that four of the main payment networks were among the 76 million: Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover. Visa had 54 percent of the market, followed by Mastercard with 34 percent and American Express and Discover were far behind: they had seven percent and two percent

Sixgill discovered that four of the main payment networks were among the 76 million: Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover. Visa had 54 percent of the market, followed by Mastercard with 34 percent and American Express and Discover were far behind: they had seven percent and two percent

“There are several possible explanations for this.”

The team explained that the US payment issuers. UU. They offer benefits to customers, such as points or money back, which makes many Americans have more than one credit card.

And they have higher incomes compared to the rest of the world, which makes them attractive goals.

‘US banks and other issuers of payments with US card. UU. Belatedly adopted EMV technology, which is used in Europe and other parts of the world, the reports also point to a reason why most of the compromised cards belong to Americans.

The report suggests that because Americans have multiple cards and more wealth, they are more attractive targets for digital thieves. Banks and card issuers in the United States were also late to adopt EMV technology, which was implemented worldwide years before, has also made US citizens more vulnerable

The report suggests that because Americans have multiple cards and more wealth, they are more attractive targets for digital thieves. Banks and card issuers in the United States were also late to adopt EMV technology, which was implemented worldwide years before, has also made US citizens more vulnerable

The report suggests that because Americans have multiple cards and more wealth, they are more attractive targets for digital thieves. Banks and card issuers in the United States were also late to adopt EMV technology, which was implemented worldwide years before, has also made US citizens more vulnerable

“EMV chips offer a security enhancement against physical card techniques such as skimming and allow cards to avoid the use of the magnetic stripe in point-of-sale systems in person.”

Sixgill discovered that four of the main payment networks were among the 76 million: Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover.

Visa had 54 percent of the market, followed by Mastercard with 34 percent and American Express and Discover were far behind: they had seven percent and two percent.

What is “phishing” and how do you avoid being scammed?

Phishing involves cybercriminals who try to steal personal information such as online passwords, bank details or money from an unsuspecting victim.

Very often, the criminal will use an email, a phone call or even a fake website that claims to be from a reputable company.

Criminals can use personal data to complete the profiles of a victim that can be sold on the dark web.

Cyber ​​criminals will use emails in an effort to obtain personal information from victims to commit fraud or infect the user's computer for harmful purposes.

Cyber ​​criminals will use emails in an effort to obtain personal information from victims to commit fraud or infect the user's computer for harmful purposes.

Cyber ​​criminals will use emails in an effort to obtain personal information from victims to commit fraud or infect the user’s computer for harmful purposes.

Some phishing attempts involve criminals who send infected files in emails to take control of the victim’s computer.

Any of the social networks or electronic communication can be part of an attempt at phishing.

Action Fraud warns you that you should never assume that an incoming message comes from a genuine company, especially if you request a payment or want to log in to an online account.

Banks and other financial institutions will never send emails looking for passwords or other confidential information.

An affected spam filter should protect you from most malicious messages, although the user should never call the number at the end of a suspicious email or follow its link.

Experts advise that customers should call the organization directly to see if the communication attempt was genuine.

According to Action Fraud: ‘Phishing emails encourage you to visit fake websites.

“Usually, they come with an excuse that sounds important for you to act in the email, such as telling you that your bank details have been compromised, or claiming that they are from a company or agency and that you are entitled to a refund, refund, reward or discount.

‘The email tells you to follow a link to enter crucial information, such as login details, personal information, bank account details or anything else that can be used to defraud you.

‘Alternatively, the phishing email may try to encourage you to download an attachment. The email states that it is something useful, such as a coupon that will be used for a discount, a form to complete to claim a tax refund or software to add security to your phone or computer.

“Actually, it is a virus that infects your phone or computer with malware, which is designed to steal any personal or bank information you have saved or retain your device to rescue it and make you pay a fee.”

Source: Action Fraud

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