Experts develop a harmless strain of bacteria that eliminates dogs’ bad breath

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Take your breath away! Researchers are developing harmless strains of bacteria that can get rid of bad breath in dogs

  • A team from the University of Arizona has developed a cure for bad breath in dogs
  • Bacteria have been modified to give off pleasant smells such as pears and mint
  • The bacteria not only eliminate bad breath, but also give off a pleasant scent for dog owners
  • Scientists say the new bacterial strand is harmless and lasts up to two hours
  • They improve the duration of action of the product up to eight or twelve hours
  • The bacteria strand is added to treats and dog food for easy consumption

A dog’s bad breath can sometimes be worse than its bite, but scientists think they finally have a cure.

A team from the University of Arizona designed a harmless strain of bacteria that eliminates the foul odor for up to two hours.

Traditional methods include toothpastes and chews that only cover up the smell with other scents, while the harmless bacteria wipe them out completely and can be added to dog treats and food.

Researchers say that the current bacteria are still in the development phase, but they improve the duration of action of the product by up to eight or 12 hours.

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A dog's breath can sometimes be worse than its bite and scientists believe there is a cure for this 'howling' one.  A team from the University of Arizona designed a harmless strain of bacteria that eliminates the foul odor for up to two hours

A dog’s breath can sometimes be worse than its bite and scientists believe there is a cure for this ‘howling’ one. A team from the University of Arizona designed a harmless strain of bacteria that eliminates the foul odor for up to two hours

Co-inventor Eric Lyons, associate professor at the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences School of Plant Sciences, said, “The applications of the invention are enormous.”

“Our plan is that eventually they will find a home among all kinds of pet treats, food and oral care products.”

Lyons and co-inventor David Baltrus, who is also an associate professor at the University of Arizona, develop the species by screening hundreds of bacteria in canine mouths and identifying 20 that were harmless and easy to modify.

The team synthesized DNA constructs encoding enzymes to produce mint or pear scents and placed those genetic programs in the selected bacteria, choosing the ones that worked best for further development and optimization.

The team synthesized DNA constructs, coded enzymes to produce mint or pear scents, and placed those genetic programs in the selected bacteria, choosing the ones that worked best for further development and optimization that can be consumed by dogs.

The team synthesized DNA constructs, coded enzymes to produce mint or pear scents, and placed those genetic programs in the selected bacteria, choosing the ones that worked best for further development and optimization that can be consumed by dogs.

Lyons said he was inspired to cure halitosis in dogs while he and business development professional Scott Zentack sat around a campfire with their dogs.

We thought that with all the knowledge available to scientists, we can now modify bacteria in the laboratory, ”Lyons recalls.

“Why can’t we make bacteria that will make the dog’s breath smell better?”

Now that the team has proven treatment, the two formed a startup called uPetsia together to bring the new technology to market.

uPetsia conducts product trials and works with industry partners to develop methods to integrate the technology into existing pet foods and snacks.

The team is considering expanding its technology to include other pets, but dogs and their owners are the first target audience.

“We hope future trials can help transition the product from an additive that only cures bad breath in pets to an additive that can prevent tooth decay and other oral conditions,” Lyons said.

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